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Full text of "73 Magazine (October 1977)"




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OCTOBER 1977 
S2.00 _ 




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26 Communicate On 10.25 GHz — with a 

simple transceiver 

WA3ETD 
30 Home Brew Tilt-Over — the water pipe 

speciaf 

W4MEA 
32 Minimize Feedline Loss — UHF buffs, 

front and center! 

W2STM 
34 How About 6 FM? - it's easy with a 

modified HE-50 

W3KBIV1 
38 W.A,S, — Easily! — catching the fast few 

W7FGD 
42 Fool the Wire Wizard - a computer 

wouidhave hefped 

Simmons 
44 Ultra Simple Diode Chacker — for grab 

hag specials 

K4G0K 
48 Beat the PC Shortage - buHd (glue) your 

owni 

Stanfield 

51 Identify That Transformer — tips for 
using boat anchors 

Tenny 

52 Subaudible Tone Encoder — access those 
closed machines 

W4NFR 
60 Build A ComCoder — versatility for the 

IC^22S 

K5UBM,WB5WSG 
66 Attache' Case Portable - Bond would 

like it! 

N4AL/WB4SCN 
68 Bujid A Beeper Alarm - if staying in 

touch is important 

[^ 88 Try Your KIWI 1 On RTTY - CUL 
on your computer 
WA5DXP 



U 94 S. D. Sales 2-80 Review - quality at 
a good price 

1^ 96 Title Your Pix With A Micro - a 

useful SSTV accessory 
K6AEP 
104 Mastering Network Operations — every- 
thing you need to knowl 
WB4E2M 
107 Try A Trapped Otpole - save copper 
and coax! 
K4IFH 




108 Liberate Your Wilson NT - who needs 

nicads? 

K2HUF 
110 Novice Antenna Specials — tips for that 

first antenna 

W2FEZ 
114 Sound Operated Relay - for the ulti- 
mate security system 

WB8DQT 
118 Traffic Handling Expblned - a lost 

art? 

WB2YKG 
120 The Third Hand - how many times? 

Miller 
122 Vehicle Security Systems - protect 

your rig 

WB5DEP 

150 One Cent Channels for the IC-22S - 
inflation fighter I 

WB2CaC, WA2HGQ 

151 The Missing Length - phantom IC-22S 
channel 

KL7IEP/1 

152 Design A Circuit Designer' - with 
special plug-in boards 

Staff 

1 53 Sensitive Meters Saved 
W6GXN 

154 Big Bust In Amarillo - bootlegger 
nabbed! 

Staff 

156 Right Way, Wrong Way, Navy Way - or 
the 73 way 
K6D ZY 

158 Living With the Family Ham - plan- 
ning births, etc. 
WA4WZL 

160 Add Jazz To Your Tempo - with a few 
simple mods 
WB8ZBJ 

164 Interested \n Television? — how to get 

started 
WB8DQT 

176 Simple Electronic Siren - tt^sloudl 
K4DHC 

178 Digital To Audio Decoder - for the 
blind operator 
Pacholok 

182 Synthesize Yourself! - practical experi- 
ments 
W1HCI 



#205 OCT 7977 



4 


Never Say Die 


14 


Letters 


18 


Looking West 


20 


AMSAT 


22 


Contests 


24 


New Products 


36 


Ham Help 


41 


Hamburglar 


43 


Oscar Orbits 


190 


Social Events 


224 


Propagation 



COVER: Photo by Delta Coya. 
Article begins on page 66* 

73 Magazine is published monthly 
by 73^ Inc., Peterborough NH 
03458, Subscription rates in the 
U.S. and Canada are $15 for one 
year, $26 for two years, and $36 
for three years. Outside the U.S. 
and Canada, write for rates. 
Second class postage paid at 
Peterborough Nf-I 03468 and at 
additional mailing offices. Publi- 
cation No. 700420. Phone: 
603-924-3873. Entire contents 
copyright 1977 by 73, Inc. 
INCLUDE OLD ADDRESS AND 
ZIP CODE WITH ADDRESS 
CHANGE NOTIFICATION. 



Microfilm edition — Uni- 
versity Microfilms, Ann 
Arbor Ml 48106. 



SJWf 






AOHWISTIUITIVE ASSfSJUff 
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ASSIHTANT NCAMAQlWlj EDFTOfl 
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IHO 




EDITORIAL BYWA YNE GREEN 



CAN THE QCWA SAVE 
AMATEUR RADIO? 

The Quarter Century Wireless 
Association (QCWA) has been around 
for a long time, but has had Httle 
Impact on events. As an editor of a 
ham magazine, I've been getting a 
little newsletter from the QCWA for 
years. It dwelt mostly on the departed 
and the departing, so \ had an impres- 
sion of the dub as one of retired 
old-timers who were doing little more 
than waiting to die ^ 

When my 25th anniversary a$a ham 
arrived, I gave little consideration to 
Joining the QCWA, not yet being 
ready to consider myself an old man. 
Event uatly a good friend of mine, 
Harry Gartsman W6ATC, pot raiher 
invofved with the dub, ^ along about 
my 35th hamn^ing year, I joined. 
Nothing c^me of tt- 

For some obscure reason, tht 
QCWA ^nvitEd me to give the talk at 
their yearly banquet — held in Seattle, 
during the ARRL convention. The 
League was pretty upset about this, 
but since it was not ttieir banquet, 
they couldn't stop ft. Mary Lewis, one 
of the organizers of the convention, 
asked me to speak to a couple of the 
convention groups — one on micro- 
computers and the other on hamming^ 
for which blasphemy the ARRL 
appears to be making every possible 
effort to block her appointment as 
SCM. Petty poHtics, but routine* 

Just judging from the QCWA news 
letters, I'd gotten the impression that 
most m^rnbers were old ARRL stal- 
iMtts, now (iving on soctal security 
and still afraid of trying anything new 
or experimentaL I'd tried speaking to 
several ham dubs whidi wefe con- 
trolled by this type of old -timer, only 
to find that the minds were so tightly 
closed that there wk no way for a 
new though! to penetrate. These are 
ttie musty ham ctubs where you find 
virtually no new hams — no 
youngsters — and heaven help the 
CBer that wanders in tor a meeting! 

Not being willing to give up with- 
out a fight, when it came my time to 
speak at the banquet, I decided to 
find out who and what the QCWA was 
really made up of. I asked for a 
showing of hands of those present 
who had pioneered FM back before 
WW 1 1 (el higgo). Much to my surprise 
and pleasure, about fifteen hands 
went up. Hmmm. 

Next I asked how many had helped 
pioneer narrow band FM in the late 
40s, and again a bunch of hands went 
up. i was more impressecL 

My critical question — how many 
were active on RTTY before I9S0 - 



these bad to be hard core pioneers* 
About 30 hands went up around the 
room. Very impressive for a group of 
about 500. 

Well, okay for the long past, but 
what have they done for us recently? 1 
asked ^bout sideband pioneering and 
almost a third of the people in the 
room had been active on SSB before 
f957* How about SSTV7 Again, up 
went the hands! About 20 of them 
had been irtvolved with moon bounce 
work and at least 50 were active on 
OSCAR. These were r»t |ust ordinary 
old men: these were the men whose 
pioneering has made amateur radio 
what it is today. 

AMATEUR RADIO 
NEEDS LEADERSHIP 

Readers keep getting exasperated 
wtth nfte for talking down the ARRL 
I wish that these people vvould try for 
a monrent to suspend btmd belief in 
whai they read in QST and laJk with 
some of the old-timers who pioneered 
the hobby we have today and find out 
the true place the ARRL holds in 
history. It is not a nice one. 

For instance, right now I doubt if 
you would be able to find one ama- 
teur anywhere in the world with any 
real grasp of the WARC situation who 
would take a bet that we will come 
out with even one liam band beiow 50 
UHz. Yet you see little of this in QST 
and you hear nothing about it during 
the ARRL forums at conventions. 

This is a complicated story, but it is 
one of which you should be aware, for 
this will have a profound effect on 
your hamming in a few years. 

The QCWA members, far from 
being a bunch of viflthering old men, 
turned out to be representatrve of the 
very heart and spirit of amateur radio. 
These are the people wtio made ama- 
teur radio what it is today - the ones 
who pioneered and invented the cir- 
cuits which we and all of the com- 
mercials are using. And they did all 
this with little help from either the 
FCC or the ARRL. Perhaps this group 
could do the job which the ARRL is 
not doing and help us to save our ham 
bands. 

Before 1 explain the situation In 
detail, 1 should give some of my own 
background. 

MY CREDENTIALS 

Old-timers know me pretty welL 
Newcomers to amateur radio may not, 
so ril take this opportunity to Intfo- 
dyce myself. 1 should do this ac least 
once every ten years anyway^ and it is 
now about ten yrars overdue. 

1 first got attracted to amateur 



radio in the mid 30s, building my own 
shortwave radios along in 1936 and 
getting seriously into hamming by 

1937. I started subscribing to OST in 

1938, and have been a member of the 
ARRL ever since. That'll be 40 years 
next year. In 1941, I was quite active, 
mostly on 160m, and \ even managed 
to win the AR R L Sweepstakes contest 
for my section that year, working 
entirety on 160m, 

When the war came along, 1 enlisted 
In the Navy and vuent to radio and 
radar school, an experience which had 
a profound effect on me. The Navy 
scf>ool was splendid and made my 
later coUege work insignificant by 
oamparison. 1 served on a submarine 
{USS Drum SS22B\ and went on fh« 
war patrolSu For those of the readers 
who are particularly interested in 
submariry^, tVe been publishing a 
Dntm newsletter which records the 
reminiscences of the crew, compiete 
with a lot of 30-yeaf old pictures. I 
took a lot of piciyres at the lirrw and 
still have them all. We were one of the 
top scoring subs, by the way, 

After the war and after college, I 
went into radio broadcasting as an 
engineer-announcer, then into tele- 
vision, first as an engineer and then as 
a director and producer. The TV work 
didn't turn out to be as creative as Td 
hoped, so I left it and got into bi-fj, 
putting a speaker cabinet on the 
market in 1952, back in the early days 
of high fideiity. That business did very 
well, but when the chance came along 
to edit CQ, I picked that . , , wouldn't 
you? 

Along in 1946. f got involved with 
tfie first narrow barKJ FM experi- 
ments. I built several transmittefs 
using N1=M and had a tot of fun with 
it during those years. NFM would be 
with us today on tfie low bands rf 
receiver manufacturers had buti! FM 
dtscrimin^ors into their ham re- 
ceivers. Using the slope of the if for 
MFM detection worked fairly vvell, 
but AM signals wiped out the FM, so 
MFM never really made it on HF. It 
w^ just the ticket for VHf though, 
and here FM detectors were being 
used — about 95% of the VHF and 
LJHF communications today is by 
NFM. 

About this same time, I got in- 
volved with RTTY. In 1948, I was 
working with WPIX (TV) in New 
York and had my 2m ham station set 
up on top of the ISIews Building next 
to the WPIX transmitter, f was using a 
522 fl had the first of them) and 
worked out all over the place from 

Continued on p9ge f5 



HI 



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Exce Pe' lance CHaracf tcs 

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Coaxial Relay Employed for Antenna Switching 
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. ,pa€iS€ttef in amateur radio 





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DIGITAL DISPLAY 00-5 (gption^ 

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NEW IMPROVED SPEECH 
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An audio com predion amplifier 
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VERNIER TUNING FOB FINAL 
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effective noise blanking cnouit 
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The VFO-520 remote VFO 

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I iOHt PATCH 

The TS-520S has 2 convenient 
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The CW-520-500 Hz filter can be 
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*, f.r.n^ tCfcn t%'! 



-»Mt*r 



The AGC circuit has 3 positions 
(OFF. FAST, SLOW) to enable 
the TS-520S to be operated in 
the optimum condition at all 
times whether operating CW 
or SSB 

The TS-520S retains ell of the 
features of the origmat TS-520 
that madB it cops in its class: RIT 
control • B*pole crystal filter * 
Built-in 25 KHz calibrator * Front 
panel carrier level control ■ Semi- 
br^ek-ln CW with s*detone • 
VOX/PTT/MOX -TUNE position 
for tow power tune up • Built-in 
Speaker * &uiN-in Cooling Fan * 
Provisions for 4 fiiced frequency 
channels • Heater switch. 



TS-620 

pectffL^- -Hs 

Amaleur Bands I5Q10 mdiis 
mote: U3B ISB OH 

Fritt)lMlflt,T - liriEiMii 

kH (f om houf *^ 

Qimitlfc i>r Htm up. ana wrthtn 
]0Q Hi c (If 30 mmiiie 

ptriod tbertittfiT 
Inties & StrnttofHfitctmr 
Jutm 3 

tS2I»W 1 1 i2BY7A1 

FETl :i 

Di0<te5 LDl 

Pow€f Reqttifeineftb' 120/220 V 

AC, SO/60 Hz. E3.g V DC 

(with opijotiAl OS^U) 
PottCf Cw»umptiori Ttgisai^ 

m Witts l^eceive: 26 W^ 

(wifti Heit^ eff) 
Oimensmn 333(13^) W i IS3 (^j 

H I 335(0 (0 3/16) D JnmOnch) 
Wfrifht: tG.0 kgiZ^l lbs) 
TRANSMFTTER 
Rf liTpuf Fotttf. SSB 200 VWatlS 

PEP CW. 160 Witts DC 
Cirntr Suppr^sion: Better than 

Sideband Supprtssion Better 

than -50 dB 
Spurious Radiation Better than 

-40 dB 
M^c^ophane Impedance 50h Ohms 
AF Resofinst: 4QQ iQ 2,6€0 Mi 

RECEIVER 

SensiNvity: 25 uV lor 10 d6 
fS-HN)/N 

Sefedivity: SSB:2.4 kH2/-6 m, 

4 4 kHz/-60 dB 
Selfictjvit> CW 0.5 kHz/-6 m, 

1.5 kHi/-m dB (with optianaf 

mS20 liller; 
Image Ratio. Belter than 50 dB 
IF Reiectian Better ttian SO dB 
AF Output F()WQf 1.0 VVatI (8 

Dhm load, with less than 10% 

disliirti^ri) 

AF Outpul Imiwdance 4 la Ifi 
Ohms 

DG-5 

SPECIFICAHONS 
MeasunRg Range: 100 Hz to 
40 MHz 

llfput lilipedance: 5 li Ohins 

Gate Ttme OJ See 

Inptft Sensitivity 100 Hz to 4Q 

MH: 2£K) mV rms or Ofcr. ID 

Miz lolOMHt 50niVQrover 
Uetswnng Aouracy; tnternal time 

base acofracf -±&i cfrtmt 
Tiin« Bsse 10 UMi 
Operitmg Temperaiiife: -tO'' to 

50' C/M* 122' F 
f(mer Requ Supplied 

(nonmiial 13.8 VDC) 
DiflnenstCNis. 167(6 9/16) W i 
l3(lli;lfi)Hi^M^9/16>0 
nim(mch) 

Mfetghl: 13 k^{l% m 




DG^ 5 c»nrMH:tMi»n$ 



patch 
connncliQint 



TrDfitvanar ^w:M 



Receive 
AnienriA 
switch 



120V/ 220V twilc^ 





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FoKowing are a few of the 
TS-S20S' many exciting 
features. 

PtL • The TS-820S employs 
the latest phase lock loop 
circuilry^ The single 
conversion receiver section 
performance offers superb 
protection against unwanted 
cross-modulation. And now 
PLL allows the frequency to 
remein the same when 
switching sidebands (USB. 
LSB. CW) and eliminates 
having to recalibrate each 
time. 

DIGITAL READOUT • The 
dtgital counter display is em* 
ployed as an integral part o1 
the VFO readout system. 
Counter mixes the carrier VFO. 
and first heterodyne frequen- 
cies to give exaci frequency. 
Figures the frequency down 
to 10 Hz and digital display 



reads out to 100 Hz. Both 
naceive and transmit frequen 
cies are displayed in easy to 
read. Kenwood Blue digits. 
SPEECH PROCESSOR • An 
RF circuit provides qu^ck 
time constant compression 
using a true RF compressor 
as opposed to an AF clipper. 
Amoum of compression is 
adjustable to the desired 
level by a convenient front 
pane! control. 
IF SHIFT- The IF SHIFT 
control varfes the IF pass- 
band without changing the 
receive frequency. Enables 
the operator to eHmir\ate 
unwanted signals by moving 
them out of the passband of 
the feceiver* This feature 
alone rnakes the T$-820S 
a pacesetter. 

'The lS-820 and DG-1 fire «tHI avail 
nble separately. 





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*,.f>w*rt Ki**i" **** **" •"' ^'*' : 



t>M fi 



Experience the excitement of 6 

meters. The TS'600 all mode trans* 
ceiver lets you experience the fun 
of 6 meter band openings. 

This 10 watt, solid state rig covers 
50,0-54.0 MHz, The VFO tunes the 
band in 1 MHz segments, it also 






CWU«| 




<^A 




f CU' 



has provisions for fixed frequency 
operation on NETS or to listen for 
beacons. State of the art features 
such as an effective noise blanker 
and the RIT (Receiver Incremental 
Tuning) circuit make the TS-600 
another Kenwood "Pacesetter'*, 



I 




TV-5 



An easy way to get on ihe 6 
meter band with your TS-520/ 

520S, TS-820/820S and most 
other transceivers. Simply plug 
it in and you re on , . . full band 
coverage with tO watts output 
on SSB and CW. 



oo 



f, ! 



$ KINWOOO 

I / 



V 



a 



4 



-i 



ixperience tne luxury of 450 MHz 
at an economical price 
The TR-8300 offers high quality 
and superb performance as a result 
of many years of improving VHF/ 
UHF design techniques. The trans* 



ceiver fs capaoie of Fa emission 
on 23 crystal-controlled channels 
(3 supplied). The transmitter out- 
put is 10 watts. 

The TR-8300 incorporates a 5 
section helical resonator and a 



two-pole crystal fitter in the IF 
section of the receiver for improved 
intermodulation characteristics. 
Receiver sensitivity, spurious 
response, and temperature 
characteristics are excellent. 



-ij_ 



, pQi'i'St'iier m amaieur raiiio 





WITH DIGITAL FREQUENCY DISPLAY 



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B*T R-OK 



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MIC 



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BAND 
lUff 



FfX CH 




Features: Digital readout with Kenwood Blue" digits • 
High gain receiver pre^amp • 1 watt lower power switch • 
Built in VOX • Semi-break in on CW • CW sidetone * 
Operates all modes: 5SB (upper & lower), FM, AM and CW 
• Completety solid state circuitry provides stable, Jong last- 
ing, troubie-free operation • AC and DC capability (operate 
from your car, boat, or as a base station through its built-tn 
power supply) • 4 MHz band coverage (144 to 148 MHz) * 
Aulomattcaiiy switches transmit frequency 600 KHz for 
repeater operation. Simply dial in your receive frequency 
and the radio do€s the rest, . , simplex. repeater, reverse • Or 
accomplish the same by plugging a single crystal into one 
of the 1 1 crystal positions for your favorite channel • 
Transmit/ Receive capability on 44 channels with 11 crystals 




Handsomely styled and a perfect companion to 
the TS-700S. This unit provides you with the 
extra versatility and the luxury of having a 
second VFO in your shack. Great for split 
frequency operation and for tuning off fre- 
quency to check the band. The function switch 



on the VFO- 7 00 S selects the VFO in use and 
the appropriate frequency is displayed on the 
digital readout in the TS-700S. In addition a 
nnomentary contact "frequency check" switch 
allows you to spot check the frequency of the 
VFO not in use. 




n 





Featuras Kenwood's unique Continuous Tone Coded 
Squelch system, 4 MHz band coverage* 25 watt 
output and fully synthesized 800 channel operation. 
This compact package gives you the kind of perfonn- 
ance specirications you've always wanted in a 
2-meter amateur rig. 

Outstanding sensitivity, large-sized helical resonators 
with High Q to minimize undesirable out-of-band 
interferance, and give a 2-pole 10.7 MHz monolithic 
crystal filter combine to give your TR*7400A outstand- 
ing receiver performance. Intermodulation character* 
istics {Better than 66dB), spurious (Better than -60dB), 
image rejection (Better than — 70dB), and a versatile 
squelch system make the TR-7400A tops in its class 

ShcMm with th« PS-8 power supply 

{Active filters and Tofie Burst Modytts pptional) 




This 100 channel PLL synthesized 146-148 MH2 
transceiver comes with 88 pre-programmed channels 
for use on all standard repeater frequencies (as per 
ARRL Band Plan) and most simplex channels. For 
added flexibility, there are 6 diode-programmabte 
switch positions. The 15 KHz shift function makes 
these 6 positions into 12 channels. 10 watt output, 
dt600 KHz offset and LED digital frequency display 
are just a few of the many fine features of the TR-7500 

The PS~6 is the handsomely styled, matching power 
supply for the TR-7500. Its 3,5 amp current capacity 

and built-in speaker make it the perfect companion for 
home use of the TR-7500, 





The high performance portable 2-meter FW 
transceiver. 146-148 MHz, 12 channels (6 
supplied), 2 watts or 400 mW RF output. 
Everything you need is included: Ni-Cad 
battery pack, charger, carrying case 
and microphone 



I 





,,, pacesetter in anialeur radio 




4* 'ib 



Kenwood developed the T-5S9D transmitter and R-599D 
receiver for the most discriminating amsteur. 
The R-599D is the most compfete receiver ever offered. It is 
entirely solid state, superbly reliable and compact. It covers the 
full amateur band, 10 through 1 60 meters, CW, LSB, USB, 
AM and FM, 

The T-599D is sotid-staie with the exception of only three 
tubes, has built-in power supply and full metering. It operates 
CW, LSB. USB and AM and. of course, is a perfect match to 
the R-599D receiver- 

If you have never considered the advantages of operating a 
receiver/transmitter combination . maybe you should. 
Because of the targer number of controls and dual VFOs the 
combination offers flexibility impossible to duplicate wrth a 
transceiver. 

Compare the specs of the R-599D and the T-S99D with any 
other brand Remember, the R-599D is ail solid state (and in- 
cludes four filters). Your choice will obviously be the Kenwood. 











Dependable operation, superior specifications and excellent 
features make the R-300 an unexcailed value for the 

shortwave listener It offers full band coverage with a 

frequency range of 1 70 KHz to 30 MHz * Receives AM, 

SSB and CW • Features large, easy to read drum dials 

with fast smooth dial action * Band spread is calibrated for 

the 10 foreign broadcast bands, easily tuned with the use 

of a built-in 500 KHz calibrator • Automatic noise limiter • 

3 way power supply system (AC /Batteries /External DC) 

take it anyplace • Automatically switches to battery 

power in the event of AC power failure. 




A mi 



H^^^^^^^^^_^_ ft 




I 




11 
1 




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I- 




^Atf^ equipment that kbugs in every 
well equipped statiou 



320 Series 

TS-820S, . -TS^820 with Digital 
I natal ted 

TS-820, . . . VO-160 U Deluxe 
Transceiver 

DG-1 Digtial Fmqueacy Display 

forTS^820 
VFO'820. . .Deluxe Remote VFO for 

forTS-820/820S 
CW^820. . , 500 Hz CW Filter for 

TS-820/820S 
DS-1 A , . . . DC-DC Converter for 

B20/820 Series 
520 Series 

TS-520S ... 1 60^1 M Transceiver 
DG'& ,,..,. Oigilal Frequency Display 

for TS-520 Series 
VFO-520. . .Remote VFO lor TS-620 

and TS-520S 
SP-520. . .Exiernal Speaker for 

520/820 Series 

CW-520, . 500 Hz CW Fiher (or 

TS-S20/520S 
0K~520. . . .Digital Addptor Kit for 

TS-520 

5990 Series 

R-599D 1 60-1 M Solid State 

Receiver 
T-5990 80-?0 M Mstchmg 

Transmitter 
S-599 External Speaker for 599D 

Series 



CC-29A. .2 Meter Convener for 
R-599D 

CC-69 ..... 6 Meter Converter for 

R-599D 
FM^599A. . FM Frlier for R-599D 



R-300 GeneraE Coverage SWL Receiver 



TS-600. 
TS-700S 



6 M AU Mode Transceiver 

2 M All Mode Digital 
Transceiver 

.Remote VFO for TS-700S 
Match [ng Speaker for 
TS 600/700 Series 
2 M Portable FM 
Transceiver 

TR-7400A, 2 M Synthesized Deluxe 
FM Transceiver 



VF0^700S 
SP-70 

TR-2200A 



TR-7500.. 


100 Channel Synthesized 




2 M FM Transceiver 


TR-8300. . 


, 70 CM FM Transceiver 




(450 MHrf 


TV.506 


6 M Trans verter for 




520/820/599 Series 


HS-4 


. Headphone Set 


MB 1A, .. 


. .Mounting Bracket for 




TR-2200A 


MC-50. ,.. 


Desk Microphone 


PS-5 


. Power Supply for TR-SSOO 


PS-6 


. Power Supply for TR 7500 


PS-S...,. 


. Power Supply for TR-7400A 


VOX'3 . . , . 


VOX for TS-600/ 700A 



Trio- Kenwood slocks a complete line of 
replacement parts, accessor res, and manosis 
for all Kenwood rnodels. 



Rubber Helical Antenna 
Telescoping Whip Antenna 
Ni-Cad Battery Pack (set) 
4 Pm Mic, Connector 
Active Filter E tern eats 
Tone Burst Modules 
AC Cables 
DC Cables 



Model p 



For use wuh 





The Kenwood HS-4 headptione set adds 
ver^lilify to any Kenwood station. For 
«)[tdr>ded periods of wear, the HS-4 is comfort- 
ably padded and U cofnpletely adjustable The 
frequencv response ol the HS--4 i^ tai Pored 
i^crficalhf for amateur communic3tioo use, 
(300 19 300O Nz« 8 oJims^. 



RA-1 

T9D-0082-05 

PBt5 

EO 7-040 305 

See Service Manual 

S«e. Service Manual 

Specify Model 

Specify Model 






TR-2200A 
TR'2200A 
TR-2200A 
All Models 

TR-7400A 

TS 700A; TR-7400A 

All Models 

Ail Models 



The MC-SO dynamic microphone h&s bwm 
designed eitpress^y for amateur radio operatioo 
m& a splendid addaaon to any Kmvmood sttsck 
Cornpleie with PIT and LOCK switches, arvd a 
microphone plug for instant hc*ok-up to any 
Kenwood rig Easily converted to high or tew 
impedance. (600 or 50k ohm). 



TRfO-KENWOOO COMMUNICATIONS INC. 
1111 WEST WALNUT/COMPTDN.CA 90220 



$ 




txfltfr tn amfiffitr rnifu* 



•0 u rro o n H d c; r\ ' t k^ v e r xyx^o of r 



MORE 220 







V i * ^'i. L 



she shoii 



HOOKED! 



] 



Way back in Oct, 1960, I sub- 
scribed to a new magazine which I 
found I enjoyed immensely. I didn't 
always agree with you, but \ always 
enjoyed you. However, after about 
seven or eight years, I foynd that my 
interest in ham radio in gererat had 
waned and I let my subscription lapse. 
I have done just enough operating to 
keep my license current, but that's all. 

Then, a coupte of months ago, 
there arrived in the mail an announce- 
ment about a new magazine (where 
did yog ever get my name?}. It 
soynded interesting, especially with 
the name Green on the masthead, so I 
subscribed. Wow, hooked! This whole 
business of microprocessors sounded 
fantastic. So. I went out and bought 
an Intel evaluation board as one way 
to get started in this thing. In the 
process, the proprietor of the Byte 
Shop where I bought the board threw 
in a few recent issues of 73. You 
know, it's even better than I remem- 
bered. So. enclosed is my check for 
another subscription. You have re- 
whetted my appetite for ham radio. I 
am looking forward to amalgamating 
these interests. Don't let anyone talk 
you out of continuing the I/O articles 
in 73 — it's obviously the future of 
the hobby, just like SSB was back in 
the 50s and repeaters have been 
recently. 

Dr. J^rrold Goldman WB6M0E 

Milbrae CA 



STANDARDS 



I just got done reading your Jast 
is$ue of 75 and I must say I enjoyed St 
very trtuch, as usual. But there are a 
couple of things I would like to get 
off my chest. 

First, I must say that I was a CBer, 
but after much frustration, I decided 
that there had to be something better 
m life, so I went to work on my ham 
ticket, code and all. And sure enough, 
it paid off when I worked WB6TVX — 
no great amount of DX, but I was a 
ham and very proud of it I hope we 
will fight to keep our standards high 
enough to be proud of our licenses. 
They weren't just given to us — we 
had to earn them, and for some of us, 
it took a lot of work. Needless to say, 
it's something I value very much. 

Hopefully, any CBer who wants to 
upgrade will take on the responsibility 
that comes with a ham ticket — that 
means code and all 

Also, as far as the I/O section and 
the computer articles, I don't under- 
stand much of it now, but I didn't 



even understand a simple amplifier 
circuit when I started. I am excited 
about the possibilities of computers in 
ham radio: it's a very high goal and a 
btg challenge for me, but it's not 
impossible. 

So, keep up the good work; it's a 
worthy cause. 

Eugene Morgan WB7RLX 
Ogdert UT 



eOSMAC 

To all 1S02 users: The 1802 Ex^ 
change. 

Very little software for the RCA 
CDP1S02 is currently In the public 
domain. To remedy this situation, I 
am going to publish a ten-page book- 
let listing available software. If you 
desire to sell or even give away your 
software, please send me a listing for 
my review. My booklet will provide a 
complete description and cost infor- 
mation with a reference number corre- 
sponding to a number on an ordering 
coupon. 

I plan to charge $t for the booklet 
This amount will also cover the costs 
associated with processing the 
coupons. The use of the coupon will 
reduce the costs to the person order- 
ing from more than one source. 

The publication date is set for early 
December. Advance orders may be 
made at $1 per copy. Here is your 
chance to buy a good selection of 
software as well as sell some. Send all 
orders, software listings^ and other 
correspondent to; 

Ross Wirth 

1636S. 108 E.Ave. 

Tulia OK 74128 



TSETSE NIT 



Pardon me while I pick a nit. 

I enjoyed Sam Kelly's article on 
Soviet test gear (Aug. 77), but spotted 
one miniscule error, I'm sure that this 
important bit of information will be 
of great importance to all of your 
readers. 

The VOIVI discussed and pictured is 
not a U'4341. The designation is 
Ts-4341. Although that letter may 
look like our "U/' it is not the same. 
Note that it is somewhat square and 
has a tail. Transliterated, the letter is 
calted "tse/' {For what it's worth, the 
Cyrillic "U" sound looks like our ^'Y" 
— but that's another story.) 

Now, aren't you glad that I spotted 
that grievous error? 

William F. Blinn 
Worthington OH 

Got iff Thanks, Biff. - J.M. 



This Is In response to the letter 
"220 - No Loss" from IVl.P. Lewton 
WA6PHR, appearing in the August 
issue of 73. I am sure that Mr. Lewton 
has not taken the time to examine the 
problems involved with an adjacent 
(or shared) amateur/CB 220 MHz al- 
location- We now realize that the 
allocation of 1 1 meters to the Citizens 
Service was a mistake, [f only because 
of the proximity of the desirable 
amateur frequencies and the avail- 
ability of equipment which is 
obviously illegal for use by the CB 
licensee. I, for one, do not want any 
of the three 220 MHz repeaters in 
Columbus to be infested by the un- 
controlEable illegal use that would 
occur if a CBer merely had to buy a 
crystal to cross the tine. Perhaps Mr. 
Lewton would propose a CB band at 
148,0 MHz? 

IVl.P. suggests that we could stilt use 
the frequencies with our CB licenses, 
so there would be no loss to us. If I 
wanted to operate as a CBer, I would 
be a CBer and not bother with the 
FCC examinations In the amateur 
service. I am an amateur, I have not 
found any reason that requires me to 
get a CB license, and I don't foresee 
any reason that would make a CB 
license necessary or desirable for me 
in the future. 220 MHz is ours now, 
and we are getting along quite well 
without undtscEplined intrusion. 

Concerning the suggested reduction 
in prices on 220 rigs due to the CB 
mass production — where have you 
been. M.P,? Look in Q$T for May, 
1977, page 169, The Midland 13 509. 
one of the best available 220 rigs, sells 
for $149 from AES, and similar prices 
from other suppliers all over the 
country. The Clegg FM-76 is similarly 
priced. The prices, when compared to 
two meter rigs of similar quality, are 
50 reasonable now that it is un- 
reasonable to assume that the El A 
manufacturers will make any effort to 
reduce the price of 220 CB rigs. 

The matter of whether CB really 
needs (or more importantly, deserves] 
more frequency allocations is really 
Irrelevant — 220 Is currently used 
extensively in some areas by a disci- 
plined, licensed service. 220 MHz 
activity is growing strongly in many 
areas of the country as 2 meters 
becomes more and more congested, 
and the promise is for increased 
development as a practical, logical 
alternative. 

Add to this the objections of 
Canada and Mexico, the widely-held 
view of a 220 MHz CB band as a 
governmental reward to CSers for 
their excellent success in creating a 
bastion of garbage and illegal activities 
on 11 meters, and the reluctance of 
the FCC to place a CB service in a 
frequency range that would allow the 
use of available amateur amplifiers, 
and you find the finger pointing to 
9O0 MHz as the only reasonable spot 
to stick any expanded CB service. 

So, Mr. Lewton, I suggest you get 
in touch with some 220 group in your 
area and learn some of the facts 
concerning the current amateur 220 



MHz band. Maybe we'll see you there 
soon — as an amateur, nor as a CBec^ 

Jeff Maass WBBJXS/WRSAOV 

Central Ohio Area 

Repeater Group 

Columbus OH 



DOES NOT COMPUTE 

Please relieve me of the duty of 
removing that big thick book from my 
tiny apartment size mailbox, and the 
obvious advertising it gives the neigh- 
bors when placed in the adjacent junk 
mall collection box. 

The last straw was the "article" in 
Aug., '77, "When the Lights Go Out - 
prepare yourself." Please, prepare 
first, like a good scout. Also, jelly for 
sandwiches for five days? Jelly spoils 
when opened in hot humid climates. 
Why leave out good old peanut but- 
ter? it keeps without cooling, is very 
nourishing, and is politically ex- 
pedient. 

Amateur radio as /'t used to be is 
still my favorite hobby. I can still 
remember listening to Pitcairn Island 
on 20 meter AM on a single tube 
superrengenerative receiver. And the 
thrill of the very first xtal clear CW on 
a homemade two tube receiver. And 
listening to Tennessee and Kentucky 
on 5 meters, back in Wisconsin, on a 
June day in '39. 

Try that on your doggone new- 
fangled computers. 

Roy A. McCarthy K6E AW 
Anaheim CA 



WELL DONE 



Our congratulations to Stew Perry, 
"King of 160," on his thirty years in 
amateur radio, I was impressed with 
his station as pictured on the cover of 
your June issue, but he really should 
do something about the accuracy of 
his clocks! 

Chuck LaPointe WD9DXF 
OrtandPark IL 



THANKS 



This letter is to express my sincere 
appreciation to you for publishing my 
letter in the August issue of 7 J, in 
which I asked assistance in getting 
information on ham radio for the 
deaf. 

The response was immediate and 
dramatic. Only this morning, Gene 
DeGroot from Randolph Wl called 
me. He has accomplished some re- 
markable work in this field. His advice 
has saved me many hours of ground 
work. Moreover, he has put me in 
touch with some ham operators who 
are deaf , , . and some both deaf and 
blind. 

I do not mean this as a criticism of 
QST or ARRL, but as a high compli- 
ment to you. 

Over a period of 4 months, I wrote 
IVlr. Baldwin Twfce requesting this 



Continued on page 46 



14 




BOiTORtAL 



from page 4 

thai beautiful location. My 16 ele- 
ment beam didn't tiurt erttter. It was 
one built by UHF Resonator, Bill 
Hoisjngton, who many years later 
would ^nte a long series of articles 
for 73 and would noue to Peter- 
borough to be near the magazine. 

By late '48 I was deeply into RTTY 
«id helped John Williams W2BFD set 
up the first ham repeater in the 
country »r^ the Municipal Building in 
New York in 1949. It lasted a few 
months and then the FCC closed it 
down. The FCC worked for years Co 
do all tt could to prevent amateurs 
from pioneering and m venting . , . and 
they are still at it, though things are 
getting berter. 

In 1951, I started a RTTY news^ 
letter; this ran until 1955 when I 
became editor of CO. It was during 
this period that I became aware of the 
heavy hand ehe ARRL had on ama- 
teur radio and the way they worked 
with the FCC to discourage amateur 
pioneering. A group of us worked for 
years to get RTTY permitted on the 
low bands, with the ARRL filling us 
e\^ry inch of the way* 

When I became editor of CQ in 
January, 1955. f be^n to really get 
the inside cfope on what was going on 
in amateur radio, and the more I 
heard^ the more disgusted I got with 
the ARRL. Having known Harry 
Dannals W2TUK for several years, I 
figured almost anyone would be 
better as a Hudson Division Director, 
so I backed another chap — who won. 
This diap in short order put the 
League trrto good ffnandai shape, got 
fid of the old general manager, and 
had things runnir^ better than they 
had been in years. 

73 STARTED 

After leaving CQ in January, 1960, 
I tried my hand at working for an ad 
agency, and then decided it was time 



EEN 



to fee if I could get a new ham 
magazine started. The projected 
expense for starting a new magarine 
was about $500,000, so I didn't have 
a lot of luck getting investors — I 
couldn't find one. Oh. well — I 
decided to go ahead without money 
and do it anyway. 

Before I got into editir>g and pub- 
fishing 73^ I was doing r^sonably well 
, , * I had two Porsches, a nice Chris 
Craft Express Cruiser, a pfane, yearly 
trips to Europe, and my own Arabian 
horse. Starting a magazine ts akin to 
taking vows of poverty when joining a 
religious order ... except that you 
can get out of the religion. No more 
Porsches, yachts, planes, or horses . * . 
and darned few European trips. After 
17 years, I've become accustomed to 
working tOO or so hours a week, and 
since I have virtually no private life 
whatever, I am sort of amused at even 
the concept of a "personal expense." 

Mind v<»u, I'm not beefing, t signed 
Up for this when I started Z3 . . . and I 
aggravated it when I started Byte and 
Kilobaud magazines. There is a degree 
of self d est ructiveness involved, too. 
Obviously this will catch up with me 
or^ of these days and bam, silent 
keys. My long range goals are to try 
to make the world a little better place. 
Through the magazines, I pro- 
vide entertainment, education, and 
help people have a lot more fun. Since 
! have little interest in money other 
than as a necessity for getting things 
done, I'm an enigma to many people. 

Enough of alt that — the main 
subject at present is the future of 
amateur radio. I've participated in 
many of the developments of the 
past: working personally with MFM, 
RTTY, SS8, SSTV, fBoonbounce, 
repeeter^, OSCAR, DXing, DXpedi- 
t ion in 9, and so forth. There isn't 
much that*s gone on in the last 40 
years of amateur radio that I haven't 



Continued on p9gs 95 



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FOUR DIFFEFENT KINDS? 

When i am invited to talk to an 
amaieuf group, I often begin by 
asking a rather simple but fo&t^sd 
question; "How many different kinds 
of repeaters are there?" Usually, 1 get 
at a first response exactly what I 
expect. An amateur raises hts hand 
and says. 'Two: open and closed." 
Then someone In the back of the 
room will shout out: '*Yoy forgot 
autopatchf" Mo^ of the time it stops 
thert , and the discussion startSn 

Southern California relay communi- 
cation ts steeped in sfeawiide tradi- 
tions^ and out of thii has come ac- 
ceptance of four different categories 
of relay operatton: open, closed, 
private, and the individually owned 
and operated, re mote I y - c on t rol led 
amateur base station radio, more com- 
monly known as a remote base. To 
complicate matters even further, these 
four categories of relay systems 
operate under one of two operational 
formats' baste and advanced. Let's 
cover the latter of these two designa- 
tors first. 

Until about a yt^ ^rid a half ago, 
vary few people gave much constdera- 
tion to operational format. A repeater 
was a repeater, and remote bases were 
those "things" that popped up on ,94 
once in a while and were usually heard 
on .46. How^ef, as technology pro- 
gfessed, so did a need on the part of 
some to show their own mdli^iduality. 
Out of this grew the terminology, 
"advanced format" and "basic for- 
mat/' 

How, though, does an "advanced 
format*' system differ from one of 
"basic format"? Really, it's in the 
peripherals and the use a system is put 
to. In many ways, the microprocessor 
had a lot to do with it, I ^Jess. Many 
"advanced format" systems utilize 
mio^processors for overall system 
control and security. Then tticre is the 
concept of interlinking on a wide scale 
basis. Some of these groups have 
intentions o1 building nattonal inter- 
I inked networks, by which they will 
be able to ''function up" any city 
they wish at the touch of a finger on a 
tone pad. Some are well on their way 
to achieving this goat. From the fore- 
going, you might imagine that most 
"advanced format'* systems are also 
private systems. Your assumption 
would be correct. In fact* "super 
private" would be far better termi- 
nology- This type of acfvanced state- 
of-the-art communications requires a 
totally controlled environmerit. and it 
is for this reason that no such system 
is found on two meters. Those in- 
volved in "advanced format" amateur 
relay communications tend to go to 
spectrum where they can achieve their 
objectives without taking away valu- 
able spectrum from the average ham. 
They "do their thing," bother no one, 
and {most important} help advance 



communications technology. If thefe 
is one point of consternation, it is that 
such systems are not available for use 
by the average "Joe Ham"; their basic 
structure precludes this. Sometimes a 
system such as this is "down" for 
months of redesign, and very few 
"users" are willing to put up with this. 
By and large, they are made up of 
smaM groups of a dozen or fewer 
dedicated experimenters, who seem to 
live for a "mission" of finding a better 
way (o "do it/' to talk farther. In 
actuality, the terms "advanced" and 
'Iwsic" have come from those in- 
volved in the former, as a way of 
letting the w^rid know that their 
particular operation ts indeed dif- 
ferent from the norm* Anything that 
does not meet the criteria of an 
"advanced fonmat" system is then 
considered ''basic format." Having an 
autopatch does not count 

Now, let's discuss categories of re- 
peaters. We are talking "types" and 
not access coding. Open repeaters? 
Yes, we have our share of them. In 
fact, this state boasts more open 
repeaters than anywhere else in the 
nation. Want to involve yourself in 
emergency communicatiofTs? Want to 
rag chew? No matter what you are 
looking for, there is a repeater $ome- 
wfvere to meet youf needs, an opefi 
repeater, there for your ma. Most 
licensees and/or ^)onsoring organiza- 
tions only ask that you use and 
support soch systems and not abuse 
them. Some have very lenient system 
regulations, while others might well 
constitute a structured mini-society* 
Whatever your preference, you will 
find it. 

How, then, do "closed" and 
"private" systems differ from open 
systems and from each other, and, 
under the structure of FCC regulation, 
how can they exist? The latter answer 
is indeed simple. Justification for such 
systems comes from official recogni- 
tion of their existence. Such was the 
case during the early days of deregula^ 
lion, when, in its repoa and order on 
remote control, the f CC specifically 
recognized the concept of the closed 
system and granted such systems the 
ability to operate under the doctrine 
of "fully automatic remote control" 
(while at the same time granting only 
"semi- automatic remote control" to 
open systems). There are also the 
statements made by FCC personnel 
when questioned on this topic, such as 
that of Dick Everett at SAROC's FCC 
Fofum last January, when he stated 
that no amateur is obligated to pro- 
vide any service to any other amateur. 
Then, too, there is the question of the 
constitutional right of an individual to 
use his amateur station (his own 
personal property) in any way he sees 
fit, as long as its use does not bring 
harm to others. 

Suffice it to say that tfte FCC and 
the overall amateur community have 
come to recognize the existence and 
operation of relay systems whose ac- 
cess is available only to a limited 



segment of the amateur communtty. I 
realize that to some the existence of 
such systems is a sore spot: however, 
the fact is that the concept of the 
"limited access system" is growing out 
here, and I suspect that we are indica- 
tive of what's happening nationally. 
You in your area know far better than 
L By present count, souilTern 
California holds (on 2 metersj twenty 
such classified systems, up three from 
last year, 220> a band most thought 
would be a h an/en for open systems, is 
about 30% limited access. However, 
here such systems are forced to share 
channels with other such systems. So 
white there may be twenty SCRA- 
coordinated closed and private sys^ 
terns on 2, only part of that number 
of channel pairi is In use by them. 

"Closed** systoms differ from 
"prrvate" systems in the following 
way. A "closed" repeater is one in 
which membership within the 
sponsoring organization is required in 
order to use said system; however, 
such membership is available to all 
interested members of the amateur 
community. Systems dedicated to 
emergency sen/ ices, such as RACES 
and ARES, wherein b\\ communica- 
tion content must be of either an 
operational or "drill" nature, would 
probably be fair e^tamples. On the 
other hand, a "private" repeater also 
requires group membership. However, 
membership and thereby system ac- 
cess IS at the lOtaJ discretion of the 
system licensee and/or his sponsoring 
organization. Therein lies tfie dif- 
ference* 

Vd like to dispel the long-standing 
myth among amateurs that a repeater 
is automatically to be considered 
"closed" Of "private" if it requires 
that users equip themselves with tone 
coding devices to activate the system. 

I call this a myth because that is 
exactly what It Is. However, even such 
an austere organization as the ARRL 
seems to live under this total misap- 
prehension, as was made evident in 
their July, 1977, issue of QST 
("Washington Mailbox" column, p. 
74), in which the writer states some- 
thing to the effect that any repeater 
tt^at requires a tone to activate it is a 
closed repeater. While placing a tone- 
activated device on a system's input 
can have the effect of limiting user^ 
ship, such is not the proper use of 
such devices. Tone coding in its many 
forms, including burst, digital burst. 
CTCSS, and digital CTCSS, was 
developed for use in the commercial 
land mobile radio sector as a means of 
increasing spectrum loading — not to 
keep people off repeaters. 

Here ts how such a system works^ 
Most commonly used in the land 
mobile service is CTCSS, which stands 
for Continuous Tone Coded 
Squelched System. You might be 
more familiar with it under one of its 
trade names, such as Motorola Private 
Line (PL) or General Electric Channel 
Guard. These are registered trade- 
marks of these manufacturers. They 
enable more than one person to 
operate on a given channel (or channel 
pair, in the case of relay devices) on a 
minimal interfering basis. Such an 
entity might be a "community re- 



peater, " 35 we shall now descdbe. 

Most of us consider a repeater to be 
a device with which one group of 
people communicates via a given 
cfianr\el pair. In commercial service, 
one repeater may be set up to serve 
the needs of two, three^ or even a 
do Jen individuals or business ^oups^ 
This is accomplished by aligning 
individual tone code assignments to 
each person on the system. In our 
example, let's say that we have three 
businesses sharing a commercial re- 
peater. Let's caH them Smith's 
Delivery Service* Tom the Plumber, 
and City Bus Service, Each has a 
specific communications need, and CB 
radio will not sjuffice. They all wind 
up on a given "community repeater." 
Each is assigned a specific El A stan- 
dardized tone code of the CTCSS 
variety. Smith ts aligned 1A, Tom 
gets 3B. and CBS gets 4B. However, 
a! I operate through the same repeater 
and transmit and receive on the same 
channel pair. 

Contained within the electronics of 
both the repeater and each user's 
radio are cone encoders and decoders. 
The repeater itself has the abitity to 
decode and regenerate a!l three of the 
CTCSS tones installed, while the 
users' radios only respond to their 
preassigned codes. Let's suppose that 
Mrs. Jones, the dispatcher for the bus 
company, wants to tell Tim, the 
driver, to go over to the Little Red 
Schoolhouse. She renwves the mk:ro- 
phone from its cradte. When she does 
this, a switch tKiilt inio the cradle 
automaticatly closes and defeats the 
internal decoder, allowing her to hear 
any channel activity that's not being 
directed toward her. Hearing nothing, 
Mrs, Jones calls her mobile and passes 
her message. Had she heard another 
conversation in progress, she would 
have been obliged to wait for its 
conclusion. In the meantime, when no 
traffic is being directed at her, her 
radio is silent, even though the 
channel may be under heavy use. The 
same holds true for each of the 
channel users. They only hear traffic 
directed at them — uniess ttiey want 
to listen in for entertainment pur- 
poses, I suspect some do. 

The ability to share, to increase 
channel loading, and thereby to use 
spectrum more efficiently, is the true 
purpose of tone coding. To use it to 
restrict those "unwanted" by you or 
your group is defeating its intent — 
tone coding was never meant to be a 
means for security, and besides, with 
tone codes ElA-standardlzed, how 
much and hoyy effective a security 
method can it realiy be? 

This being the case, what really 
makes a repeater "closed" or 
"private"? It's attityde, the anitude 
of those people placing such systems 
into operation and the attitude of 
those invited onto such systems^ In 
out part of the country, we have a 
number of totally "open" systems 
whk:h, due to either co-channel align- 
ments or nearby adjacent channel 
assignments, have utilized tone coding 
as a method to minimize interference 
to their operation. Still, these systems 
are in every sense of the word "open"; 
they are available to any amateur who 
wants to use them. By the same 



18 



token, we have a few "private" re- 
peaters that reqyire no tone access 
whatioever. Yet these systems are 
truly ''private" In every sef>se of the 
vMord, In each case, it is the anJtyde of 
those involved with a given system 
that decides its category — tone 
codtrtg enters not. 

Hov\^ can amateurs make better use 
of methods such as CTCSS? On Bn 
individual basis, it's been happening 
for veafs on WR6ABB and a few other 
LA area repeaters. Following the lead 
of the commercial sector, a number of 
individual sub-user groups have taken 
to installing CTCSS encoder/decoder 
packages in their radios, with auto- 
matic mike cradle switches as earlier 
described. In this way, they cm still 
hear the messages directed toward 
them, even though they are not forced 
to listen to ail the channel chatter. 
One might call this "private" groups 
functioning through "open" repeaters. 
Another method Is that of channel 
sharing in crowded urban areas, where 
coordinators have run out of available 
spectrum and are faced with an ever* 
mounting deluge of channel assign- 
ment requests. What I am about to 
describe may not now be popular, but 
watt four of five years and then read it 
again. 

Suppose that an area is totally out 
of spectrum upon which to coordinate 
another repeater withoiii causing mas- 
sive interference to existing area 
dctivity. On the coordinator's desk sit 
too or more demands for repeater 
pairs. If he does not act soon, he may 
have a hurKJred or more pirate systems 
challenging existing activity. A 
hundred repealer wars. Then an Idea 
hits him . . . CTCSS! "Why not?" he 
says to himself. "Why not ^sign all 
existing activity of open repeaters a 
given areawirie CTCSS tone, and then 
assign a second tone and the necessity 
for a lockout receiver to all the next 
generation of repeaters - and then 
coordinate them atop one another?!'' 
In essence, all existing systems would 
become primafy channel activity, and 
any new system could only operate 
when existing activity of the initially 
coordinated system ceased. Now^ it 
might not work for every channel 
pair, but it would be fine for those of 
low activity- In fact, you could 
possibly put six or seven per channel, 
With each assigned a different tone 
and each required to lock out when it 
heard any other tone of any system of 
an earlier coordination date. 

Okay, there are obvious pitfalls to 
such a system. The largest is getting 
any group of hams to agree totally to 
anything. With ever-mounting pressure 
on urban area coordinators and 
councils, however, do not be too 
surprised to see something along these 
lines in the not- too-distant future. 
Note that many of the new radios 
coming to the marketplace have tor* 
coding built in — or at least a pro- 
vision for it Do the manufacturers 
Imow something that the rett of us 

don't? 

Let's finish this by putting this 
myth to rest forever. It is r^t tone 
coding that makes a repeater '^closed" 
or "private/" but rather the attitude 
of the people who own and use it. If 
tone coding has one asset, it is that of 



a "sign" Or "symbol" that states to 
the rest of the world that it is for use 
by and for members only. 

What about the fourth category, 
the aforementioned "individually 
owned and operated, remotely- 
controlled amateur base station 
radio"? How does it differ from a 
repeater, and why is there a rather 
phenomenal growth lately in the 
number of these systems? Statement 
of fatrt: A remote base Is not a 
repeater. The only similarity lies in 
the hardware, and that is where the 
similarity ends. The root structure is 
"simplex ability using relay tech- 
nique." Suppose you tived in a bad 
spot for direct station-to-staiion com- 
municationSv but for some reason did 
not want to u^ a repeater to com- 
municate. In fact, you wanted the 
total flexibility of your base station 
radio, with the added ability of long 
distance communication. You could 
relocate atop a mounuln, but is it not 
better to just move your radio atop a 
mountain and then operate through it 
by remote control? In its purest form, 
that is exactly what a remote base is. 
However, today's modern remote 
base is far and away a lot more than 
that Firstn if you can put a two meter 
downfink radio on the hill, why not 
six, 220, or 10? Why not 160 through 
10 on CW and/or SSB, as well? Why 
not an autopatcb function? How 
about the ability to "swing" a tri-band 
beam or remotely tune in single kHz 
steps all of the low bands? Remember, 
unlike a repeater, whose licensee has a 
specific responsibility to a given user- 
ship, a remote base rs technically 
individually owned. Therefore* the 
licensee can do things with it that 
might bring chaos to the average open 
repeater. With a remote rather than a 
repeater, the owner Is totally free to 
experiment and operate to bis heart's 
content - and never once worry 
about the responsibilities that an ama- 
teur njnnlni a repeater for a given 
usership has. I suspect that it is this 
overall total freedom that is respon- 
sible for the dramatic growth in such 
systems. 

While by law an individual by him 
self must own a remote (in the eyes of 
the Commissi on J. this does not mean 
that there's always one remote per 
ham. While a good number of single 
owner/user systems abound, al least 
an equal number are organized as 
closed membership amateur communi- 
cations organizations. These organiza- 
tions, usually numbering no more 
than ten individual amateurs, are very 
closely knit, and in virtually every 
case are made up of individuals of 
exceptional skill in the art of two-way 
VHF/UHF communications. 

I said earlier that a remote is a 
"simplex" device using relay tech- 
nique. Taking this further, most re- 
motes come into being because an 
individual or group is interested ir\ 
expanding their ability to talk without 
the aid of a repeater They do not 
want the restrictions of "3- minute 
timers" and of having their QSOs 
Interrupted every two minutes by 
breakers, They want the same ability 
from their mountain as they have 
from their home ham shack. By 
utilizing the concept of the remote 



base, they achieve their individual 
objective. At present, there are wn 
estimated 300 or more such systems 
in this area alone; hardly a day goes 
by without running into someone who 
tells you that he is building one also. I 
might be wrong, but I would be 
willing to venture a guess and say that 
the modern remote base is possibly 
the fastest growing of all forms of 
amateur relay communications cur- 
rently to be found out here. 

THE GOOD GUY 

While back east a while ago, one of 
my scheduled stops was at Clegg 
Communications in Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, both to see Ed again 
and to do a "Manufacturer Profile" 
story for this magazine. It was about 
90 miles to Lancaster from Valley 
Stream, Long Island, where I w^ 
staying, so early that particular 
morning I nndde a bee line into 
Brooklyn to pick up Larry Levy 
WA2iNM, who wws to act as my 
photographer. The two of us then 
headed toward Lancaster in my 
father-in law's 73 TBird. 

By five that afternoon, we were 
ready to head back to New York, We 
bid goodbye to Ed and his staff, and 
jumped back into the car. It started 
fine, but when we placed it into 
"drive," we found that it had decided 
that Et liked Lancaster a lot and 
wanted to remain. The transmission 
had died — or so we itiought. Not 
knowing exactly what to do, Larry 
snd t ran back into Ed's office just as 
he was about to depart. We explained 
our plight a'ld in short order Ed had 
literally solved every problem for us. 
First, he found us an auto mechanic 
who later turned out to be one of the 
most righteous individuals I have ever 
run into. Then, though he had a rather 
important dinner and meeting to 
make, he personally took the time to 
take us around and help us find 
transportation back to NYC. finally 
dropping us at the airport in Lan- 
caster. We had hoped to make a com^ 
muter flight to Philadelphia and then 
grab either TWA or Amefk;an back lo 
JFK, As luck would hawe it, the 
commuter flight (which was the last 
one) was a sellout, but National Car 
Rental came through with an OI<te 
Cutlass that got us back to the *'Big 
Apple" in fine fashion by midnight. 

!f "LW" could give a "good Samari- 
tan" award, my first nomination 
would be Ed Ctegg W3L0Y. He did 
not have to go out of his way for us. 
Even though he had important 
appointments to keep, an act of 
human kindness to a friend he deemed 
more important. Both Larry and I 
probably will never find the proper 
words with which to say thanks. We 
both hope that this is a proper begin- 
nir^g. This being my first trip to the 
Lancaster area. I was quite at a loss 
when the situation arose; halving some- 
one extend a warm hand of friendship 
at that moment was very welcome 
indeed. 

THE BIG LINK 
What do repeater stations WR5AFS 
in Houston, Texas, and WR6AWQ in 
Los Angetes have in common? What 




ivent did repeater stations WR6AWS 
and WR6AAE also share in part? 
Answer: probably the record tor the 
longest duration repeater interlink be- 
tween tvw* cities separated by over 
1.000 miies. Would you believe three 
hours and forty -two minutes? Not 
that this record is important- More so 
Is what happens after the initial shock 
of a two thousand mile link wears off. 

I have been involved, in one way or 
another, in linking efforts before. In 
fact, one of the very first, between 
Waltham, Mass., and Los Angeles 
{about five years ago), was a direct 
result of an offer by one of our local 
repeater owners to try such an experi- 
ment that was printed in one of the 
earliest "LW* columns. Not long ago, 
we reported on Sam Davis 
WA1GQY/6 and his ''Linking 
America/' vrfiich at last report is still 
going fairly strong. However, most of 
the latter consisted of people at both 
ends exchanging callsigns. salutations, 
and requests for OSL cards, 

WR6AWQ and WR5AFS are quite 
different from one another WBBAFS 
is an open repeater located in 
Houston, with about 70 to 100 
regular users. It is a two meter system, 
sponsored by an organization known 
as the Houston ECHO Society. 
WR6AWQ, on the other hand, is a 
private 220 MHz system that is itself 
part of an oi^anization called West- 
link, the objective of which Js to 
organize a network of autonomous 
inlertied repeaters to provide state- 
wide communication. As 1 mentioned 
earlier in this ra>luma a good number 
of such organizations exist. With the 
differences in operational category 
and format betiween the two, vtfhat 
would you imagine the outcome to 

be? 

It was, for afl participating, one of 
the most fascinating and educational 
evenings ever spent. After "initial 
shock," which lasted for about a half 
hour, one tjegan to realize that QSO 
after QSO was taking place - 
meaningftjl QSOs, ir> which everything 
from system operation to things of a 
far more human nature were being 
discussed. It was a Sunday evening, 
arkd the Houston group had been 
involved in their v«ekly net as the 
link started. For pan of the linkup, 
the Los Angeles AWQ group took part 
in a net in a city a couple of kilomiles 

away! 

What happens, then, when you link 
two repeaters? People talk, and out of 
this gain a far better understanding of 



t9 



their fellow man than they could 
whefi isolated by the coverage restric- 
tions of sn avera^ repeater . Botfi 
SYStems are eager to do it again. If 
yqor system Is interested m linkmg 
with either or both, drop me a note, 
arid 111 ad 3sa deann^batise and pass 
it on to the proper party. WR5AFS 
and vyR6AWQ may hold the current 
record for the longest mpeater inter- 
link, but I suspect that they also 
might account for the greatesl number 
of new friendships evolving from ama- 
teur radio fn one evening, 

220 IS ALIVE, WELL. 
AND GROWING IN HOUSTON 

Accord ifig to Kent Marshall 
WSTXV, six months 390 there were 
about ten intrepid ^uts in the 
Houston, Texas, area who were 
playmg around on 220. What a dif- 
ference a few monihs can n^ake. At 
prisent, there are over fifty amateurs 
now on 220, and an experimental 
npeeter h operating on the high 
.34/.94 pair, under the callsign 
WR5ATG. Kent credits this growth to 
two factors; the Clegg FM 76. and a 
gentleman named Doug Burns 
W5FIJH, who is spearheading 220 
growth. In Texas, as here In California 
and elsewhere, amateurs have come to 
like 220 because k is still uncrowded. 
Even via a repeater, one can hold a 
true conversation - a feat which is 
fast becoming impossible on two \n 
many places. How long this will hold 
true is anyone's guess, since 220 seems 
to really be taking off. Here in 
southern California, the last of the 
available 220 pairs w^ recently co- 
ordinated, and now Tom Rutherford 
W6NUt artd his SCR A 220 Technical 
Committee are involved in multiple 
co-chan ne I coord i n at i ons. N i neteen 
such coordinations have already been 
made, with many more expected to 
follow. 

In Texas, 220 is growing, and if 
what I hear about Texans is true, I 
suspect that 220 will get the ''Big 
Texas Treatment" that has helped two 
to grow aiKi prosper. Amateurs have 
headed the call of "220 - Use It Or 
Lose Ul", »id while we must never be 
complacent i have a sneaky feelir^g 
that Class E CB would find it quite 
hard to manifest itself up there in 
quite a few places, contrary to what 
certain ElA-onented information 
might say. Good work. Texas! 

SOUTH CENTRAL U.S. MAY 

ADOPT CALIFORNIA 

TERTIARY PLAN 

While no official announcement has 
been made as of this writing, ac- 
cording to informed sources the Texas 
VHF'FM Society, along with coordi- 
nating groups from Tennessee, 
Missis ppi, Loursiana, Oklahoma^ and 
New Mexico, will shority announce 
formal adoption of the Modified 
SCR A Inverted Tertiary Plan for 
iplil'Splii repeaters. This would signify 
two things. First that interest in VHF 
relay communications among ama- 
teurs continues to grow, and thus a 
need to expand the number of avail- 
able channels has reached these areas 
of the nation. Second, It signifies that 
endorsement of this plan by the 



ARRL *n a recent OSF article on the 
subject (October. 1976, pp. 47, 43) 
has had a profound effect on its 
acc^tance by the amateur com- 
munity* 

It is my sinc«rest hope that these 
areas have as much sjccess with this 
plan as we have in southern California 
The AftRL has stated that the best 
chance of technical success seems to 
come through this method, and I 
think our overaii success during the 
past three years has shown this 10 be 
true. The SCRA still has available a 
technical paper written by Sob Thorn- 
berg WB6JPI on this subbed, and an 
S% X 1 1 SASE with a bit of patience 
on your part will bring a copy. Send 
your request to SCRA, PO Box 2606, 
Culver City CA 90230. Though 
written iliree years ago^ the concepts 
contained therein are a& practical to- 
day as they were then. They me the 
basis for a good part of this area's 
successful ct«?rdi nation effort. 

TSARC CARES 

As you are already aware, in May 1 
was back east, I happened to show up 
at just the right time. Well, to be 
truthful. I had been made aware 
beforehand by Dave IVIinot WA2EXP, 
TSARC chairman, that the Tri -State 
Amateur Repeater Council would be 
hoiding an open general membership 
meeting. Dave extended a personal 
invitation for me to attend and meet 
^die group. 

What intrigued me was a discussion 
underway when 1 vrived. It deaU with 
a matter very close to my heart: 
willful and malicious interference to 
amateur relay communications by the 
"sickies" of this world. Now. nothing 
new came of this discussion. What in 
my mind may be precedent-settina, 
though. Is the fact that a repeater 
council had felt it was irt the interest 
of ail amateurs to involve themselves 
in some way in trying to solve this 
problem, Maybe for the first time 
ever, such a body was saying "we've 
had enough" and vvas beginning to 
turn their heads tovirard finding a way 
to take action. I personally wish them 
all the success in the world, and 
pledge to do anything in my power to 
aid them or anyone else so inclined- 

Their structure is a bit different 
from that of the SCR A, and perhaps a 
bit of comparison is warranted. As 
you may be aware, the SCRA's chair- 
man appoints two Technical Com- 
mittee heads, one for two meters and 
one for 220, who in turn form tech- 
nical committees whose makeup is 
representative of each geographic area 
administered by the parent organ! ra- 
ti on. The committees discuss all co- 
ordination requests, evaluate them for 
technical merit and compatibility with 
existing activity, and assign or deny 
coordination by majority vote, 

The TSARC. hov^rever, has an in- 
dividual coordinator. He makes such 
decisions, based on the same criteria, 
and works with the organization 
proper on sort of an "advise and 
consent" basis. As I understand it. the 
overall responsibility for the imple- 
mentation of hts rulings rests with the 
council itself. The council also retains 
the prerogative to override the co» 



ordinator's decisions, request reevalua^ 
tion, and/or implement a decision of 
its own. 

Which system works better? 1i*s 
hard to say. Each fiu the overall r*eeds 
of an area, and each has proven to be 
successful Each has its own form of 
control and restraints buitt in, and 
each affords representation to any and 
all systems that request and require 
such. As Dave said to me, "Duke 
Harrison has been doing such an over- 
whelm in gly successful job that there is 
no reason to change things/' 

Everyone I met seemed satisfied 
with the structure of the TSARC and 
with the dedication that they have 
shown to that area's relay commumca- 
tions needs. They also care a lot about 
what's happening and where vM ar« 
heading. If they were to adopt a 
motto, I guess it would be "Technical 
Competence With An Eye Toward 
Tomorrow/' 

10 METER NON-RELAY SAND 

PLANNING COUNCIL FORMED 
According to Norm Lefcourt 
W6IRT, the large and continually 
growing nurnber of amateurs in 
southern California who are con- 
verting CB radios to channeiized 10 
meter activity, after evaluating all of 
the band plans offered, have con- 
cluded that what they originated late 
fast year is best. They have now begun 
to form a council for the purpose of 
implementing this on a wider scale. 

It was felt by 10 meter interests 
in this area that with all tfie band 
plans that have been proposed, and 
with everyone taking off in different 
directions as was the case before the 
days of repeater councils for relay 
communications, some organization 
has to be formed for voluntary 
coordination of 10 meter non-relay 
channelized operation. I spoke with 
Norm the other morning via WR6AB1M 
and on .52 simplex, and he told me 
that a pilot organization has been 
formed and thai they would soon be 
holding an open meeting to adopt a 
tide, construct a constitution and 



bylaws, and formalize the organize- 
tiort. 

As I have been led to understand^ 
this organization intends to adopt ttie 
souths'n California 10 meter band 
plan whtch was presented earlier in 
this magazme, and possibly coordinate 
specific fonrn of activity or utility to 
each channel. It's too early to even 
surmise the kind of impact that this 
will have on the future of non-relay 
operation on 10 meters - and on 
non-FM operation as well. One thing 
Is sure, though: 10 meters AlVI is 
possibly the biggest thing to hit the 
southland since the two meter re- 
peater. It was only a matter of time 
until some form of organization to 
direct its growth took root out here. 



WHEN ALL ELSE FAILS, 
TRY MY ANSWERING MACHINE 

Take this number down, jf you 
have something that you feel tfie rest 
of your peers may be interested in but 
don't have the time to write a letter, 
you can place a call anytime, 24 hours 
a day, to my unofficial "LW" hotline 
at (805) 259-8243. One catch, 
though; IVly machine wilt only take a 
fifteen second message^ If you plan to 
caM in. I suggest that you write down 
what you intend to say and then edit 
it to the most necessary information. 
Start with your name and callsign 
when yoM hear ttie first "beep/' and 
stop wtien you hear the second 
"beep/' I will try to send you a 
postcard within a few days to confirm 
the receipt of the information. 

One such piece of information that 
came to me via "Elmo" (the pet name 
for our answering machine) is this^ 
passed on from Oliver W7WEW to 
K6UQJ via Westcars and then via 
phone to me. It concerns a brand new 
repeater system sen/ing the ar^ 
around Prescott, Arizona, from a 
point 7800 feet up atop Mingus 
Mountain. Its callsign is WR7AFC, its 
channel pair is t4?.60 \n/\47,Q0 out, 
and it's open for all to use. 



AMSAT 



A MS AT has received Circular No. 
1273 dated July 12, 1977, of the 
International Telecommunication 
Union's International Frequency 
Registration Board giving advance 
publication information on a planned 
amateur satellite network of the 
USSR- The published information is 
su m m ar i zed below. 

Generaf Informmion: 'The USSR 
Administration wishes to inform 
countries, members of the ITU, that 
the USSR is working on ttie establish ■ 
meni of an amateur -satellite service 
system. This system 'RS' will be based 
on 3-4 ratellites on a circular near- 
polar orbit. The amaietsr satellite sta- 
tions m^ designed for multiple aoces 
with re-transmission and freciuency 
translation without demodulation on 
a reai time scale/' 

Date of bringing into ustr: 
1977-1078. 

Number of satefhtes.' 3-4. 



Orbits! information: lnclinatk>n, 
82""; Altitude of apoi^ & perigee, 
950 km {circular orbit}; perked, 102 
minutes. 

Uptmk charactmstics: 145.8-145.9 
MHz nOO kHi bandwidth); quarter- 
wave receiving antenna, circularly 
polarized; user upiink power, 10-15 
Watts to 10-12 dB antenna; trans- 
ponder receiver noise temperature, 
3000" K. 

Downiiftk cfiarBcteristics: 23.3-29.4 
MHz ftOQ kHz bandwidth); haff wave 
transmitting ant^na, circularly polar- 
ized; transponder power, T5 Watts 
peak to dB gain antenna. 

Max I mum communicmions dis* 
ranee: 6,000 km (3,700 st. mL). 

From the advar>ce publication 
orbital information, it seems likely 
that the "RSOSCARs'* will be 
launched piggyback with the Meteor 
meteoro logical satellites from the 
Plesetsk launch site. 



20 




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H2 



21 



Editor: 

Robert Sak&r WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 



VK/ZL/OCEANI A CONTEST 

Phone 

Starts: 1000 GMT 

Saturday, October 1 

Ends: 1000 GMT 

Sunday, OctobeT 2 

CW 
Starts: 1000 GMT 
Saturday, Octotier 8 
Ends: 1000 GIVIT 
Sunday, October 9 
Sponsored by the Wireless Institute 
of Australia. Entry ctassificatians: 
single trarismitter-single op, multi-op 
(outside VK/ZLoniy). 
EXCHANGE: 

RS{T} plus serial number starting at 
001. 
SCORING: 

Oceania stations score 2 points per 
OSO with VK/2L, 1 point for QSQ 
with Oceania other than VK/ZL. All 
other stations score 2 points per 
VK/ZL QSO, t point per Oceania 
(other than VK/2L) QSO, Final score 
is derived by multlpiying total QSO 
potnts by the sum of VK/ZL call areas 
worked ort all bands. The same 
VK/ZL call area worked on different 
bands counts as a separate multiplier. 
ENTR iESANDA WA RDS: 

Logs must show, in this order: 
date/time in GMT, callsign of station 
contacted, band, serial number sent/ 
received. Under fine each new VK/ZL 
caEI area contacted and make separate 
logs for each band. Summary sheet 
must show callsign, name, address 
(please use block letters), details of 
equipment used, and for each band — 






QSO points for that band and total of 
VK/ZL cat I areas worked on that 
band All band score will be total QSO 
points multiplied by sum of VK/ZL 
call areas on all bands while single 
band scores will be that band's QSO 
points multiplied by VK/ZL call areas 
worked on that band only. Attractive 
colored certificates will be awarded 
top scorers. Vou may obtain contest 
results and next year's rules by en- 
closing one IRC or mint stamps of 
your country to value of one IRC. 
Certificate winners will receive results 
and next year's ruies regardless. Send 
entries to; WiA-VK/ZL Contest 
Manager, GPO Box 1002, Perth, 6001, 
Western Australia, or WIA-VK/ZL 
Contest Manager, N. Penfold VK6Ne, 
388 Huntriss Road, Woodlands. 6018, 
Western Australia — posted to reach 
Australia before Jan. 3K 



OCTOBER QRP QSO PARTY 

Starts: 2000 GMT 

Saturday, October 8 

Ends; 0200 GMT 
Monday, October 10 
Sponsored by the QRP Amateur 
Radio Club Internationai Inc., this 
contest is open to all amateurs and all 
are eligible for awards. Stations can be 
worked once per band; general call is 
CQQRPDE. , . 
FREQUENCtSS: 

CW - 3540, 7040, 14065, 21040, 
2B040. SSB - 3855. 7260. 14260, 
21300, 23600. Novice - 3720, 7120, 
21120, 28040. All frequencies ± 5 







Oct 1 
Oct 1-2* 
Oct 1-2 
Oct 8-9 
Oct 8-9 
Oct 8-10 
Oct 12-13 
Oct 15-16 
Oct 15-16 
Oct 15-17 
Oct 22 23 
Oct 22-23 
Oct 29-30 
Nov 3-4 
Nov 5-6 
Nov 5-6 
Nov 12-13 
Nov 1213 
Nov 12-13 
Nov 13 
Nov 19-20 
Nov 19-20 
Nov 19-20 
Nov 26-27 
Dec 3-4 
Dec 10-11 



Open CD Party - CW 

California QSO Party 

VK/ZL/Oceania - Phone 

VK/ZUOceania-CW 

BSGB 21/28 MHz Phone Contest 

Qctolaer QRP QSO Party 

YLRL Anniversary CW Party 

Open CD Party — Phone 

RSGB 7 MHz Phone Contest 

Manitoba QSO Party 

CQ WE Contest 

CABTG RTTY Sweepstakes 

CQ WW DX Phone Contest 

YLRL Anniversary Phone Party 

ARRL Sweepstakes - CW 

BSGB 7 MHz CW Contest 

tPA Contest 

European DX Contest - RTTY 

Missouri QSO Party 

OK DX Contest 

ARR L Sweepstakes — Phone 

WWDXA International CW Contest 

All Austria Contest 

CQ WW DX CW Contest 

ARRL 160 Meter Contest 

ARRL 10 Meter Contest 

Oascribed in last issue. 



KHz to avoid QRM, as license permits. 
EXCHANGE: 

Members send RS(T), state, prov- 
ince, or country, and QRP number. 
All others send RSITl, state, province, 
or country, and power mput, 
SCORiNG: 

Each member QSO counts 3 points, 
non-members count 2 points per QSO, 
stations other than W/VE count as 4 
points. Multipliers based on input 
power of transmitter: greater than 
100 Watts - x1; 25 to 100 Watts - 
x1.5; 5 to 25 Watts - x2; 1 to 5 Watts 
— x3; less than 1 Watt — x5. Total 
score is QSO points times total num- 
ber of states or provinces or countries 
per band times power multiplier. 
ENTR tES AND A WA RDS: 

Certificates to highest scoring sta- 
tion in each state, province, or coun- 
try, other places depending on 
activity. One certificate for the station 
showing three "skip^" contacts using 
the lowest power. Send full log data, 
including full name, address, and 
bends used, plus equipment, antennas, 
and povi^r used. Entrants desiring 
results please enclose a #10 SASE. 
Logs must be received by Nov. 30 to 
quality. Send all entries to: QRP ARC 
Contest Chairman, E. V. Sandy Siaire 
W5TVW, 417 Ridgewood Drive, 
Metairie LA 70001. 



MANITOBA QSO PARTY 

Starts: 2200 GMT 

Saturday, October 16 

Ends: 0200 GMT 
Monday, October 17 

Sponsored by the Amateur Radio 
Clubs of Manitoba and dedicated to 
ARLM (Amateur Radio League of 
Manitoba^ to commemorate their 
25th anniversary in 1977. Stations 
may be worked once per band and 
mode, VE4 mobiles can be worked 
ea:h time they change municipalities, 
ARLM members will be bonus 
stations for out of province contacts. 
VE4 to VE4 and 2 meter simpler 
QSOs will be permitted, 
EXCHANGE: 

RS(T), name, QTH (municipality 
for VE4J, 
SCORiNG: 

VE4s multiply number of QSOs 
times number of US states, VE 
provinces, and DX countries. All 
others multiply number of QSOs 
times number of Manitoba munici- 
palities, local government districts, 
provincial parks, and forest reserves 
(!34 max.) times the number of 
ARLM members worked, 
FREQUENCiES: 

SSB - 3770, 3905. 7195, 7230, 
14190, 14235, 21245, 21355,28600. 
CW - 3705, 7105, 14065, 21205, 
28205. 
ENTRIES AND AWARDS: 

Certificates to high score in each 
province, state, and country. Plaques 
for high VE4 and high out of province 
station. Additional plaques if war- 



ranted. Send tog data and signed 
declaration no later than Nov. 14 to: 
Doug Bowles VE4QZ, 1104 First 
Street, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada 
R7A2Y4. 



CO WE CONTEST 
October 22 and 23 

See schedule for times and frequen- 
cies! 

Sponsored by the Murray Hill ARC, 
the contest is open to all licensed 
amateurs employed by or retired from 
Western Electric, Bell Labs, and Tele- 
type Corp. Also, participation of 
employees and retirees of AT&T and 
AT&T Long Lines is permitted. The 
contest IS divided Into four sessions 
with a total allowed operating time of 
20 hours. A separate QSO may be 
made with a station on each of three 
modes — phone, CW, and RTTY. No 
form of cross mode, cross band, or 
repeater operation will be permitted. 
There is nothing in the rules to 
prohibit operation outside of the sug- 
gested schedule, but it is hoped that 
by using the schedule as a guide, many 
more QSOs will be made by knowing 
when and where to listen, If con- 
ditions do not favor a particular band 
called for in the schedule, participants 
are tree to move elsewhere, preferably 
to the next band scheduled. However, 
please observe the contest time 
periods. Each station must be 
operated by a single operator with a 
single transmitter. Club stations 
operated under the club station call- 
sign may compete to submit a score 
for that location's total These con- 
tacts may not, however, be counted 
toward an Individual's personal score. 
Successive contacts with the same 
station may not be made by changlnrj 
mode! Violation of any rules of this 
contest, or any of the current FCC 
rules and regulations governing ama- 
teur radio service, can result in dis- 
qualification of the station involved. 
EXCHANGE: 

RS(T), name, location code. A loca- 
tion shall be counted once for each 
band for which that location is 
worked in each of the three contest 
sections* 
SCORING: 

Contacts with a Novice or Tech- 
nician on an HF or CW Novice band 
will count 10 points; contacts with a 
retiree will count 5 points; all other 
contacts count 1 point. 
ENTRiES: 

All logs must be in GMT and should 
be forwarded to your local "Works 
Coordinator" as soon as possible after 
the contest. They should be to your 
coordinator no later than Nov, IS, All 
local coordinators should forward 
their location summary and log sheets 
to reach Murray Hill by Dec. IB. In 
order to create an incentive to get 
your logs in, you may add 10 points 
to your score if you sign a statement 
that your entry was forwarded to 



22 



TIME AND FREQUENCY SCHEDULE FOB CO WE CONTEST 

Session One: HFA/HF Phone - 1700 to 2200 UTC DcL 22. 1977 
Suggested operation: 

VHF/lSOmetars 
10 meters 
15 meters 
20 meters 
40 melBfs 



1700 13Q0 
18001900 
1900 2000 
2000 2100 

2100-2200 



Session Two: HF/VHF CW and RTTY - 2300 UTC Oct. 22 to 0400 UTC Oct. 23, 197? 
Sugges^ted operation: CW on the hour, RTTV on tfie half hour, 

2300-0000 20 meters 

OOOOQIDO 40 meters 

0100^0200 VHP/ 160 meters 

0200-0300 80 meters 

0300-0400 BO meters 

Session Three: HF/UHF CW and RTTY - 1700 to 2200 UTC OcL 23, 1977 
Suggested operation : CW on the hour^ RTTY on the half hour. 
1 700 1 800 VH F/160 meters 

1800-1900 10 meters 

1900^2000 15 meters 

2000-2100 20 meters 

2100-2200 40 meters 

Session Four: HF/VHF Phone - 2300 UTC Oct. 23 to 0400 UTC Oct. 24, 1977 
Suggested operation; 

20 meters 
40 meters 
VHF/160 meters 
80 meters 
80 meters 



2300-0000 
0000-01 00 
0100-0200 
9200-0300 
0300-0400 



Suggested frequencies: 

Bend CW 

160 Use segment permittBd locally 

80 »iC^3570.3730 

40 7040-7080.7130 

20 14040 14050 

15 21040-21080,21140 

10 28150 

6 50.1 S0J3 

2 145.05-145.1 



BTTY 



Phone 



3605 


3800-3950 


TOSS 


72607300 


14080 


14280-14330 


21095 


21380-21420 


2S150 


2S67S 


50.1-50.13 


50;1 50.13 


145.05-145.1 


145.0S145,11, 146.52 



your local works coordinator before 
Tuesday, Nov. 1. 

CARTG RTTY SWEEPSTAKES 

Starts: 0200 GMT 

Saturday, October 22 

Ends: 0200 GMT 
Momlay, October 24 

Sponsored by the Cariddian Ama- 
teur Radio Teletype Group, VE3RTT. 
Not more than 30 houi^ of operation 
is permitted, with rmn-operating 
periods taken at any time during the 
contest, Summafy of times on and off 
fnu5t be submitted with score. Use all 
amateur bands authorized for F1 
emission (RTTY J. Country status as 
per ARRL country list; KL7, KH6, 
and VO to be considered as separate 
countries. Classes of entry include: 
single op. single transmitter; mult top, 
single transmitter; and SWL printer* 
Individual operators of multi-operated 
stations may submit their logs singly 
instead of a group log, 
EXCHANGE: 

Messages will consist of message 
number, time in GMT, and zone. 
SCO^mG: 

All 2-w3y RTTY QSOs with own 
2one will earn 2 points; all others as 
per CARTG zone chart (send SASi if 
needed). Stations may not be con^ 
lactid more than once on any one 
band. Multiplier is number of differ- 
ent countries contacted including 
one^s own on each band, Each US and 



VE district also counts as a separate 
country. Total score h total number 
of exchange points times number of 
countries worked times number of 
continents (6 max.}. Canadian bonus 
points to be added last — TOO bonus 
points for each VE/VO contact on all 
bands, 

EMTRiESAND AWARDS: 

Use separate log sheet for each 
band. Log sheets and zone cfiarts 
available from CARTG for SASE or 
IRCs. Logs must be received before 
December 31 to qualify, En^aved 
pJaques to top 10 scorers plus 6 
special categories. Certificates to top 
scorers in each US and VE/VQ district 
and each country. Send logs, sum- 
mary, and scores to: CARTG — 
VE3RTT, 85 Fifeshire Rd,, Willow- 
dale, Ontario. Canada M2L 2G9, 

CO WORLDWIDE DX CONTEST 

Starts: 0000 GMT 

Saturday, October 29 

Ends ^ 2400 GMT 
Sunday, October 30 
Sponsored by CQ Magazine, the 
contest is open to aii amai£urs world- 
wide. Use all amateur barKfs. 160 
throuf^ 10 meters. Entry classifica- 
tions include: single op, single and all 
band; mutti-op (atl bpnd), single or 
multi-transmitter, 
EXCHANGB: 

RS(T) and ?one. 
SCORING: 



Contacts between stations on 
different continents count 3 points; 
stations on same continent but differ- 
ent countries 1 point, except for 
North American stations only I — 
contacts between stations within 
North Anverican boundaries count 2 
points. Contacts between stations tn 
the same country are permFtted for 
zone or country muttiptier credit, but 
have zero point value. MuKi pliers are 
number of different zones on each 
band and different countries on each 
band. Final score Is result of totat 
GSO points multiplied by sum of zone 
and coumry multiplier 

ENTRIES AND A WA RDS: 

Many various awards in different 
classes and categories. Plaque to 
highest club score. Logs should in- 
clude all times in GMT; indicate zone 
and country multipliers only first time 
worked on each band. Logs must be 
checked for duplicate contacts; use 
separate sheets for each band. Each 
entry must be accompanied by a 
sjmmary sheet showing all scx^ring 
information, category of com pet it kin, 
name and address in block leitei^, and 
a signed declarartion that all contest 
rules and regulations have been ob- 
served. OfficiaJ logs and summary 
sfieets and zone maps are available 
from CO; include a large SASE. All 
entries must be postmarked no later 
than Dec. 1 for phone and Jan. 15 for 
CW. Send logs to: CQ WW Contest 



Committee, 14 Vanderventer Avenue, 
Port Washington, LI. NY USA 1 1050. 
Check CQ Marline for any last 
minute rule char^gesl 



ISLANDS OF THE WORLD 
AMATEUR RADIO ACNlEVEiyiENT 

AWARD 

Sponsored by amateurs reiki ing on 
Whidbey Island, the award is availsbte 
to all licensed amateurs in the world. 
AM contacts must be made after 
October 1, 1977! The award will be 
issued for: 50 islands, including con- 
tact with Whtdbey Island; 100 Islands, 
including contact with Whidbey 
Isfand; 150 islands, including contact 
with Whidbey Island; maximum 
possible, including contact whh 
Whidbey Island* 

Isleods are taken from the "prefix 
by countries tist^' as they appear in 
the Radio Amat&ur Cadbook, with the 
exception of Whidbey Island. Each 
island must also be recognized as such 
by the National Geographic Society. 
To obtain the award, proof of contact 
must be submitted on a self -prepared 
list showing the island's name, callsign 
of amateur contacted, date of contest. 
This list should be arranged in alpha- 
betical order by island. Do not sencf 
QSL cards I This list must be verified 
by at least two amateurs, General class 
or above^ or by a local radio dub 
secretary. Send your verified list of 
contacts, which must include Whidbey 
Island, St, 00, and a self -addressed 
stamped envelope, to: Bill Gosney 
WB78f K, 4471 40th N.E., Whidbey 
fslfflTd, Oak Harbor WA 90277 USA. 
Foreign amaitetirs may exclude the fee 
and stamps on their return envelopesL 

The rules that govern this award 
wilt be reviewed annually on October 
II 



CARTG MERIT AWARD 
A plaque has been offered for this 
award complete with engraving, and 
the CARTG is requesting narnes of 
suggested qualifiers. The award was 
created in 1967 to be presented 
annually to the radio amateur chosen 
for hts outstanding contribution to 
the art of ^nateur radio teletype 
communications. It need not neces- 
sarily be confined to technical con- 
tributions but recognition of any 
outstanding achievement worldwide: 
experimental work, articles, traffic 
handling, net operation. DX, or any 
other outstanding RTTY achievement. 
Send complete information to: 
CARTG - VE3RTT, B5 Fifeshire Rd., 
Willowdale, Ontario, Canada M2L 
2G9, 



ALL VEA/OOIM RTTY 
The CARTG is also offering a 
certificate to anyone working all 
VE/VO on RTTY. Tf«fe is no charge 
for the award, but QSLs must be 
included wfth the request and will be 
returned. An official of a RTTY group 
or society may inspect and send a 
Sfgned iist of Such OSLs in place of 
sending the actual cards. Send alt 
requests to CARTG - VE3RTT, 85 
Fifeshire Rd., Wiliowdaie, Ontario, 
Canada IV12L 2G9. 



23 



Nei^ Products 



JMR MOBILE-EAR 
CLEAR-1 MICfiOPHONE 

A common problem faced by FM 
^r\d SSB operators is inadequate 
micfophone gain arid directivity. A 
poor mki can make a T&-820 or 
Hy-G^in 3750 sound (ike an early 
phasing rig. Most modern FM trans- 
ceivers employ audio limiting circuits 
which are designed to provide consis- 
tent modulation under differing audio 
conditions. Unfortunately, most 
"stock'' microphones do not have 
sufficient output and the directional 
capability required lo enhance the 
transceiver with which they are "sed. 

This mcHnth I reviewed the Clear- 1 
micr^jphone by JMR Systems Corp. 
The Model 40 mic Is advertised m a 
high output device, capable of driving 
any audio circuit to its fullest extent. 
The mic is also highly directional, 
allowing It to be used in noisy mobite 
environments. 

All it takes is one look at the Model 
40 Cleiar-I to realize thai soinething is 
differenL The microphone is shaped 
like a small [>efringer pistol, v/ith a 
pu^to-talk button on one end. The 
microphone element i$ a capacitor 
device* mounted behind a tiny brass 
screen on the top of the transducer. 
The Model 40 contains a buitt-in FET 
preamp requiring an internal battery, 
and a variable gain control is provided^ 
A five cor^ductor cMe ts used to 
interface the u^r-supplied mk; corv 
nector. Nocmally open and rKwrnally 
closed PTT contacts are available, 
allowing itie Clear- 1 to be used with 
any transceiver. Mic output is a high 
-42 dB, and audio response is 200 600 
H^ . , . most definitely communica- 
tions qyality! The high upper end 
frequency response is responsible for 
the quality "sound" of the Model 40. 
I tested the JMf^ mic with the 
Hy-Gain 3750 transceiver on 20 and 
7S. Good reports were receded - 
with the compressor in the 3750 
disabtedt The output control on the 



mic can be left about one-eighth open 
under normal "dose-talk" conditions. 
I found that it was possible to clip the 
Hy-Gain by ystng excessive mic out- 
put — a 90od audio reserve is present! 
By carefully adjusting the jMR's level 
control, I vvas able to hold the mic at 
arm's length and talk in a normal tone 
... undeteaed by the listening sta- 
tion. 

I hawe a popular 2m SSB transceiver 
in my shack — when I use it with 
those who know me, I am accused of 
having a cold or some other disgusting 
na^ rnalady. The standard mk; 
supplied with thts rig does rtot cut it, a 
classic case of anemic aiudio. This rig 
was the perfect test sltuatton for the 
Model 40 on VHF. I changed micro- 
phone connectors and fired up. 
Amazing - no more Donald Duck 
with the flu I The transceiver sounded 
like its designers had intended, it was 
not po^ible to overdrive the 2m rig, 
probably because the audio li miter has 
good range^ 

The only shortcoming I noted Is the 
lack of VOX capability with the 
Model 40. SirK:e the internal preamp is 
battery powered, tt would have to be 
continuously activated for VOX 
operation- This limitation is under- 
standable when it is considered that 
the Clear- 1 was indeed designed for 
mobite operation, I normally use PTT 
on HF, so it didn't make any dif- 
ference* 

In my opinion, the Mobile- Ear mic 
performed exactly as specified. Us 
performance on VHP was most 
impressive. The mic is light enough to 
survive even the longest "white- 
knuckle"' sessions. It should also be 
indicated that the JMR Clear-t m^cro 
phone is compatible with most C6 
tfansceivers! The microphone is prk:ed 
at S44.&S, JMR Sysiems Corp., f68 
Lawrence Rd., Saiem NH 03079. 

John Molnar WA3ETD 
Ex«cutiv0 Editor 



RADIO SHACK THS'80 
MICROCOMPUTER SYSTEM 

Computers are about lo become a 
pan of everyday life in American 
businesses, schools, and homes* 
according to Radio Shack, the nation 
wide electronics store chain. 

The company has just introduced 
their new Radio Shack TRS ao Micro- 
computer System. Not a kit, the 
TRS 80 comes completely wired and 
tested, ready to plug in and use^ 

The TRS -80 system consists of a 
53' key professional-type keyboard 
and microcomputer plus regulated 
power supply, a data cassette recorder 
which is computer-controlled through 
an interface, and a 12" video display 
monitor. 

A comprehensive owner's manual 
will be supplied with the TRS 80 that 
will explain everything necessary for 
its operation, from plugging it In 
through programming. 

Radio Shack will also supply pre- 
recorded cassette programs for such 
applications as a small business pay- 
roll, general ledger accounting, 
accounts receivabte, and inventory 
control. 

For educational purposes, the 
microcomputef can he used to teach 
mathematics, music theory, and 
virtually any subject through pro- 
girammed teaching methods. 

Just for fun, a variety of game 
programs witi be available, including 
biackjack and backgammon. Other 
uses around the home would be 
personal finance management, storage 
of recipes, menu planning, and use as 
a message center* 

Provisions have been made in the 
TRS-80 for later addition of acc@^ 
sory, or "peripheral," items such as an 
additional tape recorder, "disk" pro- 
gramming, and a printer which would 
creete a permanent^ typed record of 
the computer output. 

At the heart of the Radio Shack 
TBS- 80 Mrcrocomputer System is a 
2-30 microprocessor chip that serves 
as the central processing unit, or 
'*brain/' of the microcomputer. This 
remarkable device, about the size of a 
watermelon seed, is orte of the mcKt 
advanced microprocessor chips avail- 
able today. 



The Radio Shack TRS 80 Micro- 
computer System *s priced at 
S599.95, complete with video display 
monitor and data cai^ette recorder. 
The microcomputer alone will sell for 

S399.95. 

Leading the way in electronics since 
1921, Radio Shack is a division of 
Tandy Corporation (NYSE), head- 
quartered in Fort Worth, TeKas, which 
is also where the TRS 80 is man- 
ufactured. Radio Shack presently hs 
more th^i 6,000 stones and dealers in 
all iO states and Canada, as well as 
nearly 500 stores overseas operating 
under the name Tandy Intemational 
Electronics. Radio Shack, 2617 West 
Seventh Street fort Worth TX 
76 W7. 

FLESHER PS 170 
RTTY PRESELECTOR 

Last month I described the new 
RTTY terminaf unit from Flesher 
Corp., the DM 170. This device has 
considerable built-in filtering which 
allows good isotation of the mark and 
space tones- However, in conditions of 
extreme QRM and noise, additional 
selectivity is required to reliably copy 
RTTY signals. Flesher has responded 
lo this need by providing an active 
niter piBK lector that can be used with 
the DM 170 TU, or any oihef demod- 
ulator. 

The 1^170 filter is connected be- 
tween the receiver's audio output and 
the input of a terminal unit This 
allows narrow shift {170 Hz] tones to 
pass, and not much else. The PS- 170 
has two outputs. The normal output 
couples the filter directly to the TU, 
while the timtter output provides wn 
additional stage of hard limittng, 
which removes amplitude variatiora 
from the received ^gnaL 

The PS- 170 is tiny, tt consists of a 
2** X T* PC board, which can be 
mounted in any existing enclosure. 
Requiring ±15 V dc at 12 mA, the 
PS- 170 can steal power from the 
terminal unit, or may be powered 
from a simple, zener regulated supply. 
I found that the prese lector operMed 
fine on voltagpBs between 12 and 15. 
The 3 dS bandwidth of my f^TTO is 
400 Hz, between the frequency rang© 
of 2000-2400 Hz. This differed 



i 




i 



l**H***'**'*' 




fV 



tU% 



JMR O^r-1 micfophofm. 



The new Radio Shack TRS-80 Microcomputer Syst&m features a bullt-irt 
53-key pmfesstona/-type keyboard and one of the most advanced 
microprocessor cht'fs avBttabte tod^y^ the Z-80. 



24 



slightly from the published frequency 
range oi 2025-2400 Hz. I measiired 
frequency response with an audio 
oscillator ar>d VTVM, using the non^ 
limited output 

Careful tuning is required when 
using the PS- 170, The bandpass is 
stich tfiai even slight mistuninf causes 
the tones to he excessively anenuated. 
However, the reception quality under 
heavy QRM and noise h fantastici I 
used the DM'170 and ST-5 for com- 
parison tests. The PS't70 was 
switched between the two terminaJ 
units, and under conditions of 
extreme interferenee was the dif- 
ference between copying and missing 
weak RTTY siynaK The DM- 170 al- 
ready has bandpass filters tncofpo^ 
rated; the ST-5 does not. Thus, the 
ST-5 benefitted most when the 
PS'170 was used. 1 have since incorpo- 
rated the PS' 170 into the same 
cabinet with the Ftefiher TU. An 
SPOT switch selects either the normal 
or limiting output. 

The PS'170 is available in kit or 
facto rv'bw tit form. The kit takes 
about one half hoor to build and align. 
The components are all resistors, 
capacitors, and ICs. Tune-up is ac- 
complished in the same manner as was 
used in aligning the DM -170. ResistOfS 
are substrtuted into the circijit undl 
the proper response is obtained — the 
op amps require only resistance 
changes to modify the response j^rve 
— no 88 mH toroids to pruRel The 
Flesher PS- 170 is priced at Si 1,95 in 
kit form and SI 8.95 factory as- 
sembled and aligned, ffesher Corpora- 
tion. Box 902. Topeka KS 6660 1. 

John Moinar WA3ETD 
Executive Editor 



NEW PERSONAL COMPUTER 
FROM OHIO SCIENTIFIC 

Challenger IIP from Ohio Scientific 
is an exciting new personal computer 
complete with BASIC in ROM and 
RAM HK) for programs in BASIC. All 
you have to do is turn it on and go! 

Challenger J IP is a fully self-con- 
tained personal compuief with a full 
size keyboard and a 32 x 64 charact^ 
video display interface. 

Complete with an audio cassette 
Interface, the Challenger IIP simply 
connects to a video monitor or home 
TV set via an rf converter (not sup 
plied). A cassette recorder can be used 
fof program storage. 

ChflJlenger IIP comes oomplets with 



a A slot backplane and case for 
$598^00 fully assembled^ and is ex- 
pandable via compatibility with all 
Ohio Scientific computer accessorieSL 
Ohio Sctentific, HftBfn OH 44234, 



GARY IVfODEL 101 DIGITAL 
VOLTMETER KIT 

A complete DVM kit for S29,95? 
You've got to be kiddir^l That's what 
I thought when I received the Gary 
McClellan Model 101 Digital VoW 
meter kit to review. Why not? The 
end result of the kit is a lour digit 
DVM, complete with sign, auto zero, 
and overvokage blanking I 

The DVM market is similar to the 
calculator industry. Several years ago, 
the DVM was an exotic test instru- 
ment found only in electronic labs. 
Capable of extreme accuracy, the 
DVM is based on an LSI A/0 (analog 
to digital) converter. The output of 
the converter Is multiplexed and 
displayed on seven-segment displays, 
exactly as in some digital clocks. The 
price of DVM chips has plunged, aided 
by the mass production of calculator 
and microprocessor chips^ The Gary 
DVM is based upon the Motorola 
MCI 4433 A;D converter, and has a 
b^ic range of 0-± 1.999 volts. 

The Garv DVM took exactly two 
hoors to build sid calibrate. The 
display mounts on a small PC board, 
which is fastened to the larger DVM 
board. All components appear to be 
quality devices, and the CMOS chip* 
are first run units! Mofex pins are used 
to rnoont the DVM chip and two 
other CMOS packages. The four digit 
display is multiplexed to reduce 
power consumption. The associated 
transistors and resistors fbr the display 
require a bit of close wiring, but 
Gary's eleven page manual contains 
detailed instructions and several 
photos of the completed unit. No 
special problems were encountered 
while wiring the kit. 

The most enjoyable part of kit 
building (for me) is applying the juice 
for the first time. It sure is nice when 
things perk right from the openir^g 
gun^ but I was doomed to disappotnt- 
ment this time. The Model 101 re- 
quires B sirvgle fh/e vott supply^ which 
should be regulated. I happened to 
have a little supply based on &n 
LM-309K which was used in micro- 
processor experiments. I connected 
the supply, turned it on, and nothingl 
Then I thought I had better read 




Gary's insiructions. There is a singie 
screwdriver resistor that is used to 
calibrate ttie DVM. My control was all 
the way to one end; thafs why the 
display was dark. Shorting the probe 
leads, i adjusted the control, and sure 
enough, the display illuminated, t 
adjusted for a reading of -000 voJts, 
which is the normal condition with no 
signa} input. The minus sign blinks to 
indicate that the DVM is functioning. 

I should have read further, because 
the next thing I did was connect a 
handy 9 V transistor to the DVM, The 
display btanked out! Again consulting 
ihe manual, it turns out that the 10T 
DVM has a basic range of 0-1.999 
volts. Any overvoltage blanks the 
display — a nice touch! Calibration is 
accomplished by adjusting the control 
until the reading corresponds to a 
known source. I used the Gary Model 
120 DVM calibrator, which I will 
review next month. A good reference 
source is a single mercury cell, which 
has a no load voltage of I.SBvoltSn or 
very nearly that. After calibrating the 
101, I checked my year^Dld nandard 
mercury cell. Not bad, 1.3&2 volts. 
Amazing* 

The 101 DVM has a sicpn function, 
which means the probes do not have 
to be reversed when measuring minus 
voltages It looks like I will have to 
retire my old trusty Knight VTVM — 
boy, I sure hate the constant reversing 
of the polarity switch I 

The only probfem, if you can call it 
a problem, is the low range of the 101 
basic DVM, An attenuator is required 
to measure voltages of greater ma^i- 
lude than 1,999 volts. Gary provide 
an attenuator for his DVM, the Model 
101 1 four range kiL It includes a 
.05% resistor network and switch. The 
accuracy of the basic kit is .05%, so 
make sure to use quality resistors If 
you build your own attenuator. 

All In all, I am very impressed with 
the 101 DVM. Its features are found 
on much more expensive devices, and 
the quality, accuracy, and flexibility 
are hard to beat in a 329.95 kit! It is 
smalt enough to custom mount, and 
can be used as the basis for a complete 
multimeter or digital tuning display^ 
The input impedance ts 1000 megs, 
and it only dravw 80 mA maximum at 
5 yolts. Gary also provides a full line 
of of accessories for the 101 DVM, 



Gary McOeiian Company, 1001 W. 
Imperial Hwy-. U ^abra CA 9m3t. 

John Molnar WA3ETD 
Executive Editor 



HEW SERIES OF FREQUENCY 
SYNTHESIZED TWO METER 
AMATEUR TRANSCEIVERS. 

AJH9LIFIERS. AND ANTENNAS 
FROM HALLICBAFTEES 

Darrel! Fletcher, Chainrtan of th# 

Board of ttie Kal1k:rafter$ Company* 
and Cltff Mathews, Vice President of 
this leading manufacturer of para- 
military and government FM and SSB 
portable and manpack communica- 
tions systems for the international 
market, have announced the introduc- 
tion of a new series of two meter 
transceivers, amplifiers, and antennas 
for the domestic USA amateur market 
and international markets. 

The new series of amateur trans- 
ceivers features a military type fre- 
quency synthesizer for up to BOO 
channel operation in 5 kHz steps in 
the FM mode and digital frequency 
redout for operating on both simplex 
and repeater modes. The all solid stale 
rf power amplifiers provide up to 1/4 
kilowatt power output on FM and up 
to 300 Watts peak envelope power on 
SSB for either base or mobile opera- 
tion. Completing the new equipment 
series is Hallicrafters' new line of two 
meter base and mobile antennas 
having high rf powAr handling 
quahties and featuring a magnet k 
mount mobile antenna for easy irh 
stallation and removal. 

" Hall i craft ers' new tine of two 
meter amateur equipment is a natural 
expansion of Hallicrafters' traditional 
fine of VHF and UHF FM and 
HF-SSB communications products 
sold in international markets," says 
Darrel I Fletcher. "The frequency 
coverage plan features and B kHz 
channel spacing enables the equip- 
ment to be used in any market in the 
world," claims Mathews, who says the 
equipment will be marketed directly 
in ths USA and Canada by selected 
amateur equipment dealers and inter- 
nationally by Hai lie rafters Inter* 
nationaL Inc. 



Contirtij&d on psge 67 




Ohm Scmntific*s new p^non&i computer. Challenger IIP, 



25 



John W. MoJnar WA3ETD 
Executive Editor 



Communicate 

On 10.25 GHz 



-- with a simple transceiver 



Many hams feel that the 
world of amateur 
radio ends at two meters, or 
even twenty in same casesl 
As the frequency increases, 
the amount of commercially 
available g^r diminishes. 
Above 450 MHz, the operator 
must build his equipment — 
little prebuilt equipment is 
around. Thus, the bands 



above 450 are underpopu- 
lated, and misunderstood by 
the majority of hams. 
Possibly you have eyed those 
"microwave" frequencies 
starting at 1 220 MHz . _ and 
wondered how to operate or 
experiment diere, Well^ let's 
see - - , 1 296 might not be 
too bad — you can triple an 
old Motorola transmitter 




Fig. 7. A rear view of the Microwave Associates MAS 7 J 08 
Gunnpfexen The Gann diode is in the cavity under the left 
barrei The tuning varactor diode is under the right barrei 
Electrical tuning control is mounted on the perfboard^ and the 
i-f connection is mible at the top of the rf head. The 
homemade bracket for tripod mounting is attached to the 
lower two bolts. A i4 inch nut is sweat soldered to the bottom 
of the copper flashing. Refer to the text for details. 

26 



strip, and come up with a 
converter for your 2m rig. 
Definitely a project for two 
hams, as it is nice to have 
someone to talk with after 
the construction is done! 
However, if you desire to 
experiment with waveguide, 
horns, and point-to-point 
communicaiions^ the 10.5 
GHz band is the place to go. 

Why 10,5 GHz? The 
possibilities for experimenta- 
tion are endless. If you need a 
true point-to-point link for 
your repeater, microwaves are 
the answer, A low power link- 
can provide reliable control 
for remote bases, with a 
lower long-term cost than 
phone lines! Everyone is 
familiar with police radar, 
which is, incidentally, located 
just above the ham band. 
Experiments with Doppler 
radar are possible on 10 GHz, 

The road to 10 GHz has 
not been easy. Little military 
gear is available, and a ma- 
chine shop is often required 
to build microwave gear. The 
problem of equipment has 
stifled most amateur ventures 
into the world of microwaves. 
However, this problem no 
longer exists! 

Enter the Gunnplexer 

A progressive company in 
Massachusetts has introduced 
a line of microwave gear 
specifically designed for 



amateurs operating on 10,5 
GHz. Microwave Associates, 
Inc., provides a microwave 
transmitter and receiver front 
end in a single package. 
Dubbed the Gunnplexer, this 
device produces 20 mW of 
microwave energy. A portion 
of that energy is coupled to a 
receiving diodej which, in the 
presence of another micro- 
wave signal, produces a low 
frequency i-f signal. The 
Gunnplexer is easily incor- 
porated into a complete com- 
municatiom system. All that 
is needed is a Gunnplexer, i-f 
receiver, and power supply. 
This article describes just 
such a system. This trans- 
ceiver can be used for two- 
way communications on 10,5 
GHz, as a control link, or for 
Doppler effect radar. Before 
startingj let's look at the 
Gunnplexer and discuss its 
operation. 

A Gunn Diode Is the Key 

The Gunnplexer consists 
of five main parts. The heart 
of the rf head is a Gunn 
diode. This diode produces a 
microwave energy directly 
from dc when it is properly 
mounted in a resonant cavity. 
Similar to the familiar tunnel 
diodej the Gunn diode 
exhibits a negative resistance 
region under certain bias 
conditions. Microwave oscitia* 
tions occur in this region. The 
diode employed in the Gunn- 
plexer produces about 20 mW 
at 10 volts. Current drain is 
about 225 mA, Referring to 
Fig. 1, the Gunn diode is 
contained in the left barrel on 
the rear of the rf head. 

The second component of 
the device is a varactor diode^ 
housed in the right barrel, 
next to the Gunn diode. The 
varactor is used to control the 
frequency of the microwave 
radiation. If af modulation is 
applied to the varactor, FM 
will occur. The varactor can 
shift the frequency of the 
Gunnplexer 60 MHz. A 
crystai or other high output 
microphone may be coupled 
directly to the diode — no 
preamp is required on a 
simple system. 

The receive components 



comprise the third and fourth 
areas of the Gunnplexer, A 
tiny portion (about .5 mW) 
of the trafismitted energy 
from the Gunn diode is 
coupled to a microwave 
mixer diode. An i-f signal is 
produced when a received 
signal is heterodyned in the 
mixer. Mixer injection is 
accomplished by a ferrite 
"circulator/' located next to 
the mixer diode (Fig. 3). 
Injection is aJso controlled by 
a screw protruding into the 
body of the Gunnplexer The 
standard i-f frequency used 
by amateurs is 30 MHz, How- 
ever, different i-fs can be 
produced by mechanical and 
electrical tuning of the Gunn- 
plexer. Remember, the trans- 
milted signal aiso provides 
mixer injection! A standard 
FM broadcast receiver can be 
used as the i-f receiver in a 
simple transceiver. More on 
this later [ 

The normal Gunnplexer 
frequencies are 10.250 and 
10-280 GHz. Thus, it can b€ 



seen that the difference 
frequency is 30 MHz, even 
though the local oscillator 
injection is different at each 
end of the communications 
link. 

The last major part of the 
Gunnplexer is, as expected, 

an antenna. The body of the 
Gunnplexer is actually a 
section of UG-39/U wave- 
guide. This guide can be 
bolted to transmission wave- 
guide, or a gain horn antenna 
may be attached. Microwave 
Associates provides a 17 dB 
gain horn for the Gunnplexer 
(Fig, 4), 

Using the Gunnplexer as a 
Transceiver 

A m icrophone, i-f receiver, 
and power supply is required 
to turn a Gunnplexer into a 
complete transceiver for 
10.25 GHz. A well-regulated 
10 volt supply is required for 
the Gunn diode. About 4.5 
volts of bias is needed for the 
varactor to maintain fre- 
quency. The Gunn diode 



f-r ISOMHr) 



eUMKFLEYER 
FROi^T-EKO 




Fig. 3. Big Brother is watching you J This shot shows the mixer 
diode (left) and the ferrite mixer circulator in the waveguide. 
The tuning screw can be seen between the diode and 
circulator, /mcrowave energy is generated in the cavity behind 

the ova! "iriSj " which is visible directly behind the tuning 
screw. The wire extending from the top of the horn is not a 
scratch in the photo^ but rather aground bus mounted on the 
rfhead. 



* 10 REG 



fwf 



^ 




OPTiOflAL 



RF-SO 



l-F-IO.T 
{WIOEBANO! 



VflR ACTOR 

TUNING 
NETWORK 



I-F -45S 

(WlDEBANOl 



AS'I 



n; VOLUME 



FM ir£c£rv£R 

Fig^ 2, Block diagram of the simple Gunnplexer transceiver. 
Details of the bias supply are shown^ m wet! as all intercorh 
nections. This circuit uses VHF Erfgineering receiver strips for 
the receiver i-f and FM detector, A National Semiconductor 
LM-317 regulator chip Is employed to provide the 10 volts 
required by the Gunn oscillator. 



output drifts as temperature 
changes, at a rate of -350 kHz 
per degree Centigrade. Quite 
a drift factor! 

Thusj a change in tempera* 
ture of only a degree will 
move the Gunnplexer fre- 
quency 350 kHz - right out 
of your i-f passband! In some 
cases^ afc is required to 
maintain communications, 
especially when a narrow i-f 
passband is employed. A 
simple transceiver can use a 
voltage divider with the varac- 
tor supply to **tune'* the 
Gunn transceiver. This 
scheme is adequate, especially 
in a system with wideband i-f 



capability. Refer to Fig. 2 for 
details of the bias voltage 
divider. 

The most important 
clement (next to the Gunn- 
plexer) in the transceiver is 
the i-f receiver, A low noise 
figure is required. The if 
channel must also match the 
200 Ohm impedarKe of the 
mixer diode for optimum 
results. Of course, the re- 
ceiver must have an FM 
detector 1 An additional con- 
sideration is the i-f bandpass 
characteristic. If a narrow (10 
kHz) i-f is used, Gunnplexer 
range increases — up to 100 
miles under good conditions! 




Fig, 4. Side view of the Gunnplexer, The 17 dB horn is clearly 
visible^ as well as the tuning control^ cavity, and mounting 
bracl^eL 



27 




Fig, 5, Thei-freceiyer and preamplifier. The wideband VHF Engineering receiver consists of the 
rf module (second from left)^ two TOO kHz 10 J MHz i-f amplifiers^ and an audio amplifier. The 
pot Is the volume control. No squelch is used on my system. A converted OSCAR 30 MHz 
preamp is also illustrated. The rewound toro Id matches the 200 Ohm Gunnpfexer mixer diode. 



However^ as mentioned 
earlier, afc is required on a 
narrowband system- Afc can 
be produced by comparing 
ihe i-f to a standard, and 
using the error voltage to 
tune the varaclor. Addiiional 
details are provided in the 
Microwave Associates 
bulletin, number 7624A- 

A wide I-f passband de- 
creases effective range. How- 
ever, the drift problem is 
eliminated. Range with an i-f 
pass band of 100 kHz is about 
50 miles. As indicated earlier, 
a commercial FM broadcast 
receiver can be used in experi- 
mental systems. The band- 
width of commercial FM 
broadcasting is 150 kHz; thus 
the commercial receiver is a 
viable i-f system. If used, the 
broadcast receiver should 
have a good front end. Pro- 
vision should be made to 
match the receiver's input to 
the Gunnplexer mixer diode. 

My goal was to construct a 
simple i-f receiver that would 
perform in an experimental 
system. 1 also wanted to use 
available parts around the 
shack. Let's see * , , an FM 
receiver, battery operated, 
simple? My first thought was 



an unused VHP Engineering 
receiver once used for 2m 
experiments. The only real 
problems were that the i-f 
was 10,7 MHz, and narrow- 
band at that! I needed a 30 
MHz i-f with a bandpass of 
100 kHz, The first problem 
was solved by building a con- 
verter from International 
Crystal modules. This scheme 
used jn international OF-1 
oscillator with an inexpensive 
OX crystal oscillator, and an 
MXX-1 mixer module. The 
EX crystal provides injection 
at 193 MHz, thus matching a 
10.7 if when 30 MHz is 
present. The only item pur- 
chased was the EX crystal* 

If you try this technique^ 
increase the link coil on the 
MXX-1 several turns to match 
the Gunnplexer. The mixer 
must be mounted as close as 
possible to the mixer diode 
on top of the Gunnplexer. A 
short run of RG-174 coax 
couples the converter to the 
VHP Engineering receiver 
The mixer and oscillator were 
powered by a 9 volt transistor 
battery. This system worked 
fairly well. However, ihe 
mixer is noisy, and is not 
sensitive enough to compie* 



ment the Gunnplexer, 

I decided to use a better 
converter in my system. VHF 
Engineering makes a 30 MHz 
receiver strip, called the 
RF-50, This receiver has an 
FET preamp, and tan be 
tuned over a range of 30-50 
MHz* Remember to wind the 
coils for the 30 MHz optionl 
This rf module is then used 
with the VHF receiver, con- 
sisting of the IF iOJ, IF455, 
and AS*1 audio module. If 
you order these strips from 
VHF Engineering^ specify the 
"wideband" option. The 
wideband kit consists of 10.7 
MHz transformers that 
replace ihe 455 kHz units 
normally used. The wideband 
option converts the double- 
conversion receiver to a wide- 
band (100 kHz) single-conver- 
sion job, suitable for 
Gunnplexer use. 

It is best to wideband your 
modules immediately. I had 
to convert mine, which was a 
messy, ttme-consuming job. 
All the old 455 if trans- 
formers had to be removed 
from the PC board — ugh I 
Fig. 5 details the completed 
i-f receiver, mounted on 
standard VHF Engineering 



rails. 

Preamp Option 

An additional problem 
exists when using the VHF 
receiver. The input imped- 
ance of the RF-50 is 50 
Ohms J and the Gunnplexer 
diode impedance is 200 
Ohms. A simple balun could 
be used to effect a match, or 
the input coil on the receiver 
could be rewound. In the 
interest of performance, I 
chose another tack. I just 
happened to have a small, low 
noise OSCAR 10 meter 
preamp available. This 
preamp has a broadband 
toroid as an input circuit. It 
was a simple matter to rewind 
the toroid to produce a 200 
Ohm input impedance- This 
preamp is visible in Fig, 5* A 
preamp is not necessary. I 
used one because it was avail- 
able. I think the best method 
of matching the mixer in a 
simple system is to modify 
the input coil on the RF-50. 
The system will work if a 
200-50 Ohm mismatch is 
present — you won't even 
notice it in close range tests! 

Putting It All Together 

Since my system is experi- 
mental at this point, I did not 
mount all the components in 
a single enclosure, I coupled 
the mixer to the OSCAR 
preamp (Mode X?), and ran a 
piece of RG*58 from the 
preamp to the RF-50. A nine 
volt battery powers the 
preamp, while a 12 volt nicad 
is used for the VHF receiver. 
The Gunn oscillator requires 
regulated power at 10 volts* I 
derived this voltage by using a 
National LIVI317 three 
terminal regulator (Fig. 6). 
This regulator requires an 
input voltage at least 2 volts 
higher than the regulated 
output. I built a battery 
producing about 16 volts 
from old AA nicad cells. 
Remember that the Gunn 
diode draws considerable 
current, and carbon cells 
probably won't last during 
experiments. Fig. 2 is a block 
diagram of the system. The 
voltage divider is constructed 
from a 10k pot and two 10k 



2S 




Fig. ft The Gunn osci/htor voftage regufaton A National 
LM-317 yan'able regulator, set for JO voits, is used. The PC 
board and resistor are part of an evaluation device from 
National Semiconductor. The regulator is mounted on a leg of 
the tripod in my experimental system. 



resistors in series with a 9 volt 
battery. The varactor bias is 
developed at the slider. The 
negative side of both the 
Gunn supply and bias supply 
should be connected to the 
body of the Gunnplexer, I 
mounted the Gunnplexers to 
standard photo tripods by 
making a simple mount out 
of copper flashing. Drill two 
y** holes in a 2'* piece of 
flashing to line up with the 
bottom screws holding the 
Gunn baseplate to the Gunn- 
plexer body. Bend the flash- 
ing around the bottom of the 
Gunoplexer, and sweat-solder 
a Va*' nut to the flashing. The 
nut will mate with the bolt 
built into most tripods. 

Tuning Up 

My system consists of two 
Gunn transceivers. When 
initially checking your 
system, position the two 
transceivers about 50 feet 
apart, facing each other* 
Adjust the bias supply so that 
about 4,5 volts is present at 
the varactor diode on each 
transceiver. Apply Gunn 
voltage. If a 0-500 mA meter 
IS available, check current 



drain. The Gunn diodes 
should draw about 225 mA at 
10 volts. This is not standard; 
different diodes draw slightly 
different currents. Adjust the 
varactor voltage divider on 
one transceiver. Tune very 
carefully until the receiver 
quiets — there, youVe on 
10.25 GHz! This system is 
full duplex — you will hear 
yourself in your receiver 
when talking. Occasional 
tweaking of the bias will be 
required to keep the trans- 
ceivers locked . , . however, 
once they are temperature 
sta bi lizedp remarkable 
stability will be noted with a 
1 00 kHz if. 

At this point, you will 
probably begin experimenting 
with the transceivers. Try 
reflecting the signal around a 
90 degree corner with alumi- 
num foil, I won't even 
attempt to suggest experi- 
ments and applications — if 
you've followed me this far 
and built a system, you don't 
need my proddingl However, 
I will be continuing this series 
with practical experiments 
and applications involving 
radar. Don't keep us in the 




Fig. Z Not a Martian, but a Gunnplexer transceiver rf head^ 

The i-f amplifier and power supply is at the base of the tripod. 
Two transceivers should be separated by 25-50 feet for initial 
test Ultimate range Is 50 miles with this system. 



darkj however, I would appre- 
ciate hearing from anyone 
experimenting with Gunn- 
plexers and will welcome 
articles featuring the device. 
Write me, in care of 73. 

A Word of Caution 

If you have been following 
my editorial in 73, what 
follows will be repetitive. 
Microwaves are potentially 
dangerous. Do not needlessly 
expose yourself to the micro- 
waves generated by the Gunn- 
plexers. Although the level is 
very low, why take a chance? 
Opinion concerning micro- 
waves varies, but one fact is 
certain: Microwave radiation 
can damage the tissues of the 
eye. The effects are cumula- 
tive, so treat the Gunnplexer 
with the same respect 
afforded a high voltage plate 
supply. Never look into the 
horn of an operating micro- 
wave transmitter Avoid 
lcx>king at the mixer diode in 
a Gunnplexer while it Is oper- 
ating; if you see it youVe 
being exposed. I personally 
do not stand in front of a 
Gunnplexer at distances 
under 25 feet. When oper* 
ating indoors, I use a cheap 



police radar detector to 
monitor the Gunnplexer — 
it's too easy to leave the 
Gunn supply connected ... 
no noise is generated by a 
Gunn diode! Happy experi- 
menting! 

Interesting effects are 
liable to occur if you operate 
your Gunn transceiver mobile 
in a police radar zone. Their 
radar is broadband by nature, 
and will respond to your legal 
microwave transmission, 
exactly as my detector 
responds to "out of band*' 
signals from the Gunnplexer. 
Have a copy of your amateur 
ticket available — i would 
hate to learn that your trans- 
ceiver was impounded. New- 
fangled devices, what's the 
world coming to? 

I would like to thank Dana 
Atchley, Jr. of Microwave 
Associates and Bob Brown of 
VHF Engineering for their 
advice and suggestions. ■ 

Relerences 

GunnpJexers are as^itabte from: 

Microwa\/e Associates, Inc.^ 

Burlington MA 01803. 

VHF Engmeerirtg products from: 

VHF Engineering Corp., 320 

Water St., Binghamton NY 

13901, 



29 



Home Brew 



Tilt 'Over 



-- the water pipe special 



Max HoUand W4MEA 
Hiwassee Coliege 
Madison viUe TN 37 354 



A primary disadvantage 
of antenna work is the 
need to constantly climb up 
and down the tower. A tilt- 
over tower is very desirable; 
however, the expense is often 
prohibitive. If a person has 
access to a fairly heavy-duty 
welder and is interested in 
building his own tower j this 
design seems to be a fairly 
good compromise between 



height and convenience. The 
very tall lowers have such 
extreme weight when tilted 
over that they require some 
heavy-duty cable and con- 
struction. 

This tilt-over tower was 
constructed using galvanized 
svater pipe and reinforcing 
bars (called **rebars*') pur- 
chased at the local junk yard. 



The total cost^ not counting 
labor and the welding ex- 
penses, was approximately 
$100, The dimensions given 
in the accompanying diagram 
will be of g"eal help in getting 
started. 

Basically, the construction 
consists of determining the 
dimensions of the base 
section and making up two 
plywood forms with the holes 
drilled in the shape of a 
triangle. One and one quarter 
inch water pipe is put in the 
holes, and the rebars are cut 
and tack-welded in place. The 
final welding is done after the 
necessary alignment has been 
checked. 

The base section calls for 
one cubic yard of concrete. 
The hole was dug 3 feet by 3 
feet by 3 feet. Gravel was put 
in the bottom of the hole, 
and the legs of the lower 
section were put down into 
the gravel to allow for the 
drainage of any accumulated 
water. Wires were attached to 
the lep of the tower, and 
additional rebars were placed 
in the sides of the holes at 
this time. 

After the concrete has set, 
the top or tilt-over section of 
the tower is hoisted into posi- 
tion, using the cable and 
winch attached to the tower. 
After the top is placed in 
position^ a 5/8 inch diameter 
bar is required. Then the 
cable and the winch can be 
moved to the end of the 
tilt-over section of the tower, 
and the tower can be pulled 
up into a vertical position, A 



^ 





i| 



yoke, in which the tiltover 
section of the tower lies, is 
then made, secured by at 
least 6 stainless steel clamps 
(the kind used on automobiie 
water hoses). A more suitable 
method of attachment may 
be used; however, this meth- 
od provided good side clear- 
ance between the tilt-over 
section and the base section. 
After two years of use, it 
seems to be more than ade- 
quate for the weight involved* 

The total height of the 
tower is around 35 feet. The 
top section was made out of 
conduit tubing, for the addi- 
tional benefit of lig|it weight. 
Three quarter inch conduit 
fits over the one half inch 
galvanized pipe used for the 
tilt-over section. Once again, 
rebars were put into the 
tower section in triangular 
shapes for additional strength 
where the tower bends. Addi- 
tional rebars and reinforce* 
ment were used to keep the 
tower from collapsing at that 
point. 

A metal plate was attached 
inside the tower and a Q>R 
Model AR 22 rotator was 
mounted. A Model 44 or 
Ham-M rotator could be 
mounted in the space, but the 
holes for the mounting plate 
would have to be changed 
accordingly. The pipe upon 
which the antenna mounts is 
1-1/4 inch aluminum with the 
topmost part being 1-1/8 inch 
aluminum tubing. 

The tower was given a coat 
of aluminum paint, and seems 



IQP^ f CCTIM 



ii/a uk%T 



^CL«1IAP 




PtVOT 



SIDE MOUtST BF^ACKEt 



Fig. J. A = 3/8*' rebar, 8 = VA" galvanized pipe, C - !4" gafvanized pipe. D = M'* conduit tubing. 



to be holding up fairly well 
after 2 years. The aluminum 
paint will probably last 3 or 4 
years. The total time to paint 
the tower (considering all the 
small and minute parts) 
amounted to about 6 hours* 
Spray painting could be used 
if desired. 

The winch is sold by Sears, 
Roebuck and Co. The cable is 
rated at about 1500 pounds. 

As an additional safety 
precaution, when the antenna 
is in the vertical position, a 
heavy-duty chain and fock is 
wrapped around the legs of 
both sections. The triangular 
shape of the leg braces for the 



base of the tower discourages 
the climbing of the tower. 

The fcediine for the anten- 
na can travel along the le^ of 
the tower. There is enough 
clearance between the two 
sections to tape the coax 



cable directly to the tower. 
The bracket mounted on the 
side of the tower {see photo) 
is used to support a 10 foot 
long pole, which is used as a 
center support for an 80 
meter wire dipole. ■ 





31 



Jacob Z. Sdianker W2STM 
1 05 Colony Lane 
Rochester NY 1462J 



Minimize Feedline Loss 



-- UHF buffs, front and center! 



It has beerr poinled out on 
occasion J but not often 
nor emphatically enough, 
that the standing wave ratio 
(swr) as measured down in 
your cozy ham shack is not 
Ihe same as the actual swr up 
at your antenna. The swr at 
the antenna will always be 
higher than what you 
measure it to be at the trans- 
mitter end. The reason that 
the swr is lower at the trans- 
mitter end is because of losses 
in the transmission tine 
between transmitter and 
antenna. So, while it is 
undeniably nice to have a low 
swr at the transmitter, line 
losses are not exactly the 
most efficient way to go 
about it. 

How do line losses lower 
the swr at the transmitter end 
and fool you into thinking 
that your antenna is a better 
match than it really is? Glad 
you asked. Here's the answer. 
That little swr meter atop 
your transmitter measures the 



reflected power relative to 
the forward power. The swr is 
proportional to the ratio of 
reflected to forward power, 
or more precisely: 



1 + 



swr = 



reflected power 
>| forward power 



1' 



J 



reitected power 
forward power 



Unfortunately, the ratio of 

reflected to forward power 
which the swr meter sees 
down in the shack is not the 
same as that which the anten- 
na sees. Because of the losses 
in the line, the forward power 
at the antenna is less than 
that leaving the transmitter^ 
which is what the swr meter 
sees. What's more, the re- 
flected power which the swr 
meter measures is less than 
the reflected power at the 
antenna, again, by the 
amount of loss in the line. 
This is because the reflected 
power travels backwards 
through the same lossy line 







Type 


of Cible 






Band 


RG58A/U 


RG59B/U 


RG8A/U 


RG11AAJ 


80/7 5m 


0^ 


0.63 




02 


0.38 


40m 


i;3 


051 




0.44 


0.S4 


20m 


1-9 


13 




0.66 


0J7 


lim 


2.45 


1.65 




034 


OSS 


tOm 


2B 


IS5 




1,0 


IJ 


&n 


4A 


2.7 




1.4 


1.S 


2m 


7_6 


4J8 




2.7 


2.7 


1 y*m 


9.7 


6.1 




3.4 


3.4 


3/4m 


14.5 


9.0 




5,2 


4.9 



Table }. Attenuaiion in dB per hundred feet for common 
coaxia! cables. Source: Alpha Wire Corporation, Catalog W-8. 



from the antenna to the swr 
meter and transmitter. If you 
are algebraically inclined, you 
can see IhaL in the equation 
for swr, the reflected power 
in the numerator of the 
square root terms is made 
lower by the line loss, while 
the forward power in the 
denominator of these same 
terms is made higher Both 
effects cause the square root 
terms to be less, which results 
in the value of swr being 
lower. Thanks^ or no thanks, 
to line loss, the swr at the 
transmitter end is lower than 
the actual swr of the antenna. 

**So what," you say. Well, 
for those skeptics who may 
be sitting back reading this 
article after calling CO for 
fifteen minutes straight with 
no replies, let me present an 
example of just how signifi- 
cant an effect this can be. 

Consider a ham who 
operates on ten meters using 
150 feet of RG58/U coax to 
feed his antenna. One night 
his antenna blows down, 
leaving the feedline dangling 
in thin air on his roof. The 
next morning, unaware of the 
disaster which befell his 
antenna, he sits down for a 
few hours of operation* 
Tuning up, he checks his swr 
meter, ll reads about 2.1 :1 , a 
little worse, perhaps, than 
usual, but not too bad. It will 
do for now, or so he thinks. 
After an hour of fruitless 
CQing, he throws in the towel 
and goes out for a walk, 



tripping over his antenna on 
the front lawn. An extreme 
example, you think? Not at 

all. It has happened to me 
and ril bet to many others. 

The startling fact is that 
the swr at the antenna end of 
the feedline (where the anten- 
na used to be) is infinite; all 
the power is reflected because 
there's nowhere else for it to 
go but back. Yet the swr 
meter in the shack reads 
2.1:1- This clearly demon- 
strates the kind of difference 
line loss can cause between 
actual and apparent swr. 

And that's not all the bad 
fiews. Remember that power 
reflected from the antenna 
(let's assume again that there 
is an antenna) is reduced by 
the effect of line losses as it 
travels back from the antenna 
towards the transmitter* This 
is lost power, just the same as 
power is lost in going for- 
wards from the transmitter to 
the antenna. But this re- 
flected power loss is a func- 
tion of how much power is 
reflected in the first place. 
Or, put another way, the 
additional power loss (in the 
reflected wave) is a function 
of the antenna swr. The 
higher the antenna swr, and 
the higher the rated attenu- 
ation of the feedline, the 
more the additional loss will 
be. 

So now that you are a 
believer, you will want to 
know what your antenna swr 
really is, and how much addi* 
tional power toss that swr is 
causing in your line. Thanks 
to a friendly computer, the 
answer is easily found. Just 
look it up in Table 2. To use 
Table 2, all you need to know 
is the rated attenuation for 
the type and length of feed- 
line you are using, as well as 
the readingof your swr meter 
at the transmitter. The rated 
attenuation of feedlines is 
available in manufacturers' 
literature and in the various 
radio handbooks. Don't be 
surprised if you find the 
values from different sources 
differing by up to a dB or so. 
But so you don't have to go 
searching, I've summarized 
the rated attenuation per 



32 



hundred feet of line for some 
of the more popular coaxial 
cables in Table 1. 

An example will serve to 
illustrate the proper use of 
these tables. 

Let's say that you have 
one of the popular 100 Watt 
output SSB transceivers feed- 
ing a trap tri bander through 
about 150 feet of RG58A/U 
coax. You tuned the antenna 
for the CW end of the bands 
because that's where you 
spend most of your operating 
time. At your favorite fre- 
quency of 14.026 MHz, the 
swr meter sitting atop the rig 
reads about 1.2* On occasion, 
you QSY up the band to 
14.335 MHz to keep a week- 
end sked there and add to the 
QRM. Up here in the high 
end of the phone band, your 
swr meter reads about 2,0, 
Darn good, you thinL But 
let's see if it is. 

From Table 1, the loss 
per hundred feet of 
RG58A/Uis 1.9 dB in the 20 
meter band. Now, since your 
line is 150 feet long, its rated 
attenuation will be (150 
feet/100 fieet) x IS dB = 
2,85 dB, Going to Table 2, 
we find that line which has a 
third column entry ("Rated 
Line Loss in dB*') closest to 
2,85 dB (it will be 3.0 dB), 
and a first column entry 
('*Measured swr at Trans- 
mitter") closest to the 2.0 
your meter reads (it will be 
2:0), Findng this line, the 
actual swr at the antenna is 
given in the second column 
("Actual Antenna swr") and 
we note that it is 4.97, almost 
5 to 1 ! A lot higher than you 
thought, isn't it? The value in 
the fourth column ("Actual 
Overall Loss in dB") gives 
you just what it says, the real 
losses in your line in dB, 
including the effects of the 
actual swr and losses in re- 
flected power. 

This is 5,03 dB. Surprise! 
And now for the final 
shocker. The last or fifth 
column, labelled "Overall 
Efficiency of Line," reads 
31*4%. This just about says it 
all in a single figure, and 
possibly explains why you 
have such a tough time com- 



Measured 




Rated 


Actual 


Overall 


swr at 


Actual 


Lme Loss 


Overall 


Efficiency 


Tran^nifter 


Antenna swr 


indB 


Loss in dB 


of Line 


1.0 


1.0 


OS 


0.5 


89.1% 


1.5 


1.58 


03 


0.55 


SS.2% 


2.0 


2.19 


0.5 


0.64 


86.2% 


3.0 


3.56 


0.5 


0.89 


81.4% 


4.0 


5J2 


0.5 


1.18 


76,1% 


5.0 


6.94 


0,6 


1.51 


70.7% 


1,0 


1.0 


1.0 


1.0 


79.4% 


1.5 


1.67 


KO 


1.11 


77.5% 


2.0 


2.45 


1.0 


1,33 


73.6% 


3.0 


4 .40 


1.0 


1 .94 


63,9% 


4.0 


7.18 


1,0 


2.73 


55,4% 


5.0 


1 1 .45 


IJO 


3.74 


42,3% 


1.0 


1.0 


2.0 


2.0 


63.1% 


1.5 


1^3 


2,0 


2.28 


59.1% 


2.0 


3.24 


2J0 


2.91 


51.2% 


3.0 


8,64 


2Q 


5.05 


31.3% 


4.0 


39.83 


2.0 


10.26 


9.4% 


1.0 


1.0 


3.0 


3.0 


50.1% 


t.5 


2.33 


3.0 


3.58 


43.9% 


2.0 


4.97 


3.0 


5.03 


31.4% 


3.0 


890 .01 


3.0 


25.23 


0.3% 


1.0 


1.0 


4.0 


4.0 


35.5% 


1.5 


3.59 


4.0 


5.98 


25.2% 


2.0 


11.30 


4.0 


8.74 


13.4% 


1 .0 


1,0 


5X> 


5-0 


31.6% 


1.5 


4.44 


5,0 


7.04 


19.8% 


1.0 


1,0 


6i> 


6.0 


25.1% 


1.5 


S.82 


6X3 


10.19 


9.6% 



Table 2. Noie that for rated fine loss above 2 dBj the measured swr at the transnfitter end wilf 
never go very high, even with very large swr at the antenna 



pleting that sked. Of the 100 
Watts your transmitter is 
putting into the lines, only 
31.4 Watts is actually de- 
livered to the antenna for 
radiation* YouVe been work- 
ing QRP and you didn't even 
know it 

Now you should be pre- 
pared to check out the real 
facts of life in your own 
antenna system, I hope it 
won't turn out too badly for 
you, but I'll lay odds that it 
will be worse than you 
thought it was. Well, back to 
the drawing board. 

Just what can you do to 
improve things? A full answer 
is fer beyond the scope of 
this article. But a few ihings 
you can do would have to 
start with getting fow loss 
feedJine. Every tenth of a dB 
of loss hurts you two ways - 
forward power loss and re- 
flected power loss. No single 
factor Will improve your over- 
all efficiency as much as using 
the lowest loss feedline 
feasible- That's one reason 



why open-wire line some- 
times works so well. It is 
extremely low loss. After you 
have gotten your line tosses 
down as low as your finances 
will permit (lower loss, bigger 
bucks), than work on 
reducing the swr at the anten- 
na feedpoint, by tuning, 
matching, trimming, or what- 
ever is appropriate to your 
particular antenna. After 
that, there's always a match- 
box or antenna tuner as a 
new addition at the trans- 
mitter end. Now understand 
this very clearly: A matchbox 
at the transmitter end will 
not in any way reduce the 
kind of transmission line 
losses discussed in this article, 
except over that short por- 
tion of line connecting the 
matchbox to the transmitter, 
A matchbox will, however, 
provide a very low swr to the 
transmitter which will enable 
it to put out all the power it 
was designed lo, even though 
we know some will be lost in 
the line. Without a matchbox, 



it is quite possihlc that the 
transmitter will be unable to 
put out its full rated power in 
the first place. Incidentally, it 
is probably worth mentioning 
that the "Measured swr at 
Transmitter" in Table 2 and 
in the discussion implies that 
it is measured on the antenna 
side of any matchbox, if one 
is used. This should be 
obvious, but probably won't 
be to everyone. The swr at 
the transmitter side of a 
matchbox is normally 1,0 if 
the matchbox is tuned cor- 
rectly, but something quite 
higher at the antenna side. So 
if you already have a match- 
box and are going to make 
these measurements, be sure 
to move the swr meter to the 
antenna side, after first 
tuning the matchbox for 
minimum swr going into the 
transmitter. 

There is no one big secret 
to a stand-out signal, just a 
It it of small ones. Now some 
of Lhem aren't secret any 
more> ■ 



33 



m 



How About 




FM? 



- - It s easy 
with a modified HE -50 



A/Jan S. Joffe W5KBM 
1005 Twining Road 
Dresher PA 19Q2S 



WR3ABE is a fine, 
welt-managed six 
meter FM repeater in our 
area. I have had access to it 
on a mobile basis for some 
time, but never had gotten 
around to installing a base 
station at the QTH, The 
search for such a facility had 

Photos by WA3PTC 



been an off apin, on again 
type of romance until fate 
intervened. W3GHH an- 
nounced that his Lafayette 
HE-50, a little old-time ten 
meter transceiver, was avail- 
able if anyone had a use for 
it. Examination of the con- 
tents of the box and its 
schematic showed great 
promise for a good six meter 
conversion* The receiver is 
single conversion with an rf 
amplifier, two stages of 1650 
kHz i-f, a good noise timiter^ 
plus capability of operating 



on either the 110 volt line or 
on 1 2 volts dc. 

The transmitter consisted 
of two tubes, a 6EA8, and a 
2E26 in the final The triode 
section of the 6EA8 worked 
as an oscillator/doubler. The 
pentode section of the 6EA8 
worked as a second doubler, 
and the 2E26 worked straight 
through on ten meters. 

The transmitter conversion 
consisted of getting six meter 
output on the repeater fre- 
quency using 8 MHz crystals. 
Then the AM modulation had 



to be removed from the final 
and an FM modulator in- 
stalled. The first doubler coil 
was pruned so the stage 
would now be a triplen Thus 
its output was in the 24 MHz 
area. The pentode doubler 
was left a doubler, but its 
tank circuit was altered so it 
would tune to six meters. The 
same operation was per- 
formed on the final tank coiL 
Thanks to a grid dip meter, 
this operation took about 3/4 
of an hour, and the trans- 
mitter >ras putting about five 
Watts out on six meters. The 
normai dc input to the final is 
about 1 2 Walts* The rf con- 
version included clipping and 
discarding a built-in TV I 
harmonic trap which had 
been connected from output 
of the pi network to ground. 
With some five Watts of rf 
available, it was time to 
attend to the change in 
modulation* 

Fig. 1 shows the Una] form 
of the FM modulator. The 
AM modulation was divorced 
from the final by the simple 
expedient of changing the B+ 
feed to the final so that it got 
no audio. The 5k 5 W resistor 
was added as a load across the 
modulator output to replace 
the class C rf load that had 




34 




been removed A small audio 
transformer with a 20,000 
Ohm primary and a 600 Ohm 
secondary was fed from the 

old modulator through a 0.01 
uF capacitor to isolate the B+ 
from the primary. The 
varicap network was wired 
across the 600 Ohm secon- 
dary and coupled across the 
crystal. A 45 pF trimmer was 
put in series with the crystal 
to put me on the nose with 
the repeater input frequencv. 
There are those who wilt 
shudder at the lack of frilSs in 
the modulator, e,g-, no dc 
bias on the varicap, etc*, but 
the proof of the audio is in 
the hearing and reports have 
been uniformly favorable. 



.l/t 6CAa 



With the transmitter so 
nicely under control, atten- 
tion was paid to the receiver. 
The lineup consisted of an rf 
stage, a converter, two i-f 
stages^ and the usual func- 
tions after this point. The 
initial thought was to convert 
from six to ten meters using 
an external converter. Then, 
second thoughts came to bear 
as the front end was 
examined more closely. Fig. 2 
shows the first several stages 
of the receiver. The thought 
that came through was to 
examine the possibility of 
making the rf amplifier a con- 
verter, add a crystal -con- 
trolled local oscillator for 
injection, and leave the rest 



1/2 «CAe 

OS a LL4T0n/ T H IP LEB 




VARICAP 



OSCILLATOR 



^m 



of ihe receiver untouched. 

A six meter tuned circuit 
was put in the grid circuit and 
dipped to frequency* The 
bench signal generator was 
used as an injection oscillator^ 
with very satisfying results. 
An order went out for a 
23*64 MHz crystal, which 
produced the hardest part of 
any building or conversion 
.•• waiting for the mail! 
Naturally, being human and 
subject to impatience, I put 
the thing on the air for an 
initial contact through the 
repeater. With the assistance 
of WA3RMA, I overcame 
such obstacles as a varicap 
that decided to head west, an 
intermittent mike cable, and 
other standard assorted griefs. 



HF-AHP 



lOfff 



^h 



ATQK 



If the signal generator that I 

was using as the converter 
injection oscillator could have 
been condensed, I might have 
been tempted to call it a day 
and button up the case. As 
usual, though, reason did pre- 
vail and the wait for the 
crystal began. 

The received audio from 
the repeater is so good by 
merely using slope detection 
that all thoughts of installing 
a conventional FM detector 
vanished* This may, in part, 
be due to the excellent rf 
signal that the repeater puts 
into my QTH, In any event, 
armchair copy exists here 
without any detector 
changes. 

As the crystal-controlled 




i/zm.M« 



BiMO PASS 
XFMfi 



lO'TSpF 

TUNINO J^ -^ 

2B.5-30 T ^ 

WKi 



I5pF 




flj. /, 



Fig, 2. 



35 



TO i^DDED 

*NT€NNJl 



G4{3^ 







lOOlt 
I ^ftft 



I 






t£K 



JO 01 




12 BA« 



/ff 



2N22I9 



TO WCVfl 
mPUT 



JUL 



w 



ToJ VhJ ^ 



joi 



/77 
VJiCKiR OSCILLATOR 



O-TSpF 
^rf PtSTCm TRlMMEJI 



I — • »Td XMTR PI NET 




OtiSTiNG 
RELAY 



ZOO^F 

-IC2 ADOED RCLAy 

RAtHO SHACK 27S-206 



F/ J. j. 



injection oscillator was going 
to be solid state, a source oiF 
low voltage was needed. The 
cathode bias resistor of the 
6A05 proved to be a handy 
source of plus 10 volts, 
solving this problem. 

Nothing could spoil this 
fine forward progress except 
the mailman, or more pre- 
cisely, the mail person, as he 
is really a she. The postcard 
was from the Great American 
Pool Table and Quartz 
Crystal Company- It said: 
'*Dear Cur: Your crystal will 
be along in about eight 
weeks.'* 

Not only were they 
making me wait two months 
for the crystal I wanted 
yesterday, but they also had 



included a finely drawn char- 
acter analysis in the message- 
Fortunately, I had heard 
of Mr, Vackar and his drift- 
less, easy-toroli VFO. This 
little item (Fig. 3) worked 
extremely well, and was in- 
stalled in a minibox on the 
rear of the transceiver. The 
design information was 
abstracted from a fine article 
in the February, 1968, issue 
of Electronic Engineer ^ 
written by Gary Blake 
Jordan. A rough check of 
stability showed a drift of 
about TOO Hz over a period 
of about three hours after 
turn-on. There is plenty of 
room inside the transceiver 
for this unit, but there is a 
hostile tube-induced heat 



COAX 
OLFT^UT 




r^ 



^cT >'* 






;: 



ATOtC 



m 





RFC 



Fig. 4, 



problem that I wished to 
avoid — hence the external 

mounting site. 

The only other item of 
business was to install an 
antenna transfer relay. You 
might well ask, if it is already 
a transceiver, why do you 
have to install one of these? 
The answer is simple. The 
original design had the trans- 
mitter output and the re* 
ceiver input tied together as 
shown in Fig, 4. It worked 
fine on 10 meters, but I could 
not get it to behave on 6 
meters — hence the added 
relay. 

Afterthoughts 

The nice part about a 
globe like the 12BA6jn con- 
trast to a transistor, is that it 
has three possible ports of 
entry for the iniection oscil- 
lator. I tried all three, 
cathode, control grid and 
suppressor grid. The control 
grid injection seemed to give 
the greatest gain, and thus 
was used in the finished con- 
version. 

The original press-to-talk 
relay is actually an ac relay 
which has a resistor thrown in 
series with it when the unit is 



used on 12 volts dc for 
portable use. This explains 
why the diode and the fitter 
cap appear along with the 
added relay as shown in Fig, 
3. 

The FM modulator de- 
serves a special note. Perhaps 
due to personal preference 
and how the gods smile at the 
time, I have always had good 
luck with the varicap modu- 
lator when it gets its audio 
from a relatively low imped- 
ance winding of a transfor- 
mer. For some delightful 
reason, the diode does not 
seem to care which end is up, 
and there is no polarity prob- 
lem. It also seems to be per- 
fectly happy without any 
obvious dc bias, so why fight 

fortune? 

The vertical antenna 

shown mounted on the rear 
of the unit is OK for short 
hauls, but there is nothing 
that can take the place of a 
good skyhook as high up as 
reason wil! allow. 

There are many similar 
units that have fallen into 
disuse as the times change^ 
just waiting to be rescued and 
put to good use. Try it — 
you'll like it. ■ 



Ham Help 



I would appreciate your technical 
help on an antenna problem ^ Because 
I live in an apartment, I decided to go 
with a mobile antenna and operate 
from my car. I bought a Hustler 
mobile antenna and a 40 meter reso- 
nator . Much to my surprise, it worked 
quite well. Later, of course. 1 wanted 
to at least listen to the radio inside my 
apartment. I bought an extra mobile 
mount and assembled the antenna, 
adding a single wire to the mount — 
the length of the car. The reception 
wm still \/ery good. Nousr the problem. 
I tun^d up ihe irarisceTver (a Kenwood 



TS'520) and found a 1 to 1,3 swf. Can 
I go ahead and transmit and not cause 
harm to my transceiver? I would 
rather not go to the expense of b 
transmatch unless really necessary. If 
thl$ antenna system will work, where 
did i go right? 

William Day WB0VTB 

3420 Lakeside Manor Apts, 

Iowa City lA 52240 

I am interested in a simple tube 
converter circuit to observe received 
signals on my generai purpose scope^ 
whicli has a horizontal sweep range of 



250 kHz and a transceiver H of 3180 
kHz. Transceiver ts a Ysmu 101 -B. 
General purpose scope ts Dumont 
lypeSCM-AH. 

Bill Mas$ey WBeSSO 

1505 Lymon Avenue 

Wilmington CA 90744 

I have been trying to locate a 
source that has Gunn diodes for the 
10 GHz range to use in an Dsciilator 
for microwawe bench experiments^ as 
in 73 1 March, 1974^ page 33. I have an 
osciflator cavity, once part of an 
intruder alarm, but the Gunn diode is 
gone. It seems similar to what Micro- 
vuave Associates calls style 30 ease. I 
have had no luck calling companies 
for a possible replacement, Might any 
of yoyr readers be able to supply an 



CKOtic device such as this at a reason- 
able price for 1-2 units? Thank you, 

ftitftk Geigef 

111 Hervdrickfon Ave. 

N. MmicklMY 11566 



Having recently upgraded my 
license, I have begun thinking about 
other forms of ham radio. I would like 
to put a 2 meter antenna on my 
Cessna Sky hawk, but so far I have not 
been able to find one which will pass 
FAA requirements and not cost 
several hundned dollars. Any help in 
solving th[s pfobteffl would be appre- 
ciated. 

Richard n. Sntar WD8BTW 

173 Faifview Drive 

Matyiville OH 43040 



36 



m Booming 25 watts output power 
@ 14v DC input 

• Separate controls for independent trans- 
mit and receive frequency selection 

• Switch for tock-fn of pre-selected fre* 
quency pairs allows one-knob operation 

• Supersensitive dual-gate MOS PET in 
receiver head end 

• Backlighted for night operation 

• Factory-installed, front panel mount 12 
digits alpha-numeric tone encoder 




GTX-200T 

(incf, 146.94 MHz) 

95 



$ 



249 




Features Like These Make Genave 
Tlie FM Transceiver For You! 



The GTX-200T is only one of the superfor 2-meter 
transceivers in Genave's complete line of American- 
made amateur radios. 

All Genave gear is carefully handcrafted under the 
strictest quality control conditions in a facility in- 
spected and approved by an agency of the federal 
government for the production of precision aircraft 
navigation and communication equipment 

And, all Genave amateur FM transceivers are an 

unprecedented value because you order factory 
direct eliminating middlemen profits! 



Each Genave unit has 10J MHz first fF and 455 
KHz second IF filters for high selectivity, with RF out- 
put stages VSWR protected. In addition, Genave 
units are unusually lightv\/eight, v^ith fully transis- 
torized Integrated circuitry. 

Standard features include netting trimmers for each 
transmit crystal and single circuit board designs 
which permit easy modifications* 

So, take a good look at the GTX-200T and other 

Genave amateur gear. Then fill out the coupon be- 
low — better yet, calt collect: 317 + 546-7959, today! 



r 

I 

\ 

I GTX-2 

' 2 meter FM, 10 cliannels, 25 

I watts will) puslibuttanfregueft- 
cy selector (inci 146.34 MHi) 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

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I 

I 



I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
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I 
I 





D »189'5 



GTX-200 

2 meter FM, IQQ channel 
CQmbinationSp 25 watts (I net. 
WM mi) 



^iH!?5! 



GTX.200T 

2 meter FM, 100 channel 
CDmbinations, fa^tDry- instated 
front panel mount IZ cfigit al- 
pha-nun^errc tone encc^der. 

□ $24gw 




GTX-10S 

2 met^r FM» 10 channels, 
10 watts EJCtais not in- 
cluded) 

D »149« 



GTX-1 

□ $24995 

GTX-1T 

D »299»* 

KMHHietd, 2 meter FM, 6 channel, 
3,0 WiUi, GTX-IT With factory in- 
stall td tone encoQU. 





4141 Kiit|man Drive 
liidianaj^aljs, IN 4fi2]6 
Phone in orders accepted 
317/546-1111 



^ame 



Address 



City 



State & Zip 



Amateur Call 



I 
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I 



Payment by: 

rj Certified Check/ Money Order Q PersonaJ Check 

Q C.O.D. trtclude 20% down 

Note; Orders accompanred by personal checks will require about 

two weeks to pr&cess. 

20% down payment enclosed. Charge balance to: 



O BankAmericard #, 
a Master Charge #. 
Q Interbank # 



Expfres^ 



Expires. 



Expires. 



UN residents add 4% sates tax: $ 

All orders shipped post-paid within continental U*S. 



Add $4 per radio for Shlpfsinf, Handling & Crystal Nettinc 

ACCESSORIES 

n Riwgo Raflger ARX-2 6 db Z-M Base Antenna W9,M 

□ Lain!ida/4 tM and tM Trunk Antenna ... .,$29.95 

□ TE-1 Tone Encoder Pad , ^^_$59J5 

□ TE-1 1 Tone Encoder Pad „,...,.._„_ . $29.93 

□ PS'l Regylated AC Power Supply for use with al! 

makes of transceivers 14 VDC7 amp ,..469J5 

and the following sUndarii cnrstals 

@ $4.50 each ._ ^- .., S 

Kon^stanifar^ cryrtA 

ACCESSORrES FOR GTX-1 and GTX-1T 

n PSI-1B Optional Nicad battery pack $29,K 

n PS-2 Charger for GTX-!(T) battery pack 539.95 

n GLC-1 Leather carrying case ...„.,.....^ $12.55 

□ TE-lli Tone Encoder [for us« with GTX-1) $49.35 



75-10 



I 
I 
I 

r 



i 



.^ J 



WA.S. 



Easily! 



[ 



-- catching the last few 



Dave Waterman W7FGD 
I81QE. Terrace Way 
Kelso WA 98626 



Regardless of whether 
you have had your 
ticket for quite a while now 
or you are just getting on the 
air for the first time, I would 
like to present you with a 
challenge. The purpose of this 
article is to give you some 
hints and techniques to 
enable you to work a ham in 
every state of the United 
States and to get a QSL card 
back from hi m* 

The ARRL has awarded 
over 25,000 Worked All 
States certificates to hams all 
over the world, and you can 
get one, too! It requires a 
little patience, a lot of 
listening on the bands, and a 
bit of work. Oh> come on 
now! You're not afraid of a 

little work! 

A WAS award Is a lovely 
certificate to frame and hang 



on the wall of your shack, a 
fine conversation piece to 
show friends and family^ and 
working for it will sharpen 
your operating skills. The 
ARRL offers one as do 
several other orginizations 
and mag^-zines. 

But how do f work all 50 
states? How can it possibly be 
done on the crowded Novice 
bands? How do I get that 
elusive Delaware contact? Or 
Wyoming? Or South Dakota? 

Hopefully, we will answer 
these questions for you and 
get you started down the 
road to a WAS award. 

Starting Off 

First you must get 
yourself organized for the 
task. Take a sheet of lined 
paper and list all 50 of the 
states on it in two vertical 
columns, one down the left 
margin, and one down the 
center. Most lined paper has 
25 tines on It, so you can get 
half the states in each 



column. This is to be a 
check-off sheet for you to 
mark your progress. Each 
time you get a QSL from a 
new stale, put a check beside 
that state on your list. As 
time goes by» this list may 
become dog-eared, so I would 
suggest a clear plastic cover 
for it to protect it. Keep this 
list at your operating desk 
where it can be seen at a 
glance. This list serves several 
purposes. It not only shows 
the states youVe worked, but 
shows you the states you still 
need. If you hear a station 
give his QTH, a quick look at 
the list will tell you if you 
need him. Don't rely on your 
memory - use the list. 
Another thing this list does is 
help keep you on your toes 
and very aware of the states 
that you need- 
Antennas 

OK! You've got your 
check-off list prepared Now 
what? In your studies to get 



an annateur license and in 
almost all literature that 
you've come across 
concerning operating, you've 
been told time and time again 
that your antenna is the most 
important part of your 
station. I'm sorry to do this 
to you, but weVe going to 
talk about this subject again 
for the million and first time, 
because it is so very^ very 
important. You absolutely 
must get the best antenna 
you can for the bands which 
you choose to operate. If you 
have an oversized lot, lots of 
trees for wire arrays, 
neighbors who will let a few 
wires spill over onto their 
property, pat yourself on the 
back and light up a cigar; 
you're a lucky fellow. (I fall 
into this select category and 
realize how very fortunate I 
am,) Most hams are not so 
fortunate, and weVe going to 
assume that you're one of 
them. 

For the purpose of this 
article, we will assume that 
you run 100 Watts and use a 
dipole or an inverted vee 
antenna, which is capable of 
operation on 80, 40, and 15 
meters. Ten meters is so 
sporadic these days we will 
disregard it. I may be doing a 
disservice to this band, but 
you can't rely on it right 
now. 

Now our next step is to 
trot outside and take a close 

look at that antenna of yours. 
Is there any possible way to 
put up a full wave loop or 
Delta loop for 40 or 80? If 
so, do so[ If not, can you 
raise that dipole any higher? 
How about adding a sloping 
dipole off one or both ends 
of its supports? Slopers are 
very effective antennas, and 
also hear very well. Info on 
these antennas can be found 
in the many antenna books 
available either by mail or 
from your local ham store, 
(You do have a local ham 
store?) 

You say you can't do a 

thing different, huh! OK, 
make sure your antenna is 
radiating in the direction of a 
maximum number of states* 



38 



A north-south radiating 
antenna in Southern Cali- 
fornia isn't going to do too 
well in the Eastern seaboard. 
Of course, power lines and 
TV antennas slue radiation 
some, but check to see which 
way your signal is going. If 
you have any questions about 
this, refer to the antenna 
books. What you want is as 
low an angle of radiation as 
you can get, in the desired 
direction. 

Now, how about the coax 
{or whatever feediirw)? Check 
your connection to the 
antenna. Is it corroded? just 
one hard rain can seriousfy 
lower signal levels if you 
haven't weather proofed your 
feedline connection to your 
antenna. A W2AU balun*, or 
one similar, is ideal for this 
weatherproofing and elimi- 
nating feedline radiation with 
coax. Assuming your antenna 
is satisfactory, now look at 
your ground system. Ground 
system, not a ground wire! 
You need a ground wire going 
out of your shack to a buried 
cold water pipe (if at all 
possible}. In addition to this, 
you need a separate counter- 
poise for each band you 
operate on. Check the 
antenna books again for info 
on these. TheyVe simply 
lengths of wire cut to various 
lengths for each band — 
simple to install and effective 
in boosting your transmitted 
signal. 

Having maximized antenna 
and ground systems, we now 
turn to take a look at your 
shack. Do you use an antenna 
tuner and swr meter in your 
feedline? You say you don't! 
Oh, come on, I'm trying to 
help you, not start a fight, 
but really now! 

An antenna tuner and swr 
meter are essential for 
minimizing losses^ especially 
if you're trying to utilize that 
dipole of yours on 1 5 meters. 
There are many plans for 
building tuners in past ham 
magazines (73 has had 
several). You can build one 
for next to nothing, with a 
large coil and a wide spaced 



tuning capacitor from an old 
AM radio. Please get a tuner 
if you don't have one already. 
Some day you'll thank me. 

If you operate a trans- 
ceiver with VOX, you need 
not worry about a transm it- 
receive switch. If you run 
separate receiver and trans- 
mitter, you will. (Don't try 
and hide that knife switch 
you use. I can see the guilty 
look on your face.) If you 
have been using a separate 
switch to go from transmit to 
receive, carefully disconnect 
itj hold it firmly in your right 
hand, and throw it as far as 
you can. Now build, buy, 
beg, trade, or steal some sort 
of a T-R switch to use. It's 
hard enough to get that 
elusive Rhode Island contact 
when his signal is 339, the 
QRM is 599, and the QRN is 
40 over. You don't need to 
be flipping switches white 
that is going on. It will be 
plenty hard enough as it is. 
This is the electronic age and 
youVe a member of the 
brotherhood of ham radio 
operators. Use your electrical 
knowledge and get rid of that 
old knife switch. 

As for the swr meter, 
theyVe available at every CB 
store, ham emporium^ and 
from every gypsy on the 
street in every city of the US 
(and by mail order). 

We have upgraded all the 
hardware now* except for one 



item. There is still one link in 
your communications system 
we need to look at. That's 

you ! 

As long as there are 
different people in the world, 
there are going to be different 
operating techniques. What 
this is really boiling down to 
is the psychology of what 
makes you — you. But before 
we get into this very deeply, 
let's look at the different 
ways there are to work all 
states. You mean there's 
more than one? Yes! Actually 
there are three ways, all 
separate and distinct, in 
which a ham can achieve 
WAS. The first is to be a 
contestor. That is, operate in 
the large number of contests 
that occur each year. 
Successful contestors usually 
have years of experience and 
large numbers of them work 
all states every contest they 
enter. They have a high 
degree of competitiveness and 
a great pride in their gear, 
antennas, and especially their 
skill. They are after contacts 
and multipliers; they want all 
the stations they can work, 
the more, the better. They 
seldom rag chew. They are 
above our level of operation 
and theyVe not reading this 
article anyway, so weTI forget 
them^ 

The second way to work 
all stales is to get on the air 
for an hour a night, every 



now and then, and possibly 
two or three on the 
weekends. Chat for hours at a 
time, long and lengthy, about 
the height of the tides and 
the phase of the moon with 
every station that answers 
your CQ* Sooner or later, this 
operator wilt obtain a WAS 
certificate by chance. It is 
entirely possible, however, 
that the Sphinx will have 
turned to dust, the Rockies 
wilt be a desert, and everyone 
will have moved to 
Andromeda by then. 

The third way, and the 
one that you need to take, is 
to sit down with some sort of 
an organized plan, listen to 
the stations that are on the 
air, find the ones you 
need, and slowly check off the 
blank spaces on your check- 
off list as you move closer 
and closer to your goal Here 
is where the psychology angle 
comes in. You need to ask 
yourself^ what kind of person 
am I? Do 1 like to talk? Do I 
talk, maybe too much? If so, 
it could be that while you Ye 
chatting away for 45 minutes 
to Ralph in the next county, 
that Maine station 3 kHz 
down from you that you 
didn't even know was on the 
band, has worked twenty 
stations and went QRT for 
the nighu Now please don*t 
get me wrong. I'm not against 
rag chewing. As a matter of 
fact, Tm very much for it. I 




1810 E. TERRACE WAY 

KELSO, WASHINGTON 

98626 - U.S.A. 

COWLITZ COUNTY 

THIS CERTIFIES THAT , IS AN 

OPERATOR OF UNPARALLELED SKILL AND PATIENCE. IN SPITE 
OF THE QRM AND ORN, HERE AT THIS STATION FROM 
FOUR LITTLE GIRLS, ONE WIFE, AND AN INCESSANTLY RINGING 
LANDLINE, HE HAS MIRACULOUSLY BEEN ABLE TO CONTACT 

AND MAINTAIN A QSO OF 19. 

AT 



FREQ 



RIG 



ANT 



. THIS STELLAR ACCOMPUSHMENT CAN ONLY 

BE LAUDED WITH THE HIGHEST OF PRAISE, THE BEST OF 
73'S AND A FOND WISH FOR GREAT DX. 



MARAC - R653 
I3SB - 9393 



Pmd Waterman 



m 



dislike formalized QSOs and 
have made many, many great 
QSQs with interesting people. 
But a serious fisherman, when 
he goes fishing, is after fish. If 
the fish aren't biting and are 
not to be found, then they sit 
back and watch the sun set. 
You can very easily spend far 
too much time in a QSO 
during prime band hours if 
you like to chat. You need to 
look at yourself and the way 
you operate and ask yourself 
what you get out of ham 
radio* Are you operating 
correctly? Are you achieving 
what you want? If you love 
to chat and enjoy people, 
that's great. If you find it 
hard to open up to strangers, 
shorter QSOs will be your 
norm and you will tog more 
stations in a given time than 
one who is more long-winded. 
Maybe youVe not going after 
stations with enough 
aggression. If youVe really 
serious aboui this WAS 
award, go after it with gusto. 
Keep your QSOs short and be 
alert for the next fellow 
down the line, at least during 
prime band hours. 

Enough Talk - Let's Get At 
It 

OK, we're starting off- 
Let's quickly look at our 
bands. 15 meters is usually a 
daytime band, with some 
seasonal variations to 
different parts of the 
country. Check it ouu It can 
be your most valuable band 
when it's open. Your dipole 
and 100 Watts won't make 
you a powerhouse, but many 
stations that you work will be 
using beams and that will 
help. 15 meters is a fun band 
and you have a little elbow 
room to move in, Favor it as 
much as possible. It can get 
those states on the opposite 
seaboard that you need. It 
can also get most everything 
in between- 

40 meters begins to come 
in strong during late after- 
noon (out here in Washing- 
ton, anyway!) and will drop 
out in middle evening, 40 aiso 
has seasonal variations- 
Winter is best. Summer brings 
Static, but hang in there if 



you can* There is still a lot of 

action if your eardrums can 
take It, 40 will get you the 
midwest and the south easily. 

80 meters is best in early 
to late evening. Summer 
brings much static, too. Keep 
in mind that wc are being 
very general about all this and 
that suns pots and cold fronts 
and other factors can change 
things greatly. 80 will get you 
the adjacent states and 
midwest and south, too* 

In your early quest for 
WAS, a lot of CQing can be 
beneficial. You need to work 
most every state. The states 
wHI come quickly and it will 
be great fun to waich the 
cards come in and check off 
the states on your list. But, as 
time goes by, and your 
check-off sheet gains marks, 
new states will get harder and 
harder to come by. Here is 
where the real work will 
begin. (Remember, I never 
said it would be easy!) 

Now you're going to have 
to change your operating 
habits a bit You're going to 
have to listen more and be 
more selective in the stations 
you work. After your 
twenty -fifth 6-land QSL, 
you really won't have to 
work very many more for a 
while now, will you? In this 
respect^ the guys in California 
have it rough, but there's 
nothing to be done about it 
Just g-it your teeth, Calh 
fornia^ and carry on. 

Call areas will begin to 
slowly fill in. When you work 
all the zero4and states, forget 
ihem and move on to the 
others, 

In order to get those 
remaining states^ youVc guing 
to have to listen. Also, I 
would recommend a couple 
of techniques that have 
helped me. Buy a brand new 
Callbook. (Gulp — I know 
what they cost, but you're 
going to need it.) Practice 
using that book on calls that 
you hear on the air. Practice 
to the point that you can find 
a given call in about ten 
seconds, (Easy, huh? Just try 
it!) Now you have a valuable 
took In your tuning across 



the bandt any sution that 
you think you may need can 
be quickly looked up to find 
where he is, and not only 
him, but the guy he's talking 
to, I can hear you com- 
plaining about this from here* 
But took, you have doubled 
your chances to find those 
missing states you need. You 
need not now wait for him to 
give his QTH — look him up 
quickly. As you progress 
toward your goal, you will 
come to appreciate this tech- 
nique. 

Moving Right Along 

OK, We have progressed 
along. You're spending more 
and more time now listening 
to the bands. YouVe learning 
how to fight the QRM and 
pick out the weak si glials. 
You are looking for weak 
Signals, aren't you? You don't 
expect that KH6 to come in 
599 in New York, do you? 
He's probably going to be a 
339, if that. YouVe going to 
have to listen for the weak 
ones and be very alert Here 
you're going to suffer from 
the QRM problems on the 
Novice bands. There's a lot of 
you guys out there and 
youVe all trying to work each 
other. It's only natural that 
the first time you hear that 
KL7 you need so badly, half 
the world is going to want 
him, too. 

Audio filters^ crystal 
fUtcrs, or just anything that 
wilt increase your selectivity 
is going to be a real asset to 
you. 

If you find that the station 
you need is being called by a 
zillion other guys, there are 
two things you can do {three^ 
if you consider quitting, but 
Tm assuming youVe got 
gusto!). The first is to join 
the pack and have at him. For 
this you will need patience 
and perseverance. Be of stout 
heart and don't give up if you 
need him, even after the 
tenth time you called him 
and he went back to someof>e 
else. Or the twentieth. If he 
just won't come back to you, 
try tuning off his frequency 
just a little. Maybe there are 
so many people calling him 



that he can't make your 
signal out. Timing is impor- 
tant here. You 11 just have to 
face a few of these and you II 
learn fast But there is 
another course of action left 
to you in a piteup. Be cagey! 
If the band is open to KL7- 
land and everyone is after one 
guy, maybe there *s another 
KL7 down band a ways. Or 
maybe something just as 
juicy. If you hear a big 
pileup, check down band. 
When ail the cats are out 
chasing a rat, the mice are left 
to play. 

With everyone else after 
tl^ same station, QRM drops 
down band and weak signals 
come through. In actual prac- 
tice, on our crowded Novice 
bands, this situation would 
probably never happen, 1 
canV really imagine every 
station in the band all on one 
frequency after one station. 
On twenty meters, yes, that 
happens; on the Novice 
bands^ probably not. But I 
wanted to get the point 
across to you- YouVe going 
to have to be alert and think. 

Now, let's say weVe pro- 
gressed further. Time has 
gone by and by spending 
more and more time on the 
air, and patiently listening, 
looking up calls in your book, 
and working the ones that 
you needed, youVe got down 
to the point where you need 
just a handful. Let's say you 
need six more. You've spent 
weeks and weeks, now turn- 
ing into months and months, 
and you haven't heard any 
station in those states. You 
spend your evenings on 40 
and 80, Your Saturdays and 
Sundays are spent on 1 5, You 
spend so much time on your 
radio that the forest service is 
proclaiming your lawn a 
national park. Your dog bites 
you when you come home 
from work- Your two year 
old daughter cries when she 
looks at you out of fear of a 
stranger. All this and still 
nothing. OK. here are some 
thin^ you can do. 

First, watch for the state 
QSO parties in the states that 
you need. Most states have 
QSO parties once a year. 



40 



Some combine several states 
into one party^ but it's all the 
same thing. At these times, 
operators in these states are 
more active than usual and 
are looking for contacts. 
Another thing you can do is 
spread the word to your 
friends that you are desperate 
for these states and if they 
hear them on the air to give 
you a call. Four, six, or eight 
sets of ears are better than 
one. Here's another idea — 
get copies of QST and look 
up the listings each state SCM 
sends in each month. Find 
out what's going on in those 
states you need. Sometimes 
you can get a valuable clue as 
to when and where a club or 
special events station will be 
on the air. Also try your hand 
in operating in a contest. The 
best one for you is the Novice 
Roundup. Your chances of 
having an operator on In a 
needed state are improved. 
However, the increased QRM 
caused by the contest makes 
it harder to get through. Still, 
it*s something to try- 
Suppose none of this 
works. You're going around 
muttering. ''What the helTs 
happened to Delaware any- 
way. Why don't they send a 
DXpedition there?" Your job 
is suffering. Your wife is 
threatening divorce. And still 
nothing. 

Get on your ham friends 
again. Keep on them. Check 
with any DXers in the area, 
any you might faintly know, 
any you may have heard of. 
DXerSj county hunters, and 



regional net men have friends 
all over the country. Maybe 
gne of them can fix up a 
schedule and give you a hand 
with the contact. 

If all is for nought, and 
you still need some states, 
here*s what you do. First put 
an ad in the ham magazines 
requesting a sked with the 
states you need. If that's 
fruitless, as a last resort, look 
up in the ham magazines, 
contest winners in the states 
you need. If a man is a 
contest winner, he probably 
has a better than average rig 
and antenna setup, and prob- 
ably is more skilled than 
most. Sit down and write him 
a letter explaining your plight 
and beg him for a schedule at 
his convenience. That should 
work if nothing else will. I 
would do it for you, and I 
think most other hams would 
also. This should be con- 
sidered as a last^ last^ last 
resort only. It is an imposi- 
tion on people's time and 
themselves, and should not be 
requested lightly. 

With the techniques t*ve 
outlined, plus a lot of time on 
the air^ you should be able to 
contact a ham in ail 50 states. 
But we're not done yet. 
Contacting them and getting 
a QSL are two different 
matters, 

A QSL card should be a 
representation of yourself. 
It's all the other guy will have 
to remember you by- It 
should be different from the 
run-of-the-milt cards, and, if 
at all possible, unique. I 
would recommend to you 



that you have some special 
cards printed up. I have 
included one of my own 
cards to show you what I 
mean. It's not that my card is 
so great, but it is different, 
and reflects my own per- 
sonality. I am constantly 
getting comments about it — 
just get something different 
that reflects you. Don't you 
dare copy mine; just get 
something out of the 
ordinary that people will 
remember, a photo card if 
you want. 

Now, when you have that 
special card of yours, you're 
going to have to do one more 
thing. Do you know what an 
SASE is? It stands for self- 
addressed stamped envelope. 
Use them. At today*s postage 
prices, please don't expect 
someone in a far-off state to 
spend his own money to send 
you one of his cards. Many 
will, but many won't also. 

If you use a distinctive 
QSL card, filled out properly^ 
with a polite thank you and a 
line or two about yourself on 
the back, together with an 
SASE, FN guarantee you a 
95% return rate (excluding 
calamities at the Post Office). 

Have I made it sound 
easy? Well, it's not! It's hard 
work and at times very frus- 
trating. QRM will be your 
biggest problem. Remember, 
all you have to get is the RST 
reports both ways to have a 
valid QSO. 



Summary 

Let's summarize 
we've covered: 



what 



1. To earn your WAS, 
youVe going to have to 
make it your goal. That 
means work for it, 

2. IVl a ke your check-off 
list. 

3. Maximize your an- 
tenna and ground 
systems. 

4. Use an antenna 
tuner and swr meter. 

5. Get a T'R switch if 
you don't have one al- 
ready, 

6. Spend time on the 
air and listen for the 
states you need. 

7* Get a Callbook and 
be able to use it 
quickly, 

8. Plan your operating 
time to take greatest 
advantage of open 
bands (prime time^. 
9- Take advantage of 
special operating events 
or state QSO parties. 

10, Be alert and keep 
thinking. 

1 1 . Listen for the weak 
ones. 

Lastly, you're going to 
have to took at yourself and 
evaluate yourself a little. If 
you're having trouble getting 
those states, maybe it*s some- 
thing you're doing wrong. 
Change your operating habits. 
Get on the air at different 
times than you did before* 
Listen longer. Listen harder. 

Well, I've done all I can 
do. Those 50 states are out 
there waiting for you. It's a 
great challenge and a fine 
reward to work all states. 
Good luck to you. ■ 



Tracking 

the Hamburglar 



RIPPED OFF: Hallicrafters FPM300 
MKII, s/n K53O010, taken during 
break'tn at home weekend of July 22, 
1977. Bronx 52nd Police Precinct 
complaint no, 4565, Marty Green- 
baum K2HTG, 3070 Hull Avenue, 
Bronx NY. Tel, 1212) 231 3635. 

SHAMGHAIED: Heath Model 2021 
handie-talkie with Model 201 touch- 
tone pad built-in. Channel switch 
wired wrong in that channels 3, 4, and 



5 go to crystal sockets 3, 2, and 1, 
Crystalled for 146.52 (ch. 3), 146.655 
{ch. 4), and 146.94 (ch. 5). Stolen 
Jyty 23, 1977 in Westpon, Connecti- 
cut. S. W, Daskam K1 POK, 33 Settlers 
Trail, Stamford CT 06903, (203) 
329-0187. 

LOOTED: Clegg FM27B, s/n 4647 
was taken from my truck on August 
11, 1977. Contact: K1ZUW, PO Box 
102, Hudson NH 03051. 



STOLEN: Clegg Mark 111, 2 meter 
transceiver, serial 750,187 with 
.52-. 52 from Dick Haskm W6KEC, 
149 Maura Loa Dr., Monrovia CA 
91016. 

STOLEN: DrBke TR 4 SSB transceiver 
#16491, AC'3 power supply #18572, 
L-48 linear amplifier #1102, L-4PS 
power supply ^1124, Hallicrafters 
SX-100 receiver #151257. These 
items were stolen in a break-tn on 
April 27, 1977, at a local radio store 
in Louisville KY, where they were 
held on consignment for Ev Ballard 
WA4ACJ. Any information would be 
appreciated. Contact him collect at 
502-451-8923 or 812 294 4819. or 
write 2438 Longest Ave,, LoutsviMe 
KY» (Also Jefferson County Police 
Department, 502-538-2111,) 



PURLOINED: Standard SRC 826 M 2 
meter FM transceiver, SN: 104207. 
Stolen on June 27, 1977 from Bijl 
Myers WB0MCS, 942 E. Mississippi, 
Denver CO 802 10. 303-777-3353. Has 
the following frequencies installed: 
146,94-94, 52 52. 16-76, 34-94. 
28 33. 8B-88, 31-91, 148.01-01, 
37-97, 19-79, 2&-S5, and 91-31, Has 
K0KGA scribed on receiver boardn 
Receiver crystal board has been re- 
built Channel 12 - 91-31 transmit is 
450 cps. high in frequency; transmit 
trimmer for this channel is different 
from others. 

RIPPED OFF- Jcom IC-22A,s/n 9900 
with 12 sets of crystals. Cali and SS 
no. etched on bacl^. Pete Jordan 
WA1AXK, 832 Temple Street, Whit- 
man MA 02382. 



41 



Webb Simmons 
15B9 Alcata Place 
San Diego CA 92111 



Fool the Wire Wizard 



- - a computer would have helped 



Once upon a time, far, fer 
away^ there lived a wire 
wizard. The time was during 
World War II, and the place 
was on a US Navy warship. 
The wizard was an old Navy 
warrant officer with a nimble 
brain thai was like a bear trap 
for facts of every description. 
One of his many skills was 
the ability to quickly give 



almost any information about 
soft drawn copper wire. For 
example: What Is the resis* 
tance of 533 yards of 13 

gauge wire? What is the cross 
section area of 33 gauge wire? 

Mr. Steele, for that was his 
name, had a habit that just 
about drove me to distrac- 
tion* He liked to bet on 
various matters. He always 



RdsistanoQ 


Gaug« 


Diameitr 


€tassS#ctlon 


(Ohmi) 




(mils) 


Area (CM .) 


J 25 


1 


283 


80000 


.156 


2 


253 


64000 


,18S 


3 


226 


51200 


.2S 


4 


200 


40000 


.ai3 


5 


179 


32000 


,39 


€ 


160 


25600 


3 


7 


141 


20000 


.625 


S 


126 


leooo 


.781 


9 


113 


12800 


1 


10 


100 


1 000 1 0000 


1.25 


11 


89.4 


8000 


1.56 


12 


80 


6400 


2 


13 


70J 


5000 


2,5 


14 


63.2 


44000 


3.13 


15 


56.6 


3200 


4 


ie 


50 


2500 


5 


17 


44J 


2000 


6.25 


18 


40 


1600 


8 


19 


35,4 


1250 


10 


20 


31.6 


1000 


12-5 


21 


28.3 


800 


16 


22 


25 


625 


20 


23 


22.4 


500 


25 


24 


20 


400 



Table L The characteristics of soft drawn copper wire as 
developed by the wire wizard. 



bet exactly $5.00^ and he 
never lost a bet. When I 
would bet with him, he 
would tell me I was foolish 
because I knew he never lost 
But, what the hell, I knew I 
was right this time (the this 
was for every time). But 1 
wasn't, and he won again. 
One time he asked me who 
invented the audio amplifier* 
I replied, *'Dr. Lee De Forest, 
who invented the audion 
{triode vacuum tube)." 

"Nope/' he said, "some- 
one invented an audio ampli- 
fier before him.*' 

"Who?" said I. 

•*Thomas Edison, that's 
who," 

Aha! I had him. Old 

Tommy invented a passel of 
things, but not an audio 
amplifier. But I tost again 
because Edison invented a 
carbon microphone, and this 
was easily shown to be an 
audio amplifier. When the 
earpiece was placed over the 
mouthpiece of an old- 
fashioned country telephone, 
the thing would whistle on its 
own* 

All of us pestered Mr. 
Steele to tell us how he could 
produce wire table facts so 



quickly, but he would never 
say. One day I asked him if 
he always bet when he knew 
he would win. ''Absolutely," 
was his reply, "that is a 
cardinal principle with me/' I 
then bet him $5.00 he could 
not teach me his wire table 
methods. Now he was boxed 
in. He thought about it a 
little^ and then he told me he 
wouldn't bet because ! might 
be too stupid to understand 
even though the method was 
simple. However, he offered 
to teach me on the sole con- 
dition that I would never te!l 
it to anyone else on the ship. 
That particular ship has 
rusted on the bottom of the 
Pacific Ocean for more than 
30 years now, so it seems 
fairly safe that I can now 
speak freely on the matter. 

He told me to take a lined 
tablet and, on one of the lines 
about a third of the way 
down the pag^, to write the 
numbers 1, 10, 100, 1000, 
and 10000. He said that 
among these numbers was a 
fairly typical wire gauge 
which I was to select It could 
only be ten gauge. One gauge 
is possible, but not common, 
while the other numbers are 
ridiculous as a wire size. 

Mr. Steele then asked how 
the resistance of copper wire 
is given. The answer to this is 
in Ohms per 1000 feet, which 
takes care of the 1000 on the 
line of numbers. One can 
compute the cross section of 
a wire in circular mils by 
squaring the diameter in mils 
(a mil is 1/1000 of an inch). 
1 -1 = 1 is no help because it 
uses one value for two dif- 
ferent data. We can't use 
10*10 = 100 because 10 is 
already spoken for as the 
gauge number* The only 
other possibility is 100*100 = 
10000 to give us a diameter 
of 100 mils and a cross 
section of 10000 circular 
mils. The 1 that remains is 
the resistance of one Ohm per 
1 000 feet. 

There you have it for 10 
gauge, soft drawn copper 
wire. One Ohm per 1000 feet, 
100 mils diameter and 10000 
circular mils cross section. 

**Now,'' he said, "number 



42 



upward and downward from 
the 10 for the wire size/' So 
above the 10 in a column I 
placed 1 through 9^ and 
below the 10 I wrote 11, 12^ 
etc, until I got to the bottom 
of the page, in the resistance 
column, he told me to skip 
two lines and double, skip 
two more and double a^in, 
Btc.^ to give 2 Ohms for 13 
gauge, 4 Ohms for 16 gauge^ 
8 Ohms for 19 gauge, etc. As 
the resistance goes up, the 
cross section goes down in 
the same proportion; thus the 



cross section for 1 3 gauge 
wire is 5000 circular mils, 16 
gauge is 2500, and so forth. 

After doing all of these 
and taking square roots of the 
area to get the diameters, I 
still had many gaps in the 
table. The next step was to go 
ten places on the size and 
increase the resistance by ten 
times to give us 10 Ohms per 
1000 feet for 20 gauge wire. 
Now we can go up from 20 
gauge to fill in for gauges 17, 
14, 1 1 J 8, etc. From 1 1 gauge 
we can go down 10 for 21 



gauge, and so forth. In a very 
short time we get the com- 
plete table as shown in Table 
1. 

It is a pity this table is not 
quite exact, but it is close 
enough for any practical 
purpose. Mr. Steele also 
showed me how all of these 
numbers can be read from an 
ordinary slide rule- I will not 
go into this because slide 
rules are now ancient history. 

Now I can't rightly say 
how this discussion of soft 
drawn copper wire will 



improve your life unless you 
join up with a few nuts like 
we were with entirely too 
much free time on our hands 
during the big blowout. An 
interesting coincidence to me 
is the fact that a wire three 
gauge numbers smaller than 
another can handle only half 
the power (it is half the size), 
and cutting the power in half 
is a change of 3 dB (decibels). 
In like manner, a change of 
six gauge numbers changes 
the power capacity by 6 dB, 
and so forth. ■ 



De WA3ETD 



Oscar Orbits 



John Molnar WA3ETD 
Executive Editor 

WIN MONEY! 
A new contest is starting in Z? this 
month that should Interest authors 
and readers alike^ Get ready for this 
one! 

The author of the best article pub- 
lished each morith will receive a check 
ior $100 — in addition to our regular 
payment for the article- 1 car hear the 
questions now! How wilt the winning 
author be selected? Mot by the staff, 
that's for sure . - . otherwise I would 
insure that my editorial would win 
each month! 

The readership of 73 will select the 
winning article each month by voting 
on the reader service card in the back 
of the magazine. It's simpte to cast 
your vote. On the bottom of the 
reader service card there will be a 
small box with the word "Winner" 
close by. Place the p3ge number oi the 
article's title page in the box, This 
eliminates all possibility of confusion, 
as some issues contain multiple 
articles by the same author. After 
voting, make sure to fiN in the rest of 
the reader service card — advertisers 
appreciate the attention^ and hope- 
fully will continue to manufacture 
ham gear! Each month Dynamic 
Doreen {5'7'\ blond, blue eyes) will 
present me with the totals indicating 
the winner. In order to avoid con- 
fusion and late votes, each month's 
ballots will be accepted untii the next 
issue of 73 is mailed. Start writing, 
authors! An extra C-note will go a 
long way toward a major piece of new 
gear. 

An additional Christmas present 
will be presented to the best article of 
the year, voted upon in the December 
issue. The yearly top prize is a check 
for $500! Dream about that for 
awhile! 

We have not forgotten those readers 
who vote each month. A periodic 
drawing will be heJd from all reader 
sef'vice cards containing a vote. If you 



need a nice piece of new gear for your 
shack, this might be the way to get it. 
Drawing dates will be announced well 
in advance. 



ID GHz 

Well, as promised, I finally com- 
pieted an article on the Gunnplexet* 
transceiver. If you have b^en follow- 
ing this column, you know that the 
Gunnplexer is a microwave front end 
that can be used in communications 
systems and Doppler radar devices. 
Working with microwaves is fun, and I 
think you wiJI enjoy experitnenting 
with Gunnplexers if you are into UHF 
tinkering. My article concerning the 
transceiver is in this issue, and it can 
be buiit for under S200 — depending 
on the state of your junk box. Cost Is 
much lower If you use a broadcast FM 
radio as an i-f receiver* 

Microwave Associates, the outfit 
that makes the Gunnplexer, has an 
interesting information package con- 
cerning experiments with amateur 
microwave equipment. Most of the 
serious experiments have taken place 
in Europe and England. Hopefully it 
won't be long before American hams 
get going on 10 GHz, 

Don't faii to keep me posted of 
your experiments with the Gunn- 
plexars. I will respond to any and all 
related correspondence. I'll see if I can 
talk Wayne into a prize for the best 
microwave article of the year — check 
here next month. 

COMING EVENTS 

Our OSCAR special issue is next 
month (November issue). You won't 
want to miss this one, as it is full of 
info about the new satellite. There are 
also plenty of new antenna projects — 
especially related to portable opera- 
tion. I just buiK a 432 MHz circular 
polarized groundplane from one of 
the articles, and it works great. Details 
about the new Russian satellites will 
also be provided. Make sure your 
subscription is up to date! 





0Bar 6 Orbital Itrf^rrnation 







scar 7 Orbitsi InformstJon 


Orbit 


Date 


time 


Lanaituds 


Orbit 


Dste 


Time 


Longiturie 






mt) 


fGMTl 


□f Eq. 




(Oct) 


(GMT) 


Crassina'^^ 


N 


33682 


1 


0014:67 


e7.3 


131 59 B 


1 


0141:56 


80.0 


HA 


2269S BTW 


2 


0109:52 


BL1 


13171 A 


2 


0041:16 


64.9 


N 


22707 


3 


0009-43 


&6.1 


13164 60 


3 


0135:33 


78,4 


MA 


22720 STN 


4 


0104:44 


7SJ 


I3l9e A 


4 


0034:54 


63 3 


NA 


22732 BTN 


S 


0004:40 


64.9 


13209 BX 


5 


0129:11 


76.9 


N 


227 4S 


3 


0059:36 


78.6 


13221 A 


6 


0028:32 


61.7 


NA 


227S8 STN 


7 


0154:31 


92.4 


13234 B 


7 


0122:49 


75.3 


H 


22770 


3 


0054:27 


77,4 


13246 A 


B 


0022:09 


60.1 


NA 


22783 BTN 


9 


0149:23 


91.1 


13259 B 


9 


0116:27 


78,7 


N 


227B& 


10 


0049:19 


76.1 


13271 A 


10 


0015:47 


58,5 


NA 


22tiC>a BTN 


11 


0144:14 


89.9 


13284 B 


11 


0110:04 


72,3 


NA 


22320 &TN 


12 


0044:10 


74.9 


13296 AX 


12 


0000i2& 


57.0 


N 


22B33 


13 


0139:06 


88. 6 


13309 8 


13 


0103:42 


70,6 


NA 


22845 BTIM 


14 


003EJ:DC 


73,6 


13321 A 


14 


0003:03 


55. 4 


N 


22858 


15 


0l33:&a 


87,4 


13334 B 


1& 


0067:20 


69.0 


NA 


22S70BTN 


16 


0033:54 


72.4 


13347 A 


16 


0151:37 


83.6 


N 


228S3 


17 


0128:49 


36.1 


13359 BQ 


17 


0050:58 


67. S 


NA 


22695 BTN 


13 


0028:45 


71,1 


13372 A 


18 


014a:ia 


31.0 


NA 


22908 BTN 


13 


0123:41 


S4.9 


13384 BX 


19 


0044:35 


65,9 


N 


22920 


20 


0023:37 


69,9 


13397 A 


20 


0138:53 


79.5 


NA 


22933 BTN 


21 


0118:32 


B3.6 


13409 B 


21 


0033:13 


64.3 


N 


22S45 


22 


0018:28 


68.7 


13422 A 


22 


0132:30 


77.9 


NA 


229 &e BTN 


23 


0113:24 


B2.4 


13434 B 


23 


0031:51 


B^7 


N 


22970 


24 


0013:20 


S7.4 


13447 A 


24 


0126:08 


76.3 


NA 


J29B3 BTN 


2S 


0103:16 


8K2 


13455 B 


25 


0025:29 


61.2 


NA 


2299S BTIM 


26 


0008:12 


66,2 


13472 AX 


26 


0119:4e 


74.8 


N 


23008 


27 


0103:07 


79.9 


13484 B 


27 


0019:06 


59.6 


NA 


23020 BTN 


28 


0003 03 


B4.e 


13497 A 


28 


0113:34 


73,2 


M 


23033 


29 


0057:59 


73.7 


13509 B 


29 


0012:44 


B8.0 


NA 


23P46 BTiS 


30 


0152:54 


92.4 


13S22 A 


30 


0107:01 


71.6 


N 


23053 


31 


0052:50 


77.4 


13534 BQ 


31 


0006:22 


B6.& 



w 



The fisted data tells you the time 3nd place OSCAR crosses the equator in an 
ascending orbit for the first time each day. To calculate successive orbits, make 
a list of the first orbit number and the rte^^t twelve orbits for that day. List the 
time of the first orbit, Each successive orbit Is n 5 minutes later (two hours less 
five minutes). The chart gives the longitude of the first crossing. Add 29^ for 
each succeeding orbit When OSCAR is ascending on the other side of the 
world, it will descend over you. To find the equatorial descending longitude, 
subtract 166 degrees from the ascending longitude. To find the time it passes 
the north pole, add 29 minutes to the time it passes the equator. You should be 
able to hear OSCAR when it is within 45 degrees of you. The easiest way to do 
this is to take a globe and draw a circie with a radius of 2480 miles (4000 
kilometers) from the home QTH. ff it passes right overhead, you should be able 
to hear it for about 24 minutes totaL OSCAR wilJ pass an imaginary line drawn 
from San Francisco to Norfolk about 12 minutes after passing the equator. 
Add about a minute for each 200 miles that you live north of this line. If 
OSCAR passes 15 degrees from you. add another minute; at 30 degrees, three 
minutes; at 45 degrees, ten minutes. 



OSCAR 6: Input 
145.90-146,00 MHz; Output 
29.45-29.55 MHz; Tetemetry 
beacon at 29.45 MHz. 
OSCAR 7 Mode A: Input 



145.85-145.95 MHz; Output 
29.40 29.50 MHz. 
Mode B : Input 
432.125432.175 MHz; Out- 
put 145.925^145.975 MHz. 



Orbits designated "X" are closed to general use. "ED" are for educational 
use. "BTN" orbits contain news bulletins. "Q" orbits have a ten Watt erp limit. 
"L" indicates link orbit. "N" or "S" indicates that Oscar 6 is available o^/)/ on 
northbound or southbound passes. Satellites are not availabie to users on "NA" 
days. 



43 



^tm 



Ultra Simple 



Diode Checker 



-- for grab bag specials 



Marion D. Kitchens K4GOK 
7100 Mesrcuiy Ave. 
Hay market VA 22069 



This simple diode checker 
is an up-io-date version 
of an idea that has been 
around for a number of years, 
[t can be built in one or two 
evenings from the parts in 
most experimenters' junk 
boxes. The parts required are 
one resistor, two LEDs, and 
any 117 V ac transformer 
that will provide from 3 to 25 
V ac. Discarded audio inter- 
stage transformers from old 
tube-type radios and TVs can 
be used. If all new parts are 



HTVAC 



RLIMIT 
— w^— 



ID 



RAHSFORMER 
(SEE TEXT) 





DIODE UUDER TEST 



Fig. /. Schematic 



bougtit, the cost will be about 
$5,00j including the small 
aluminum box. The small 
cost can be recovered many 
times over by buying un- 
marked, untested, manufac- 
turers' closeouts, diodes by 
the pound, etc, available 
from most discount mail- 
order houses (like Poly Paks). 
Bad diodes can cause disas- 
trous results in some circuits 
and can be difficult to detect 
and locate in other circuits. It 
is a wise precaution to check 
them all before installation. 
This simple diode checker 
was conceived and built for 
just such purposes. 

The Circuit 

The simple schematic Is 
shown in Fig. 1. The trans- 
former provides a low ac volt- 
age, through the current 
limiting resistor, to two LEDs 
connected back-to-back. The 
diode to be tested is con* 
nected in series with this 
combination and the return 
side of the transformer. The 



LED 2 



^LIMIT 



LEDs will respond to the four 
possible conditions of the 
diode under test. If the diode 
is open, no current flows and 
neither LED will light. If the 
diode is shorted ^ one half 
cycle of the ac voltage will 
light LED1 and the other half 
cycle will light LED2, Since 
each LED is lit 60 times per 
second, a shorted diode will 
cause both LEDs to appear lit 
continuously- If the diode is 
good, LED! will light v^en 
the diode^s anode is toward 
the return side of the trans- 
former and LED2 will light 
when the diode's cathode is 
toward the transformer re- 
turn side. By proper physical 
arrangement of the LEDs and 
diode, the LED near the 
diode's cathode will always 

light. 

The resistor should be 
sized to limit the current 
through the LEDs to about 
10 mA. Most LEDs will have 
a voltage drop of about 1 .5 
volts across them, and most 
signal-type diodes will have 
from 0,1 (germanium) to 0.5 
(silicon) volts drop across 
them. The resistor value can 



then be found by subtracting 




LED 1 



Fig. 2. Parts placement drawing. 




Fig, 3, PC board layout. 



44 






Finished^ labeled checker. 



Assembled circuit board. 



these two voltages (say 1.5 
and 0.5) from the trans- 
former voltage and dividing 
by 10 mA: 



R = 



VXFMR- 1-5-0-5 
,OtO 



For a 6.3 V ac trans- 
former, the resistor value is 
430 Ohms. A 330 or 470 
Ohm resistor will do. Its value 
is not critical. 

Construction 

The simple circuit lends 
itself well to point-to-point 
v^irlng, which is probably the 
quickest way to build the 
checker. If the builder prefers 
a neater appearance, the 
printed circuit board layout 
shown in Fig. 3 can be used, 
tt is easy to duplicate with an 
etch-resist pen, or, if a profes- 



sional look is desired, by 
photographic means. Fig. 2 
shows the parts placement for 
the circuit board, and Fig. 4 
shows the matching hole loca- 
tions for mounting it in a4 x 
2-1/8 X 1-5/8 box. A Radio 
Shack 6.3 volt transformer, 
stock number 273-1 384^ was 
used for the circuit board 
layout and hole patterns. No 
on/ofF switch is used; the unit 
is sinnply plugged in for use. 
A TV cheater cord plug and 
socket are used so that the 
diode checker is easy to store 
without dangling ac cords 
everywhere- 

Pin jacks, banana jacks, or 
five- way binding posts can be 
used for connecting to the 
diode to be tested. The 
binding posts allow for a 
variety of connections to 
diodes that cannot be 







brought directly to the 
checker* Adapters with a 
V-notch are used so that 
loose diodes can easily be 
dropped into place for 
testing. Fig. 5 shows two easy 
methods of making such 
adapters. 

The holes should be cut in 
the box, and it should be 
painted and labeled to suit 
the builder's taste. The 



photographs show how I did 
it. The current limiting re^ 
sistor and transformer should 
be mounted to the circuit 
board next. The ac plug and 
pin or banana jacks should 
then be mounted in the box, 
with short lengths of wire 
soldered to them as shown in 
the photographs. Next, insert 
the LEDs and bend their 
leads so that they will not fall 



i &^e 




Fig. 4. Hole pattern fora4x 2-7/8 x 1-5/8 inch box. Cut holes 
to fit parts on hand. Holes are centered on center/ ine of box. 



e-RA&S SHIM 
STOCK 



^ 




SPADE LUG 



ff^ 




/ 

fT^ 



V 



SOLDER TO SPADE LUG 

4N10 QENP AI^OL/ND 
FOR TISHT FIT m 
SANANA FLUQ 



FOR BANANA PLUGS 



NO, 14 WIRE 
SOLDEREO H^ 
SPAOE LUG 



— ^FOP PIN JACKS 



Box with jacks and ac plug ready for circuit board installation. 



Fig. 5. Adapters. 



45 






x^ 



^'•^ 



•? 



:•>. tii-;-^|p»>^« . 



Box with PC board installed 



Finished diode checker in use. 



out. Do not solder them yet- 
The LED leads must be long 
enough for the LEDs to pro- 
trude through the box, so the 
builder may have to add short 
lengths of wire. Now feed the 
four wires from the ac plug 
and the jacks throu^ the 
proper holes in the circuit 
board, check for proper fit 
and clearance, and solder the 
four wires. Position the LEDs 



and solder them to the circuit 
board. Put insulation on the 
inside of the box bottom to 
prevent any possibility of 
shorts to the circuit board. 
Don't forget that it has 11 7 V 
ac on iti Make adapters to 
fit your jacks and you are 
ready to check out the unit 
Test the checker by apply- 
ing power to the 117 V ac 
plug. Neither LED should 



lig^t Now put a short circuit 
across the jack terminals and 
both LEDs should light. A 
diode that is known to be 
good should now be con- 
nected across the [ack 
terminals. The LED cfosesi to 
the diode's cathode should 
li^t. Try it both ways to 
make sure the LEDs are 
oriented properly- 
After building and using 



this simple diode checker^ the 
owner wilt find a desire to 
also know if the diode under 
test IS silicon or germanium. 
Since a germanium diode will 
develop about 0/1 volts across 
itself and a silicon diode 
about 0.5 voiis^ it seems that 
some very simple circuit 
might be devised that would 
light an LED if the diode 
under test were silicon, ■ 



on r:oo:is d^^r 

1 






<^ r * > *- ^ f 






. 0' 

bu: 

yo \ 

i rTTTTiTTT Tha' you 

t e I i 1- ■ a B p L ] that s } t e ^ h o u 







P V 



SSB rig. Unless you're an engineer, 
Vou might just as well pack it away. 
Six is cheap, it's dirty, and what is 
more to the point, if we don't use it, 
we are going to lose it. 

This didn't start out to be a 
sermon, but I've $aid it and I'll stick 
by it. 

Lawrence Day WB7EAX 
Phoenix AZ 



from psge 14 

same information. It was natural to 
turn first to OUR association which 
should have such information aivail- 

To date, t haive never received a 
reply or any assistance. Only as a last 
resort did I write 73 . . . and pronto! 
You reacted with immediate and suc- 
oessfx^i results. 

Thank you again, many times. 

Ervin Jackson Jr, 
Charlotte NC 

Afow you know where ta turn firsts 
Bfvinf -JM, 



CQSIX 

Just a line to let you and your 
readers know that 6 meter AM is alive 
and we!t in Phoenix. Despite ugly 
rumors and specylation, our group is 
growing steadily and, with summer 
skip, widely r We operate two nets on 
50,34 MHz - the Arizona Cactus Net 



on Tuesday at 0200 GMT wr^d the 
Phoenix VHF Nei on Wednesday at 
0300 GMT. We have a calling fre- 
quency of 50.34 and it is monitored 
from 1400 GMT to 0500 GMT. We 
hope that some of your readers will 
look for us on 6 and relive som^ of 
tfKKe good old AM days. 

Before you mention TV!, I'M say 
that I have had and continue to have 
some on 1 5 meters and on 80 meters 
too. White TV I is more likeiy to be s 
problem on 6 with channel 2. the 3rd 
harmonic of 21 MHz is fight in the 
middle of channel 3, These problems 
can and are worked out every day by 
hams across the country. Nothing can 
surpass resolve. 

Por the new operator, this is the 
onEy way to get your own phone rig 
on the air; ^]th a minimum of time, 
cost^ and technical ability. While SS6 
is the best way to go for reliable 
communication, It is also the cost] test 
and the more complex. Further, it 
makes appliance operators out of us» 
taking away our Inventiveness, skill, 
and that thirst for knowledge. Just try 
to build as your fir^ rig a home brew 



BAND PLAN 



"Amplitude modulation and side- 
band can live toother on 10 meta^ if 
there is sersib^e band planning," aid 
Norm Lefcourt W6IRT. chairman of 
the recently created Southern Cali- 
fornia 10 Meter AM/SSS Band Plan- 
ning Coyncil. Lefoourt, noting the 
recent proliferation of conversion 
plans for CB rigs to 10 meters and the 
various proposals for channelization 
of the popular HF band, said unless 
everybody settles on a single band 
plan, no one will be able to talk lo 
anyone. "Using crystal controlled 
transceivers/' he continued, "makes 
the need for a single, widely accepted 
band mandatory - we have to be able 
to Mvork each other on common fre- 
quencies." 

"Some people want frequencies 
above 29.0 MHz, others are advo- 
cating AM frequencies In what has 
been sideband territory, some want 
monitoring frequencies at 28, fi* and 
others have suggested ysing other 
monitoring freuqencies 5 to SOO kHz 



away/' he said. "It is very confusing/* 
Council members tentatively 
approved a ''comprehensive band 
plan" for 10 meters which begins in 
the sideband portion and ends in that 
part of the band which is novy used by 
most of the AM operators. 'That's 
very importantn" said Lefcourt, ''be- 
cause we don't want to exclude 
anyone/' Most commercial C6 rigs 
which have single sideband capability 
are also able to transmit and receive 
AM phone signals. 

The Councirs plan places channel 1 
at 28.560. TS95 MHz above the 
eacisting channel 1 on CB radios. The 
ratio remains constant on each new 10 
rrteter channel, so that channel 23 is 
1.895 MHz higher than C6 channel 
23: new channel 40 also is 1.595 MHz 
hrgher than CB channel 40, so the 
conversion plan will work just as well 
for 40-channel rigs as it does for 
23-channe! sets. 

'This band plan puts our new 
channel 4 at 23.6, a commonly used 
SSB nronitorlng frequency, and our 
new channel 20 will fall at 28.S MHz. 
the frequency generally used as an AM 
monitorir^g channel/' said Lefcourt. 
"Incidentally, with this band plan, 
channel 40 fails at 29.0 MHz/' 

The council voted to make public 
its "tentative list" of 10 meter chan- 
nels and indicated that a "final recom- 
merxJed list" would be forthcoming 
after other amateurs from around the 
country have had a chance to com- 

Cbn tinued on page 50 



46 



-foM, I've about 

petiDEP To OPD8R 
ANEW RO&OTSSTV 

CO N ve RTg-R ^ Exc e pt 
I'm not sure I <:Af4 

INSTALL IT P(?oPERLy. 

i$ I n$Ta ll ATi o M 

DtFPKULT? 



fsuouLDwY Take 

MINCJteSOR so 
TfM.TwERe'iS NOT 

Mt/cH (MVOLVEt?* 
ALL l^eCONAifCT- 

|W& CABLE'S APe 
SUppilEp^ 50 ALL 

VOU HAVE ro DO 




lt)|v1,D0) TUNE MV TRAN see I V^B 
FOR SSTV THe SAfAE WAY AS FoP_AW 
AUOlO TRANSMISSION 7 



^>? 



' ';•. 



fji 



^^ 



■^c? 



.^ 



'eVACTLV/ TU5TZa?0BeAT To THE $T 

T/ow VOL/ 'Re copy /N 6, awd from -weee 
oM -iHg ROBor^:ow\/ee-rgp^ adcairjuv 

A TV IMA<^e O/Vi YOUR MOAirroR . 



t c?0N'r havf TO 

MODIPYAN/YOF 
MY e<PdlPME/V/T? 




tUO.lQSr PLU& THE 
' CABLe FROM THe 

ROBOT COt^^^^BR 
INTO IHe M I C rACK 
OFYOUf? -TRANS — 

ceiveR^ AND coN- 

NE'cr-fWG OTHFR 

LEAP FI?Of/l VOUR 
ROBOT CO NY6(?reR 

To YOUR SP^AKET? 

TERMINAL IN PAR- 
RALLFL WITH THE" 
LOUDSPEAKER. 
1>^AT'S ALL TU ERE 
6 To IT. 




YEAM, euTHoWCAN I 

1HUL IP-rHeS(6WAL 

I'M MEARlNfe IS AN 

SSTV SI6/VALT 



1WE5SrvSI6rVAL 

HAS A VE/?y 
O/STlMCTIV/e 

SOUWD, TIM — 

COMRLETeLYDlPF- 

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(FMootiSTe^ Foie 

A WWILE, y0U'£.L 

H£A/e-rw£ SSTV 

STaT/OA/^ VfiRPAL 
ID TWAT^ REcpaiRBD 
XHB 



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1WEM ALL I Do VOHEN I 
6ETMy CONVeRTE'R 15 
To MAKE TWO CABL£ CoH 

Nf cTiows^ Tliwe TO twe 

$TATlOA/ IIM W0RKtM6>^ 
ANO START eXCHAN&/A/6 
p/CTaR^S, 




THftT^iT. AN0ONC5 
YOU'LL A(7<?EeT?^e 

6^5* FOR -rwe- i^aBOT 

BCSTINVESTMEWT 
VOU GVE'R MA 



WRITE ToDAV 
F^OR yOUR SSTV 
FACT PACK PPOM 

ROeOT. IT^FREE 

ANOTtLLSVOU " " 
ABOUT SSTV/. 



IBOIJDT] 



ROBOT 

RESEARCH 
INC. 

7391 CONVOy CT. 
SAN DIEGO. CA 921 H 




47 



David E. Stan field 
3408 Cataiins Drive 
Atlanta GA 3Q341 



Beat 
the PC Shortage 



-- build (glue) your own! 



Between Radio Shack, 
Lafayette, and Heath kit, 
there were 37 retail electron- 
ics stores in the area, and I 
couldn't get my hands on a 
blank PC board larger than 2 
by 3 inches. As I required a 
bbard at least 6 by 8 inches, 
my choices in this prepos- 
terous situation weren't too 
attractive. 1 could abandon 
the project, wait for the Iqpal 
stores to restock, or try to get 
some by mail. None of these 
options appealed to me. I had 
already spent quite a number 



of hours laying out the art- 
work and wanted to get this 
project wrapped up. 

As so often happens, I 
didn't have a blinding flash of 
inspiration and suddenly 
solve this problem. In steady I 
waited until a local store 
finally got some in and then 
completed my project. But in 
the back of my mind, I felt a 
vague sense of frustration* 
Perhaps it was a sign of 
advancing paranoia, but I 
kept wondering when there 
would be another shortage. 



One evening a few months 
later^ I was half following 
something on television and 
thumbing through a copy of 
The Radio Amateur's Hand- 
book when I spotted an item 
that looked interesting. In the 
section covering construction 
techniques, they suggested 
using epoxy to glue strips of 
copper to an unclad board. 
The idea was to glue the 
strips where you wanted 
conductors. By doing so you 
could get around having to 



etch a board. 

Things clicked into place, 
and t immediately figured but 
the solution to any future 
shortages of circuit board. 
After all, if you could epoxy 
strips of copper to a board, it 
shouldn't be hard to epQxy 
an entire sheet of copper and 
make a real circuit board. 

A couple of days later, I 
had the epoxy, some sheet 
copper, and a piece of phe- 
nolic perf board- Following 
instructions, 1 cleaned the 
copper and phenolic board, 
mixed equal amounts of 
epoxy resin and hardener, and 

glued the copper to the piece 
of phenolic. I then placed 
them under a stack of books 
and left them overnight. Next 
morning I took a look at my 
circuit board and almost went 
into shock. When 1 gave the 
copper a little tug it peeled 
completely away from the 
board* 

Feeling that I must have 
done something wrong, I 
tried again. First, I made sure 
that room temperature was in 
the range they recommended. 
Next^ 1 used more weight to 
apply more pressure to the 
pieces while the epoxy was 
setting. Finally, I doubled the 
time for the epoxy to set 
from 12 to 24 hours. When 
that time had passed, I 
examined the board. As 
before^ the copper just pulled 
completely away from the 
phenolic- 




m^SI'S!.-^ i;ij«KJ4Sli!»tat.. .^wSjw i^ 



Fig. /. Tools and materials needed are a pair of scissors, a steel 
wool soap padj small pieces of cardboard cut from a filing 
card, contact cement, a sheet of copper and a phenolic board. 
The photographic roller is opt I on a i 




Fig. 2, Use the soap pad to thoroughly clean the surfaces of 
both the copper and the pbenollQ. 



48 




ts 'Hippie' fmof 



/ ? 



Rg. 3. Apply thin^ even coats of contact cement to the copper 

and phenolic using small pieces of cardboard cut from a filing 
card. 



I must admit that I felt 
foolish. Years of advertising 
had convinced me that one 
drop of epoxy will hold any- 
thing to any other thing. If 
there was an outside chance 
of some combination of 
materials being beyond the 
power of epoxy, I seemed to 
have found it. While many 
discoveries make you rich and 
famous, 1 felt that this wasn't 
one of them. 

At this point 1 used a little 
logic and deduced that 
commercially prepared circuit 
boards don't grow out of the 
ground, so there had to be 
some glue that woufd work. 
If I tested every glue 1 could 
find, it was probable that one 
of them would do the job- 
Dim memories of the thou- 
sands of experiments Thomas 
Edison performed when he 
was searching for a filament 
that would work in the elec- 
tric light g3.ve me inspiration. 
The saga of San Juan Hill lent 
me courage, and my local 
hardware store made a for- 
tune selling me a lot of glue. 

I don't intend to bore you 
with the details of every 



experiment I tried, but let me 
tell you about one that 
almost worked. In their 
advertisements, they refer to 
it as "Amazing," **lncredi- 
ble," "Stronger Than Steel,^' 
and "A Space-Age Miracle/* 
Well, it was. And fast. If I 
applied a drop of it to a piece 
of copper about an inch 
square and stuck the copper 
to a phenolic board, within a 
couple of seconds it was 
bonded tight. And once they 
had bonded I there was no 
way short of an atomic blast 
to separate them. 

The problem was that 
when 1 tried to spread that 
stuff over a piece of copper 
larger than one square inch, it 
started hardening before I 
could finish spreading it 
Once that happened, it 
wouldn't stick to anything. 
So if you feel like making 
some tiny circuit boards, give 
it a try. 

The Solution 

Persistence on my part was 
finally rewarded- When I tried 
contact cement, everything 
worked so well that I almost 

forgot my earlier disap- 




Fig. 4. After allowing the contact cement about ten minutes to 
dry^ carefully align the coated surfaces and press them 
together. 



pointments. Not only did it 
do a fine job of bonding 
copper to the board, but it 
also withstood prolonged 
soldering operations from a 
140 Watt gun after I had 
etched out a circuit. And 
since so many people use 
contact cement, it*s made by 
several companies, is priced 
fairly low, and comes in con- 
tainers ranging from small 
tubes to five gallon buckets. 

If you are interested in 
rolling your own PC boards, 
(et me quickly run through 
the procedure I use, I think 
you'll agree it's so simple that 
you won't have any hesita- 
tion about trying it> 

The first step is to gather 
up all of the materials re- 
quired. These include contact 



cement, phenolic board, and 
a steet of copper- Once 
you've made these purchases, 
you will want to round up 
the simple tools required 
These tools are a pair of sharp 
scissors, a steel wool soap 
pad, some pieces of thin card- 
board cut from a filing card 
and, if you have one, a photo- 
graphic roller. 

The copper sheets can be 
found in hobby shops. They 
are available in several thick- 
nesses, and I strongly recom- 
mend that you get the thin* 
nest you can find in order to 
keep down the time required 
for etching. You should be 
able to find contact cement 
at any hardware store or in 
the hardware section of most 
discount stores. Phenolic 




Fig. 5, / used a photographic rotter to apply even^ heavy 
pressure to the Joined pieces, but you can use the palms of 
your hands. 



49 



boards are available at Radio want to give it a try, sheets of 
Shack or similar stores. If you formica should work very 




Fig. 6. As your final step, trim away any excess copper with a 

pair of scissors. 



well in place of phenolic. 
Formica is available in many 
colors and patterns which 

could go a long way toward 
dressing up the average pro- 
ject. And I based on costs per 
square inch, formica is much 
cheaper than phenolic. 

Once you have these 
materials and toolsj begin by 
using the steel wool soap pad 
to thoroughly clean both the 
copper and phenolic on the 
sides you are going to apply 
the gjue. The copper sheets I 
bought were coated with a 
transparent film to keep air 
from conlaciing the copper. 
Since I felt this film might 
interfere with the bonding 
process, I removed it with the 
soap pad. If your copper 
lacks this coating it will prob- 
ably be heavily oxidizedj 
which means a good scrub- 
bing will be beneficial. 

The copper takes on a 
hi^ly polished appearance 
when it is properly cleaned. 
Once the entire sheet takes 
on a good shine, rinse it 
thoroughly and allow it to 



dry. Giving the phenolic a 
scrubbing helps to roughen its 
surface slightly and gets rid of 
any dirt or oil that might be 
present. Again, rinse carefuily 
and allow to dry. 

After the copper and 
phenolic are clean and dry, 
place them on some news- 
paper and apply the contact 
cement. Using small pieces of 
cardboard cut from a filing 
card, spread the contact 
cement evenly over the entire 
surfaces of both the phenolic 
and the copper. Strive for 
thin coats and work fairly 
rapidly. 

When both surfaces are 
properly coated, set them 
aside and allow them to dry 
for about ten minutes. Then 
carefully align the two coated 
surfaces and join them to- 
gether. Using either your 
hands or a roller, apply fairly 
heavy pressure to the pieces 
for a few seconds in order to 
insure good contact between 
them. Finally, trim away any 
excess copper with a pair of 
scissors. ■ 



CHI ftOQ:,B 



• ^ 




i i^-inrrrr Tha^ 


^/ Vrf. U f./ 4- ^ 


tell i.la hP:.] 




from page 46 


"We want to be 



* -^ 



^ h n ^ 



meiiL 



Tentative Frequency List 
Channel Designation Frequericy 

1 28.560 

2 2a-570 

3 28.580 

4 28.600 

5 28.610 

6 28.620 

7 28.630 
3 28.650 
9 28.660 

10 28.670 

1 T 28.680 

12 28.700 

13 28.710 

14 28.720 

15 28,730 

16 28.750 

17 28,760 

18 28.770 
IS 28.730 

20 28.300 

21 28.810 

22 28.820 

23 28,350 



hams," said Phil iCoge* W6MBa 
''because if they ^e^ sending their 
thoughts to magazines a* letters to the 
editor^ thef^'ll be hundreds of band 
plans but no real band pbrming." 
Kogel siked anyone with comments 
TO send them to him, W6MR0, 1245 
North Layrel Ave., Number 9, West 
Hollywood CA 90046. ''Please send a 
self addressed, stamped envelope if 
you wflht a reply/' he said. ''We don't 
have the funds to mail copies of our 
final frequency chart to everyone." 

John McAulay WA6QPL, a QRP 
sideband operator, said the council! 
will not advocate exclusive use of any 
freqyency by either AM or SS8. "Nor- 
mally, 5S8 is in \M low end, AM a 
couple of hundred kHz higher/' he 
said. "But there is no reason why or^ 
operator on SSB shouldn't enter a 
QSO with another on AM. As long ai 
they can understand each othier — 
that's all that counts." 

John English W86QKF, council 
vice-chairman, also pointed out that 
the council is giving some thought to 
planning a portion of the CW band for 



Novices. "Right now/' he said, "wt'rt 
thinking about 8 CW channels 
{28,105, 28.115, 28,125, 28.145, 
28.155, 28.165, 28.175. and 28.1951 
vi/hich would put low cost HF gear in 
the hands of Novice operators who 
can't afford to spend a lot of nioney 
on equipment." 

This fener reflects ihe oprnfon of the 
Southern Cafifornm tO Meier AM/S$8 
QRP Sand Pfafjnirjg Caurtcii, Whm a 
titM - JM, 

tn your June, 1977, t^ue, a band 
plan for CB/IOm conversion su99ests 
the use of the OSCAR downlink 
frsQueocis, Please! Please! — Don't, 

Since you need 230 kHt bandspace, 
t suggest you add 2.0 MHz to get 
28.96&29.25B. This hand pEan will be 
easy to relate to CB channels using 10 
meter spectrum that is less used than 
others. 

Don't forget the 10m Novice 
(28.1 28.2), the 10m DXer 
(28.5-28,8^, and most of all, OSCAR 
429.4-29.55), when preparing a poten- 
tiaUy heavily used band plan on 10 
meterSi. 

Even so — I vwouid strongly recom- 
mend SSB or FM in lieu of AM. If this 
plan becomes successful, AM will k»se 
in the end anyway^ 

My conversion of a CB set would 
consist of: 

1. Move frequencies to slot of 
interest 

a. AM (28.965-29.255) (why 
hassle the SS8 and OSCAR 



boys?) 

b. FM {28.965 29.255) 

c. SSB (28.665-28.955) ^think of 
the mobile DX work when the 
band is open) 

d. CW ( 28.466-29 J55) 

2. Disable AM modulator 

3. Install varactor FM modulator 

4. Install FM discriminator (careful 
use of AM detector wlH work) 

Yes — convert those rigs, but plan 
the new uss around existing use to 
add lo the hobby^ 

Bob Winchest^ WBLSS 
Midland Ml 

CB to 1 meters is giBat Past three 
issues bring this interesting phase of 
ham radio to the front. 

Keep pounding an this, Wayne; this 
could be the start of something big 
... big as 2m FM repeaters. We 
hams need to do something with the 
10 meter band or it will be given to 
the Cflers. 

I have my set all neady for its new 
crystais and am now putting up a 
modified CB beam to get active on 
lOiTi AM. 

Wilbur T. GoI^mi W5CD/4 
Panama City Beach FL 

Now is the lime to get a ftrm 
channelized band plan for 10 meters. 
We have seen two or three frequency 
plans, and if people use different sets 

Continued on page 53 



m 



Ralph Tenny 
452 Lynn St. 
RjChardson TX 7SQS0 



Identify 
That Transformer 



-- tips for using boat anchors 



The experimenter often 
relies on junk box parts 
and surplus electronic parts. 
Many power transformers are 
marked clearly, but even un- 
marked transformers are per- 
fectly usable after they have 
been tested and rated. 

Even the completely un- 
marked transformer will 
usually offer clues to its 
design. For example, the ac 
input leads (primary winding) 
are usually color-coded black. 
Other windings probably will 
be yellow or green. If the 
transformer has a large 
number of secondary wind* 
ings, it may have a high volt- 
age winding color-coded red, 
and other leads will be 
yellow, green and brown. If 



SLACK 




ifELLO* 


SLACK 


TTE^LOW 







any winding has a center lap, 
this wire usually is striped in 
the same color as the 
winding* For example, a 
yellow coded winding might 
have a yellow center tap with 
a blue stripe. 

Fig. 1 shows a transformer 
as a ** Black Box" - a unit 

with unknown characteristics 
which must be deduced* 
Begin by verifying that leads 
of the same color connect to 
the same winding and not to 
another winding. Then, 
measure the dc resistance of 
each winding. 

At this point, the black 
box of Fig. 1 has been 
indent! fled to the point 
shown fn Fig. 2. The next 
step is to apply line voltage to 
the black winding through a 



BLACK YELLOW 



irsfl 



2\S1 



SLACK 



YELLI3W 



Fig, 7, 



Fig, Z 



M) m*UQZ 




fh 




1/8 Ampere slow blow fuse 
and measure the voltage on 
the other winding. In this 
particular example, the ac 
scale on a VOM showed a 
no-load output from the 
secondary winding equal to 
12,5 volts* This was measured 
with 122 volts ac In (line 
voltage is high in Texas). 

The next Step is to load 
the transformer enough to 
determine a safe power 
rating. Since the transformer 
will be used for a dc supply, 
make a rectifler-fllter net- 
work as shown in Fig. 3. The 
capacitor value is not critical 
so long as the dc ripple under 
load is no more than 5% (a 
typical value might be 2000 
uF)* Remember that the volt- 
age rating for the capacitor 
must be greater than 1.4 
times the no-load transformer 
output voltage. For the trans- 



former under discussion: 1.4 
X 12.6 V dc is the minimum 
allowable voltage rating. 

Determine the current 
rating of the transformer by 
applying a dc load to the 
rectifier-fjiter network until 
the ac voltage of the output 
winding drops by 10%. This 
dc current rating then can be 
multiplied by the dc voltage 
to get a power rating* For the 
transformer illustrated, a 250 
milliamp dc load reduced the 
12*5 volt ac (open circuit) to 
113 volts. With that load, the 
dc out was .25 A x 11 .6 volts 
- 2.9 Watts. As a final check, 
weigh the transformer; allow 
about 1 ounce per Watt of 
power. 

The dc load for the trans- 
former can be power resis- 
tors, but the circuit of Fig. 4 
Is easy to build and is easily 
variable over a wide range, 
(Q3 is a power transistor and 
must be mounted on a heat 
sink.) Choose Rl with the 
formula Rl - *6/1 minimum; 
for 50 mA minimum load, Rl 
= .6/.05 = 12 Ohms, The 
upper current limit will be set 
by the value of Rl and the 
output voltage of the supply. 
For a 12 volt supply, the 
maximum current would be 
about 1 Ampere. 

The final check for any 
transformer is to operate it 
with rated load for several 
hours. If there is any problem 
with the transformer (shorted 
turns, etc.) or if the load is 
too high, the transformer will 
get hot. In general, transfornh 
ers run a little warm, but the 
transformer should not be 
too hot to touch comfort' 
ably. ■ 



SUPPLY ' 



;; 




TIS97 




T|P^»* 




TlS9t 



COM -i- 



IK 



■: 



fh 



Fig. 3. 



Fig. 4. 



51 



WUliam G. Moneysmith W4NFR 
109 CabbelDr, 
M^nassasPark VA 22110 



Subaudible 



Tone Encoder 



-- access 



those closed machines 



With the ever increas- 
ing two meter ac- 
tivitYi many repeater owners 
have chosen to incorporate 
PLj CG, or QC as a means of 
accessing their machines. A 
subaudible tone is required to 
access and maintain your 
sigial through the repeater. 
At the repeater site, a sub- 
audible tone decoder is inter- 
faced with the receiver. When 
a transmitted signal opens up 
the receiver, a subaudible 
tone must be present or\ the 
incoming audio^ so the de- 
coder will close a relay and 
permit the transmitter to key 
up and repeat the signal. All 
individual users must provide 
a means of generating a 
specific subaudible tone on 
their transmitted sigpai along 
with their voice audio. There 
are two main requirements, 
tone frequency and proper 
tone deviation of the carrier 
frequency. Tone frequency is 



determined by the particular 
repeater decoder frequency 
and the deviation level is 
usually around 350 to 500 
Hz, 



In areas where many dif- 
ferent repeaters are available, 
it is necessary to have more 
than |ust one tone encoder. 
This article describes a six 



Sw< 




ici X 






I 



C2 



-■*tTO iSVOC 



■*-G»lD 



R4 ^ 
!0OK \^ 



C7 



fl5 

?T^ 047 
I MYLAR 



r 



ca 

022 MYLAR 
■^l 






C3 



^h 



'^ ^"\/\j CP5 OUTPUT TO INSEWT]0« 
POINT 0#* TftAJNSMfTTEfl 
AUDIO BCr4RD mSEIITlON 
l>DINT WJiL WEQLHRE A LOAD- 
INS NESlSTOR. (VALUE PE- 
PEMDIMG OH Rl€ USED. iOK 10 
.i MEG FOynD EXPERIMEN.* 
TftLLYj 






i3a 






JdU 



JC5LI 






i 



J2 



RiC 



4 



TOtiC S£L SWITCH 



JD 



Rtl 



> 



JCsH. 



10 K TflM^0T5 
FREO AD J 



Fig, h Subaudihte tone encoder. 



channel subaudible encoder 
that works very welL The 
circuit is laid out on a T* x 
3" PC board. Parts are fairly 
common lo obtain and con- 
struction takes about an 
hour, 

The basic circuit is a twin 
T oscillator designed to 
operate in the subaudible 
tone range (93 to 1 70 Hz) for 
amateur use, It is versatile 
because the tones are adjust* 
able with 20 turn trimpots. 
The theory of operation can 
best be described by saying 
R4 and R5 and C6 form a 
low pass type network. C7 
and C8 and R6 and R7 form 
a high pass. As tfie phase 
shifts are opposite^ there is 
only one frequency at which 
the total phase shift from the 
collector to base is 180 de- 
grees, and DSciHation will 
occur at this frequency. 
Optimum operation results 
when C6 is approximately 
twice the capacitance of CI 
and C8, and R6 and R7 have 
a resistance about OJ that of 
R4 or R5.{R4 = R5}and(C7 
^ C8), Output is taken off 
from the collector of Ql via 
R2 and C3, 

By decreasing R6 and R7, 
the output lone will go 
higher. If R6 and R7 are 
increased, the output fre- 
quency will lower. This 
allows adjusimenL of oscil- 
lator to a precise output fre- 
quency, anywhere in the 
subaudible range. 

Frequency is set by feed- 
ing the output into a counter 
This will get you into the 
ball park. Adjustment of R7 
will bring the encoder to a 
precise frequency desired. 
Next, connect the encoder's 
output through an insertion 
resistor to an audio injection 
point on the transmitter 
audio board. The output of 
this encoder is quite high (1 
volt). An insertion resistor 
will be required. Values range 
from 1 Ok to 0.5 megs and is 
found experimentally and 
varies between rigs. Choose a 
value to obtain about 500 Hz 
of tone deviation. Key up 
transmitter; "fine'' tweak R7 
for reliable results with the 
repeater. Set up each trimpot 



52 



J mr 



12 VDC 




Swi 



swz 



S8888 8 




^BM 



si 



Fig. 2. PC board and component layout. 




REJD'NSV 

W^ihlJlDlO-^tO IMJCCTIOH POINT 
BLIC-GHD 



TO But LEAA 




80K MOUMTWfr HQtC? 



rf 

C 



H @ 16 VtlC 




.iMffl 






^W3 



3 ^ ^ « 



JhSUiJ^TIDM- 



]=' 



FREO 

SEL 

SWSTCH 



FRED ADJlJSTWENTS 



F/j. 3. Suggested layout of board in endmure. 



for a different required tone. 
The ability to have six 
individual tones will probably 
be a great asset in the near 
future of repeater users. More 
and more repeaters are going 
the su baud i fate route, because 
of the FCC monitoring 
requirement, and the many 
problems with co-repeater 
interference. This unit is easy 
and reasonable to build for 
around $18. It has been in 



Tone freq. range 


*Rx 


93 to 107 Hz = 


12k 


98 to 116 Hz - 


8.2k 


114 to 170 Hz = 


jumper 



Table h 



use for a couple of years with 
excellent reliability. ■ 

Parts List 

Q1 = Motorola IMPN 2N4124 
R1 =6.3k±5%yd W 
R2*100k±5% !/* W 
R3 = 36k±5% ViW 

R4, R5 = iook± r%y*w 

R6 = 3.3k±1%^^W 
R7'R12 - Bourns 20 turn "trim- 
pot" Model 3005P 10k 
CI = 100 uF @ 16V 
C2 = .02 uF disc 
C3 ^ .05 uF disc 
C4 == .OOS uF disc 
C5 = 20uF MPOdisc 
C6= .047 uF Mylar 
C7,C8-. 022 Mylar 
SW1 = Miniature SPOT switch 
SW2 - A LCD switch MRA-t-10 
1 P 10T rotary with knob 
Enclosure - 8ud Diecast Box 
(CU4 23 1% X 3-5/8 x 1-7/32) 






* # 



dc fi t ever i^rojic 




ttHll I^la Bp L 



from page 50 

of frequerKt^, we will have chaos- 
Rigs will have to be modified to travel 
from one area to another* 

We personally approve of the pian 
by WA4MFT, We are ready to buy rigs 
and modify them as soon 3S a firm set 
of frequencies can be estabHshed. 

Ed Johanson K7TE0 
Sandy UT 

John Oorociak WB7PQI 
Lsyton UT 

I am writing about your art ides on 
CB conversions to 10 meters. The 
Mokan chapter of 10-X International 
has sponsored our group to increase 
activity on 10. The whole project was 
started just before your first article on 
the subject, and after we had con- 
verted several rigs, we found out that 
yoy had proposed a different fre- 
quency scheme than w^ had 
I Murphy's ^wj. We favor a standard 
schefne that everyone can folkiw so 
that when the band opens, we do not 
cause inierfefence to everyone on the 



air. 

We favor the yse of 28.800 MHz 
because this ts the nationwide AM 
calling frequency and there are several 
nets, including the lOX net, on this 
frequency. We also favor keeping the 
channels low in frequency. The tower 
channels can in effect be DX channels, 
and the upper ones can be for rag 
chewing. There ts also the possibility 
that many people will use phase 
locked loop rigs which can be 
modified to create 70 or more chari- 
nels^ The frequency scheme we 
propose would allow a PLL rig to have 
60 channels and still not interfere 
with OSCAR satellite operations 
Well, here it Is — another frequency 
scheme'. 



annel 


Freq. 


1 


2S.690 


2 


28 J 


3 


28.71 


4 


28.73 


5 


28,74 


6 


28.75 


7 


28-76 


8 


28.73 



9 


28.79 


10* 


28.6 


11 


28. B1 


12 


28.83 


13 


28.84 


14 


28.85 


15 


28,86 


16 


28.88 


17 


28.89 


IS 


28.9 


19 


28.91 


20 


28.93 


21 


28.94 


22 


28.95 


23 


28.03 


40 


29,13 



* Universal calling frequency 

JaySprenkfeWBeOUG 
Kansas City MO 

What's the matter with you people 
at 73? I decided to convert a junk CB 
I picked up into a 10 meter rig; 
hovvever, after looking at all the TO 
meter conversion artictes, i was ready 
to give up. What good is a 10 meter 
AM rig H I am the only one with that 
set of frequencies? In aEI the letters 
and articles, I think there were nine 
different band plans, most claiming to 
be the best. 

I would like all the people v^o 
have converted CBs and who use 10 
metef AM often to drop me a note 
giving their band plan and most used 
frequencies. With this data, i virill 
determine the most used plan covering 
the most popular frequencies and re- 



port ii to ?3. 

Danrvt Hoi man WB9TCY 

729 Ziegler Rd. 

Madison Wl 53714 

Weli, the CB to fO plot th/ckensf The 
atove fetters are tut & few of the ptfe 
received at 73 this month. We need e 
band plan, f would fike to take Darryi 
up on hm st/ggestion, m}d gather mfor* 
mation from interested converts^ tf 
you h'ke, serid your comments to me 
end nt combine them with irj forma- 
tion on hand — let's get this thing 
going. Of course, OSCAR frequencies 
must be considered in any plan, as 
sewraf fetters indicate. / cart see that 
rm going to haim to fire up my aid 
DX-60 on 10 AM and see what is 
going on . . . maybe f won*t seff the 
goodie as previously planned! — JM. 




53 




KENWOOD TS-820S transceiver 

The NEW Kenwood TS-8205 features a factory installed digital 
frequency readout. • ISO thru 10 meter coverage • Integral IF 
shift • RF speech processor • VOX • Noise 
blanker • PLL • Built-in 25 KHz calibrator • CW side tone & 
semi-break-ln • IF OUT. RTTY. & XVTR • Phone patch IN and 
OUT terminals. 

1048.00 is list price, Call Toil-Free for quote. 



KENWOOD TR-7500 2m FM tra 

The NEW TR-7500 has the features you need! Check these: • PLL 
synthesized • 100 channels (88 pre-progranrrmed. 12 extra diode 
programmable) • Single knob channel selection • 2-DIGIT 
LED frequency display t Powered tone pad connec- 
tion • Helical resonators • 10 watts HI output. 1 watt LOW 
output. Available very soonf Call us for quote. 

299.00 list price. Call for quote. 




SEKSlill 



O o1^" 



.0 o fi 

t) o e 




^i^=^l^^^Ji 



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KENWOOD TS-600 
6m transceiver 

Fuil 4 MHz coverage * Modes: SSB. 
FM. CW, AM • Repeater ac- 
tivation • 11 fixed channels (crystals 
optional) • Built-in AC/DC oper- 
ation • Noise blanker • Amplified- 
type AGC circuit • Fully equipped RF 
w/dual-gate MOS FET* 

649,00 list pnce. Call for quote. 




oo 



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n -^"-tt 



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KENWOOD TS-S20S 
transceiver 

• 160 * 10 meter coverage • Optional 
DG-1 digital frequency display • New 
speech processor w/audio compres- 
sion amplifier • AC power supply (DC 
optional) • RF attenuator, front- pan el 
activated • Provisions for sep. receive 
antenna & phone patch. 

649,00 list price. Call for quote. 




KENWOOD 

TR-2200A 

2m FM transceiver 

Features: • Solid-state oonstruc- 
tjon • 2 watts HI. 0.4 watts LOW out- 
put • 12 fixed channels (6 
supplted) * y* wave telescoping 
antenna • Rechargeable Ni Cad 
batteries • Lfghted channel 
indicators • Hand-held microphone. 

229*95 list price. Call for quote. 



Remember, you can call TOLL-FREE: 1-800-633-3410 in U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 
Alabama for our low price quote. Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thru Friday. 



B4NKAMERICARQ 



tiwtttfht j4r*r 



Long s Elecrtronics 



L9 




MAIL ORDERS' P.O. BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM, AL 35202 * STREET ADDRESS; 3521 lOTH AVENUE NORTH BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 35234 



54 



•KENWOOD. DRAKE, ICOM. CDE. HYGAIN, CUSHCRAFT. NPC. TPL. TRISTAO. 
NEWTRONICS. REGENCY. ROHN, WILSON, TEN-TEC, B&W. DENTRON, & MFJ. 



,...*«".',•""% 






vA^^^ ^T atatw 



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am I fit iHtftA'f 



^C-lit tM*-^ 



YC-221 digltaJ display 

Features: • All cabfes and connectors 
for connection • 7-digit display 
(LED) • Calibration control on 
front • Sits easily on top of 
transceiver. 

1 1 9.00 list price. Call for quote. 



YAESU FT-221 R 2 meter 

transceiver with YC-221 
digital dispiay. . . 



714.00 



is list price for FT-221 R & YC-221 
Call for quote. 



The FT-221 R features: • Complete 144 to 148 MHz coverage in 8 
band segments • Built-in AC/DC power supplies • Modes: SSS, 
CW, FM, AM • Seiectabte±600 KHz repeater offset • Built-in 
VOX and break-in CW • External lone Input connector * Noise 
blanker • 11 crystal channels per band segment (86 total 
channels) • SSB output 12 watts PEP, FM/CWoutput 14 watts, AM 
output 2.5 watts • PLL circuitry. 

The YC-221 digital frequency display is designed for use with the 
FT-22t or FT-221 R. It displays the operating frequency in MHz» 
KHz and 100 Hz ranges in 7 digits (LED). 




YAESU FT-301D 
HF transceiver 

• All soNd-stat© • LED read- 
out • 160 - 10 meter coverage 

• Receive only: WWV/JJY & CB • 200 
W PEP: SSB, CW, and SO W on AM. 
FSK • Noise blanker • RF speech 
processor • VOX • Auto break-in on 
CW w/side tone • AGC 

935.00 list price. Call for quote. 




YAESU FT-101E 
transceiver 

• Solid-state •160-10 meter cov- 
erage • Built-in AC/DC power sup- 
plies • Built-in RF speech processor 

• 260 W PEP on SSB. 180 W on CW, 
80 W on AM • FVO * VOX • Auto 
break-In on CW w/side tone WWV/ 
JJY reception 

729.00 list pnce. Call for quote. 




1 



YAESU YC-500J 
frequency counter 

• fl-digit readout covers up to 500 
MHz • Dual range system • Frequen- 
cy range: Input 1 : 10 to 50 MHz, Input 
2 50 to 500 MHz • Accuracy: 10 PPM 

• Display: 6-digit LED* Display time: 
OJ or 2 seconds. 

249.00 list price. Call for quote. 



Remember, you can call TOLL-FREE: 1-800-633-3410 in U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 
Alabama for our lov\r price quote. Hours: 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday thru Friday. 



^/fv/r 



BANKAMERICAf^a 



Hf^/mf ^f^' 



Loiras Ele€:trQiik:s 



L9 



master charg* 



MAIL ORDERS: P.O. BOX T1347 BIRMINGHAM, AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS: 3521 10TH AVENUE NORTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 35234 



55 




ICOM IC-211 2m transceiver 

• 144 to 148 MHz coverage • Modes: SSB. CW, FM • LSI syn- 
Ihesizer PLL • 4-digil LED readout • Pulse-type noise blanker 

• VOX w/adjustable gain • SWR bridge • CW monitor 

• Automatic power control • AC/DC power supplies • Antenna 
impedance: 50 ohms unbaJanced • TX output: 10W PEP. 

749.00 is list price. Call Toil-Free for quote. 



ICOM IC-245 2m transceiver 

• LSI synthesizer PLL • 4HJigii LED readout • Transmit & receive 
frequencies are independently programable on any separation 

• Receiver front-end is a balance of low noise, high-gain MOS 
FET & 5 section filter • TX output: 10 W PEP • Frequency step 
size: 5 KHz for FM, 100 Hz (with adapter) or 5 KHz for SSB, 

499»00 is list price. Call ToD-Free for quote. 




ICOM IC-215 2m FM 
transceiver 

• 2 meter FM • 3 W PEP • 15 channels, 
12 by seiector, 3 by function switch 

• Dual power level, 3 W HI for long 
distance. 0.5 W LOW for local • Dial 
iUumination for night use • Power 
pilot lamp • Frequency range; 146 to 
148 MHz. 

229.00 list price. Call for quote. 



ICOM IC-22S FM 

transceiver 

* Frequency range: 146 to 148 MHz 

• Preset any 15 KHz channel in the 
frequency synthesizer by diode 
matrix board • Output: 10 W Hi. 1 W 
LOW • Excellent spurious attenua- 
tion • 22 channels. 

289.00 list pnce. Call for quote. 




ICOM IC-30A FM 
transceiver 

• 22 channels, 450 MHz • Modulation 
F3 • Power output: 1 W HI, 1 W LOW 

• TX band width: 15 KHz w 5 KHz 
deviation • Low intermodulation 
comes from a low noise MOS^FET RF 
amp, coupled with a 5-section filter. 

399.00 list price. Call for quote. 



Remember, you can call TOLL-FREE: 1-800-633-3410 in U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 

Alabama for our low price quote. Hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday, 



v<eri[;ahp 



LcMig s Elec:tronics 




Lt 1 - - 



MAIL ORDERS P O BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM. AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS: 3321 10TH AVENUE NORTH BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 35234 



€6 



*KENWOOD. YAESU, ICOM. CDE, HYGAIN. CUSHCRAFT. NPC, TPL, TRISTAO. 
NEWTRONICS. REGENCY. ROHN. WILSON, TEN-TEC. B&W. DENTRON, & MFJ. 



X 



.•••. 



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B --(S'- ^ 



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DRAKE TR-4CW transceiver 

• 80 thru 10 meters • 300 W PEP on SSB: 260 W on CW. AM • 500 
Hz CW fifter included • RIT • Wide range recetvmg AGC • Solid- 
state VFO • Stiifled-carrier CW • VOX or PTT • Output impedance 
is adjustabfe • CW semi-dreak-in • Audio output 3 watts 

• TransceJve or separate PTO, 

699.00 Is list price. Cad Toil-Free for quote. 



DRAKE L-4B Unear amplifier 

• Rate mput: 2000 watts PEP orr SSB, 1000 watts OC input power 
on CW. AM. RTTY • High-efficiency class B grounded grid circuit 

• Transmitting AGC* Broad-band tuned input* RF negative feed 
back • Directional watt meter • Solid-state power supply • Two 
taut-band suspension meters. 

895.00 is list price. Call TolJ-Free for quote. 




DRAKE W-4 directional 
RF watt meter 

• Covers 2 thru 30 MHz • 2000 watts 
continuous duty power capability 

• Line impedance: 50 OHM resistive 

• VSWR insertion: no more than 1.05: 
1 • Accuracy: ±5% of reading • 4- 
positfon switch on front selects 
desired scale, forward or reflected 
power. 

72«00 list price. Call for quote. 



.*>/ 

^.^//, 




DRAKE 1525 EM 
micro pii one 

• Auto-patch encoder and mike are a 
single unit, fully wired and ready to 
use • High accuracy IC tone 
generator, no frequency adjustments 

• Digitran* keyboard • Low output 
impedance, use with most 
transceivers. 

49.95 Call for shipping. 




DRAKE TR-33C 2m 
transceiver 

• 12 channel provision (2 supplied) 

• All FET front-end ci7Stal filter for 
superb intermod. rejection • Ni-Cad 
cells supplied • Builtnn charger 

• Low power drain circuit on 
squelched receive • Lighted dial 
when using external power. 

229,00 list price. Call for quote. 



Remember, you can call TOLL-FREE: 1-800-633-3410 in U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 

Alabama for our tow price quote. Hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday, 



BAMKANflRICAJiD 



Longs Elecrtronics 



LS 




MAIL ORDERS: P.O 0OX 11347 BIRMINGHAM. AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS: 3521 lOTH AVENUE NORTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 35234 



57 



Ml 



*KENWOOD, YAESU, ICOM, CDE, HYGAIN. CUSHCRAFT, NPC, TPL, TRISTAO, 
NEWTRONtCS, REGENCY, ROHN, WILSON. TEN-TEC, B&W, DRAKE, & MFJ. 



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DENTRON MLA-2500 linear amplifier 

• Contunuous duty power supply • t60 thru 10 meter coverage • 
2000 * watts PEP input on SSB • 1000 watts DC input on CW. 
RTTY. SSTV • Two external-anode ceramic/metal triodes 
operating in grounded grid • Covers MARS w/o modifi cations • 
50 ohm input/output impedance • Buitt-in RF watt meter, 

799.50 is list price. Call Toll-Free tor quote. 



DENTRON MT-3000A antenna tuner 

• 160 thru 10 meter coverage • Handles a full 3KW PEP • 
Continuous tuning i ,8 - 30 mc • BuiH-in dual watt meters* Built- 
in 50 ohm dummy load tor proper exciter adjustment • Antenna 
selector switch enables you to by-pass the tuner direct or select 
the dummy toad or 5 other antenna systems. 

349.50 is list price. Cal) Toll-Free for quote. 





DENTRON 160-lOAT 
super tuner 

Balanced Ji ne. coax cable, random, or 
long wire antennas, the 160-1 OAT will 
match it— 160 thru 10 meters • Con- 
tunuous tuning, 1.8-30 mc • 3 inputs 
• Handles 500 watts DC, 1000 watts 
PEP • Heavy duty, 2-core Balun {3W* 
dia, X 3'* H) • Tapped inductor #12 
ga. wire. 

129«50 list price. Call for quote. 



DENTRON Trim Tenna 
20 meter beam 

For the amateur who wants fantastic 
performance with good looks! » Front 
element: 16' driver with H-Q coils fed 
directly with 52 ohm coax • Reflector 
element: 1 7' with 1 5 dB F/B ratio • BV2 
turning radius • 4 dB forward gain 
over dipole • Elements 7 feet apart 
* Weight: 14 lbs. 

129i50 list price. Call for quote. 




DENTRON all band 
doublet antenna 

This all band doublet or inverted 
antenna covers 160 thru 10 meters. 
Has total length of 130 ft, of 14 ga. 
stranded copper wire. The doublet is 
tuned & center fed thru 100 ft. of 470 
ohm PVC covered transmission tine. 
Assembly is complete. 

24150 is Long's low price. 



Remember, you can call TOLL-FREE: 1-800-633-3410 in U.S,A, or call 1-800-292-8668 in 

Alabama for our low price quote. Hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday. 



Ban H 4m EH i CARD 



tiv//¥vm Am 



LcMio s Electronics 



L9 



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inuiter cKiirg*! 




1 -!■■ iBI ■)■■*«■ Ejt^ J 





MAIL ORDERS: P.O. BOX 11347 BIRMINGHAM. AL 35202 • STREET ADDRESS: 3521 10TH AVENUE NORTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 35234 



€8 




TEN-TEC Triton IV digital transceiver 

• Solid-state • Instant bank change • Covers 3.5 to 30 MHz • 200 
watts input on all bands • Receiver sensitivity: 0.3 micro V • S-pole 
crystaf IF filter • Large LED readout * Offset receiver tuning 

• WWVat 10&15MH2* Separate recefving capability • Full CW 
break-in • S-meter and SWR bridge. 

869.00 is fist price. Call Toll-Free for quote. 



TEN-TEC Century 21 CW transceiver 

• Full break-in • 70 watts input • Solid-state • Built-in speaker 

• Receive CW or SSB • Instant band change • Overload protec- 
tion • Offset receiver tuning • Sidetone w/adjustabfe levef 

• Regulated power supply • Full band coverage: 80 thru 20 
meters with crystals supplied. Other crystals available. 

289*00 IS fist price. Caff Toff-Free for quote. 




TEN'TEC KR-50 
electronic keyer 

• Speed range: 6-50 wpm • Weiphting 
ratio range: 50 to 1 50% of classical d it 
length • Output: reed relay, contact 
rating 15 VA. 400 V maK- • Sidetone: 
500 Hz tone • Dil& dah memories with 
defeat switches. 

110.00 list price. Calf for quote. 




TEN-TEC KR-20A 
electronic keyer 

• Keyed output: reed relay: 15 voit- 
amp. contacts^ 400 volts max • Speed 
range; 6 to 50 wpm • Time base: 
keyed to start with paddle actuation 

• Self-completing characters 

• Side-tone oscillator with ad- 
justable level. 

67.50 fist price. Call for quote. 




TEN-TEC 262G 
power supply 

• Input voltage: 117 VAC, 50-60 Hz 

• Output voftage 13.0 VDC 

• Regulation: Better than 1%. NL to 
PL @ 1 1 7 VAC • Output current: to 
18 amps • Sation speaker • VOX 
circuits • Over current protection. 

129.00 list price. Call for quote. 



Reinember, you can call TOLL-FREE: 1-800-633-3410 in U.S.A. or call 1-800-292-8668 in 

Alabama for our low price quote. Hours: 9:00 AM til 5:30 PM, Monday thru Friday. 



BAHKJUMERICARD 



m^mt A£if 



Longs Elec:troni<:s 



L9 




h/IAIL ORDERS: P O. BOX 11347 BIRfyllNGHAM. AL 36202 ■ STREET ADDRESS: 3521 10TH AVENUE NORTH BIRMINGHAM. ALABAMA 35234 



59 



Bob Walker KSUBM 
1608 E, Tucker Blvd. 
Arlington XX 76010 

Buiip Todd WB5WSG 
11456 Dumbarton Dr^ 
Dallas rx 75228 




Build 
ComCoder 



-- versatility for the IC-22S 



One of the most versatile 
two meter rigs on the 
market is the I com 22S PLL 
synthesized transceiver. With 
the addition of a device we 
call the ComCoder, all of the 
channels that can be pro- 
grammed into a 22S are avail- 
able at the flick of three 
direct reading BCD thumb- 
wheel switches- 
Even though several com- 
mercial and homemade 
devices have been developed 
to increase the programming 



capacity of the 22S| we feel 
that the ComCoder is one of 
the most practical because it 
is relatively inexpensive, is 
easy to construct using off- 
the-shelf components, and is 
small in size. Moreover, the 
original 22 positions can still 
be used, duplex and simplex 
functions are performed auto- 
matically, and the unit can 
provide a me^ns of remote 
operation. Perhaps the most 
significant feature is that any 
frequency in 15 kHz steps 



can be dialed in and read out 
directly on the switch numer- 
als. No codes, charts, or men- 
tal calculations are needed* 
The frequency range covered 
by the ComCoder on our 
radios is from 145340 to 
148.215 MHz, in 15 kHz 
steps. The range below 
146.00 MHz may vary from 
unit to unit. It should be 
noted that the range above 
148.00 MHz is out of the 
band and should not be used. 
Most owners of a 22S who 




have programmed the matrix 
board have probably noticed 
that the board has 23 posi- 
tions, not iust 22! The fore- 
sight of loom in providing the 
23rd position along with posi- 
tion 23 on the rotary channel 
selector switch (first dot past 
numeral 22) makes addition 
of the ComCoder or other 
systems a fairly simple task. 

Inside the radio, only one 
very minor modification is 
required. Add two diodes, 
one resistor, a 24-pin acces- 
sory socket, and a few wires, 
and your 22S is ready to 
accept the ComCoder. 

The following steps repre- 
sent the minimum operations 
required to make the 225 
ready to accept the Com- 
Coder, (We say "minimum** 
because optional connections 
such as audio in and output 
required to remote the entire 
rig will vary according to the 
indivi dual's desires.) 

1. Remove the standard 
9-pin accessory socket and 
replace it with a 24'pin acces- 
sory socket. Icom sells a 
24-pin socket complete with 
bracket that will fit wilJi no 
modifications to the rig. 
However, we used a molex 
#03*06-1241 female and 
#03-06-1241 male connector. 
The original bracket with a 
round hole for the 9-pin sock- 
et was carefully filed out into 
a rectangular shape to accept 
the 24-pin socket, 

2. Disconnect the blue dis- 
criminator meter wire from 
the 9-pin socket, and recoth 
nect it to pin 3 of the 24-pin 
socket. (See step 4,) 

3. Disconnect the ground 
wire from the 9-pin socket 
and the board. Reconnect a 
new ground wire of approxi- 
mately 20 AWG from the 
board to pin 4 of the 2+ pin 



M4KE tuT HEffE - 




Fig. h Bottom of matrix 
board 



60 





socket, (See step 4,) 

4. Disconnect the .01 uF 
capacitor from the 9-pin 
socket and reconnect it be- 
tween pin 3 and pin 4 of t^e 
24"pln socket, This should be 
done at the same time as 
steps 2 and 3. We actually 
used a new capacitor, because 
it W3S easier than removing 
the one from the 9-pin sock- 
et. 

5. On the bottom side of the 
matrix board, one strip of 
copper foil must be separated 
as shown in Fig, 1, and 
bridged with a diode. The 
cathode is placed toward the 
pin socket. A small triangular- 
ly shaped file works well for 
separating the copper. A 
diode of the same type used 
for programming the 22S 
{1 N914} should be used. Cut* 
ting the copper at this point 
is the only real modification 
required. 

6. On the top side of the 
matrix boards connect a 
diode to the second pin of 
the matrix board socket as 
shown in Fig. 2, This diode 
should be placed parallel with 



-[5J 






1 



the end of the board, with 
the cathode connected to the 
pin. The other end should be 
passed through an existing 
hole in the corner of the 
board and connected to a 
wire. This method of installa- 
tion stabilizes the diode and 
minimizes the possibility of 
the leads being broken during 
other operations. The wire 
from this diode is the DP line, 
and connects to pin 13 of the 
accessory socket. Use the 
same type of diode as was 
used in step 5. 

7. Connect a 330 Ohm H 
Watt resistor between the 
matrix board position 23 
common bar, as shown in Fig. 
3, and pin 1 6 of the accessory 
socket. The end of the resis- 
tor should be inserted 
through an existing hole in 
the corner of the PC board 
for stability. The wire from 
this resistor goes to pin 16 (+ 
9 V) of the accessory sockeL 

8, Connect a wire from the 



CdWiECt «inES TO ACC. 
SOCKET &i«S AS INOICATEXJ 



^ g a e a d 4 i 

it li. a Z4 '7 IB f zo 



^^ 




TTW t* 21 -s i * 1 

Df » B3 0« fl4 02 &* OCI 



TO Pm »A tec SOCKtT 

Fig, 2. Top of matrix board 



^TQ Pit% .6 ACe 50CICET t*flVl 



position 23 pad on the 
bottom of the matrix board, 
as shown in Fig. 4, to posi- 
tion 23 of the rotary channel 
selector switch, 

9. Install 8 wires from the 
matrix board channel 23 posi* 
tion locations 07 ^ D6, D5, 
04, D3, 02, Dl, and 00, as 
shown in Fig. 3. The wires 
should connect to the 24-pin 
accessory socket^ as shown in 
the accessory socket pin 
assignment (Fig. 5). 

10. Connect an 18*20 AWG 
wire from the top connector 
(one closest to the squelch 
control) of the high -off-low 
switch to pin 2 of the 24-p(n 
accessory socket This is the 
12 volt power wire, 

1 1 . Connect a wire from the 
push-to-talk wire to pin 5 of 
the accessory socket, as 
shown in Fig. 6. Connection 
is recommended at this point, 
to avoid disassembly of the 
front of the radio to get to 
the wire. 

Tlie wires connected to 



m^f. TO POSITIO*! *23' 0*1 *<jTftHT SWITCH 

I 



« * « 



* 



a 

[3 



t I 





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® 


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pin No. 

• \ 
2 
3 
4 
B 

• 6 

• 7 
8 

. g 

•10 

11 

12 

13 
*14 
•15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 



Assignrrrent 



n 



S"-meter 
+12 volts (switch) 
Discriminator 
Ground 
Push'tO'talk 
Audio input (MIC) 
Ground 

1 2 V Unswiich 
Audio output 



DP line 
Lock lamp 
Signal lamp 
+9 V Pos. 23 
D3 (Pos. 23) 
D2 (Pos. 23t 
Dl (Pos. 23) 
DO (Pos- 23) 
D7 (Pos. 23) 
D6 (Pos. 23) 
D& (Pos. 23t 
D4 (Pos. 23) 



'530 D RE535TOH 

Fig. 3. Top of matrix board 



Fig, 4. Bottom of matrix 
board. 



Fig. 5. Accessory socket pin 
assignments and connections. 
Note: Any pin configurations 
are acceptable, but it is 
recommended tfiat the above 
pins be standardized. 
^Optional connections re- 
quired only if you desire 
remote operation. 



©t 



the mairix board should be of 
sufficient length lo allow 
manipulation of the board. 
After completing the above 
steps^ the radio is ready to 
accept the ComCoder. 

Before you start construc- 
tion of the ComCoder, you 
probably will want to know 
how it works. Fig, 7 shows a 
block diagram of operation of 
the system. 

In order to understand 
how the ComCoder works, 
the programming require- 
ments of the 22 S need to be 



identified. The 22S uses an 
eight bit binary code to con- 
trol the phase locked loop 
(PLL). Normally this code is 
provided by the diodes in the 
transceiver and selected by 
the 23 position switch, A ten 
position binary coded deci- 
mal (BCD) thumbwheel 
switch produces a code that 
looks exactly like a binary 
until the number ten is to 
be encoded. A binary ten is 
1010. A BCD ten is 
0001,0000, Therefore, it 
would take two BCD switches 




ro PtN J OF 




SOLDER 



flOTARt 

SWITCH 



\ M4Ht 
HERE 



Fig. 6, PTT line connection procedure (located on the ixick 
side of the front panel). 



SWITCHES 



OUPLf it 
LOGIC 



V«0'^ 



NOPTMAL 



^ TO 2ZS 

DUPLEX LINE. 



-* H^Vtl^TED 



4 stAse 
BCD Down 

COUITTCR 



CONTROL 




HEXA£tECmAL 

UP COUNTER 



T 



T*C 

A- ajT 

LATCNES 




CO^iSTfthiT 



Fig. Z Block diagram. 



"^ ^^Tiz ^*'*^ ^"5 *?12 R9 

L»« n^ f f » T n T f f f f f f f T 



R34 






BCD I 




(XXX) 6666 

acD£ acD3 



^^f 



I 



flW 




SWITCH 



PTT 






Fig. 5. Suggested parts layout. 



lo produce a ten and three to 
produce a three digit number 
such as 694, 

The range of frequencies 
that the 22S can be coded for 
is from 00000000 {which cor- 
responds to a frequency of 
144390 MHz) to 11111111 
(which is a frequency of 
148.215 MHz). Even though 
the 22S could be coded for 
144.390 MHz, inherent char- 
acteristics of the 22S PLL 
will not let the unit lock up 
on frequencies in the upper 
144 and lower 145 MHz 
range. Note that only three 
thumbwheel switches are re- 
quired* The first two digits (1 
and 4) and the 5 showing a 
1 5 kHz are automatic. The 1 
and 4 numerals could be 
painted beside the thumb- 
wheel numerals if desired. 
The red LED lights to show a 
15 kHz split frequency. For 
instance, when (14) 743 is 
dialed in, the red LED will 
light, thus indicating a fre- 
quency of 147.435 MHz. 

The formula to convert a 
number such as (1 4) 6940 to 
the appropriate binary code is 
(69404390) ^15 =170, The 
170 corresponds to the 
binary code as shown in the 
IC-22S owner's manual pro- 
gramming chart This arith- 
metic formula required to 
convert a direct reading 
number (on the thumb- 
wheels) is solved by the Corn- 
Coder, Detailed operation of 
the ComCoder is as follows: 
1, The numbers on the three 
BCD switches are loaded into 
the three BCD counters* At 
the same timej a constant 
equal to -292(14390/15) is 
loaded into the binary count- 
ers, 

1. The osciftator counts 
down the BCD counter 
toward zero, while every 15th 
pulse of the oscillator counts 
up the binary counter* 
3. When the BCD counter 
reaches zero, 6940 pulses 
(assuming 1 4694 has been se- 
lected on the switches) have 
been issued and 462 pulses 
have been counted into the 
binary counter. The result of 
the -292 that was first loaded 
in and the 462 is 
462 - 292 = 170. A pulse is 



issued to load the latch with 
this value. 

4. The divide by 15 ts reset 
and the process is restarted. 
The components not 
mounted on the circuit board 
are as follows: capacitors C7 
and C5, 5 volt regulator 
LM309, light emitting diode 
(15 kHz offset indi- 
cator), BCD thumbwheel 
switches, DPST center off du- 
plex line switch, 1N2069 
diode CR13, and the 24-pin 
plug. The 24-pin plug could 
be option*il. The wiring could 
be made directly to the com- 
ponents and the circuit 
board. This is not desirable 
unless the unit is to operate 
in a permanent location. Any 
problems that show up after 
the unit is operational would 
probably be the result of a 
broken wire. Repair would be 
simplified by having the con- 
necting cable capable of being 
plugged into the radio and 
the ComCoder. Also, the use 
of cables of different lengths 
for operations such as remote 
setup in your car and fixed in 
the house is more practical. 

After you have scrounged 
or bou^t all of the parts, 

assembly is as follows: 
T Mount the components on 
the circuit board. Note that 
wiring is not critical and that 
alternate methods other than 
a printed circuit board could 
be used* However, in order to 
make the unit as small and 
neat as possible (as well as 
easy to assemble), a printed 
circuit board is recommended 
(as shown in the photograph 
of the inside of the Corn- 
Coder). 

2. Prepare the housing box 
to receive the BCD switches^ 
5 volt regulator, LED, DPST 
switch, and 24-pin socket- 
Layout is not critical, but 
should generally follow that 
as shown in the photographs. 
Drill holes for the regulator 
pins and mounting screws. 
The pin holes should be 
approximately % inch in di- 
ameter. Drill holes for LED 
snap mount and DPST 
switch. Drill starter holes for 
the BCD switches and 24-pin 
socket. A hand nibbler was 
used to complete the rectan- 



62 



gular holes for the BCD 
switches and 24-pin socket. If 
a nibbler is not availabie^ the 
hol«?s could be filled. Note 
that as shown in the photo- 
graphs, the switches and LED 
are over to one side. This will 
aliow the addition of a mike 
jack for remote operation. 
3. Mount components listed 
in step 2 in their appropriate 
location. Do not install per* 
manently at this time, be* 
cause some of the wiring con- 
nections are simplified with 
components not mounted. 
We used a power transistor 
socket to mount the 5 volt 
regulator. This made the task 
of connecting CI, C7, and the 
wiring easier. Silicone grease 
should be used in mounting 
the regulator^ to insure good 
heat conductivity. Aiso, if 
your box is painted, you 
should scrape the paint 
beneath the regulator. 



4. Install wiring from the 

BCD switches to the circuit 
board. We mounted diode 
CR13 directly to the BCD 
switch connection points. 
The connection points are 
shown on the parts layout 
drawing (Fig. 8). 

5. Install wiring from the PC 
board, regulator, and DPST 
switch to the 24'pin socket. 

6. Connect the LED to the 
PC board. We used a snap 
mount type LED, but almost 
any type can be used, 

7. Mount the PC board inside 
the housing. Make sure it is 
well insulated and makes no 
contact with the box or any 
other components (see test 
procedures). 

8. Mount all other compo- 
nents permanently (see test 
procedures). 

After completing the 
above steps, the unit should 
be ready to operate. How- 



ever, before you connect the 
ComCoder to your radio, the 
following tests are recom- 
mended: 

1 . Measure the resistance 
from ground to +1 2 V dc and 
from ground to +5 V dc, to 
insure there is not a short. 

2. Connect +12 V dc and 
ground to the unit. Measure 
+5 V dc. Connect PCB to 5 V 
dc. The 5 V dc should draw a 
current of approximately 500 
mA. 

3. If you have an oscifto* 
scope, insure that the clock is 
running (555^ pin 3). 

4. Measure the collector of 
Q2, The voltage should be 
less than one volL 

5- Connect 5 V dc to R34, 
+9 V input to PCB. The 
collector of Q2 line should go 
to+12Vdc. 

6. Select a 15 kHz fre- 
quency* The LED should 
come on. 



7. Select 14439 and measure 
each of the code lines. They 
should all be less than one 
volt. 

8. Select 144.37. The code 
lines should all measure 12 
volts. 

9. Connect a tOk Ohm resis- 
tor from your meter probe to 
ground and measure each of 
the code lines. They should 
be (ess than 9.5 volts and 
greater than 7,5 volts. 

10. Set duplex switch on 
normal- Select 14634, Center 
of duplex switch should 
measure approximately 5 V 
dc. 

11. Ground PTT line voltage 
should go to less than one 
volt. 

12. Switch to invert* Voltage 
should go to 9 V dc* Un- 
g round PTT line voltage 
should be less than 1 volt. 

1 3. Select a frequency of 
146.52. The duplex line 






POSIT I QH 
23 OH 

tllCDE 
&OARQ 




iZVDC 
{Pin Zi 
FROM S2S 
SWiTCH 



<{*hN 4J 



INIDICATIIWI 
or 1Ufi3 



Fig, 9. Logic diagram. Ail resistors !4 W. *Noie: Diodes must t?e put in DUP line. 



63 



should measure less than one 
volt in all positions of the 
duplex switch, with the PTT 
grounded or ungrounded, 

14. Select 147.00; voltage 
should be the opposite of 
step 10, -12. (Disconnect 5 V 
dc from R34,) 

15. You are now ready to 
connect the Com Coder to 
your IC-22S. Caution! Re- 
move power if there are any 
abnormal sounds or smells, or 
if lamps dim. 

After everything has 
checked out, undertake the 
following operating pro- 
cedures: 

1 . Connect the ComCoder to 
the radio via the 24-pin cable 
assembly. 

2. Place the radio duplex 
switch in the simplex mode, 

3. Place the ComCoder 
switch in the normal position. 

4. Place the rotary switch on 
the radio in position 23 (the 
first dot past position 22), 

5- Dial in the desired fre- 
quency on the ComCoder. 
6. Turn the power switch on 
and start working! 

Operation In Normal Position 

Dialing in a frequency 
such as 146.280 with the 
ComCoder function switch in 
the normal position will cause 
the system to transmit on 
146.280 MHz and receive on 
146.880 MHz. 

With the function switch 
still in the normal position, a 
frequency of 147.180 MHz 
will cause the system to trans- 
mit on 147.780 MH^ and 
receive on 147.180 MHz, 

With the function switch 
still in the normal position, 
a selling of 146.520 would 
cause the system to transmit 
on 146.520 and receive on 
146.520. 

What all of this means is 
the frequencies as follows are 
automatically simplexed: 
145-400 to 145,995, 146.400 

to 146-985, and 147.405 to 
147.990. All others are auto- 
matically duplexed either up 
or down. 

Operation In Simplex 
Position 

Any frequency selected re- 
ceives and transmits on that 



frequency. 

Operation In Inverted 

Position 

Normal duplex operations 
are reversed. For instance, 
dialing in 146.280 will cause 
ihe system to receive on 
146,280 and transmit on 
146.880. This mode of opera- 
tion would be extremely use- 
ful for direct communication 
with other crystal controlled 
stations in the event of the 
repeater going down* 

The optional connection 
shown on the schematic dia- 
gram at pin 2 of Z1 2 provides 
for automatic inversion of the 
15 kHz split repeater inputs. 
This allows 15 kHz repeater 



operation with the function 
switch in the normal position. 

Generally, all normal oper- 
ations can be performed with 
the function switch in the 
normal position. The simplex 
and inverted positions are 
icing on the cake that let you 
do almost anything. 

Wc hope you have as much 
fun building and using the 
ComCoder as we have. We 
would like to give credit to 
Gary Todd WB5LIF of Todd 
Photographies in Sulphur 
SpringSi Texas, for his assis- 
tance and efforts in providing 
the photographs used in this 
article. 

A kit including all elec- 



tronic components and a 
double-sided printed circuit 
board with plated-through 
holes is available from Bullet 
Electronics, PC Box 19442, 
Dallas TX 75219, for 
$39.95. The kit conuins all 
items required to build a 
ComCoder except the hard- 
ware, box, and switches. For 
those wanting to scrounge 
their own parts, a double- 
sided printed circuit board 
with plated'th rough holes is 
available for $10*50 from 
Bob Walker, 1608 East 
Tucker, Arlington TX 76010, 
On both of the above, add 5% 
for postage and handling. 
Texas residents should add 
5% sales tax, ■ 



PARTS LIST 



Raference 


PC Board 




Designaior 


Descrtptioni 


Value or Type 


Q1,Q3,Q4 


NPN transistor, silicon, GP 


2N706 


Q2 


PNP transistor, silicon, GP 


2N2905 


Z1,77, Z3,Z4 


IC up/down decrSde court tef 


74192 


25, Z9 


ICquad tatch open collector 


MC4035 


Z6, Z10,Z11 


IC up/down binary counter 


74193 


Z7 


JC quad 2 input NAND gate 


7400 


zs 


IC timer 


555 


212 


IC quad exclusive or, CMOS 


4030 


R1-R12,R3S 


Resistor, % Watt 


470 Ohm 


R13,R14, R37 


Resistor, y4 Watt 


2.2k Ohm 


R16 


Resistor, V* Watt 


2.7k Ohm 


R15.R17^R22 


Resistor, y* Watt 


5,1k Ohm 


R23. R25, R26. R36 


Resistor, % Watt 


Ik Ohm 


R24,R29-R32,R34 


Resistor, % Watt 


1 Ok Ohm 


R27, R2S 


Resistor, % Watt 


100 Ohm 


R33 


Resistor, Vi Watt 


4.7k Ohm 


CR1-CR8, CR11,CR12, 






CR14 


Silicon diode, GP 


1lSr9t4 


CR9, CR10 


Germanium diode, GP 


IN 270 


C2 


Capacitor, ceramic 


.001 uF 


C3 


Capacitor, aluminum 


lOuP 


C4, C6, ca 


Capacitor, ceramic 


m uF 


C5 


Capacitor, ceramic 


220 pF 


Z13 


3 terminal voltage regulator 


LM309 


CR13 


Diode, silicon, 750 mA 


1 N2069 


CI 


Capacitor 


4,7 uF 


C7 


Capacctor 


40 gF 


CR15 


LED 


Any type 


SI 


SPOT with off switch 


Any type 


BCD 1 -BCD 3 


10 position BCD coded thumb* 
wheel switches with zero position 
open to all contacts 


Any type 


K1 


Socket for LM309 




P1,P2 


Molex pfu9, 24-pjn 


P03 -06-22 41 




Pins for above 


02-06-2103 


Jl 


tVlole>c socket, 24-pin 


R 03 -06-1241 




Sockets for above 


02-06-1103 




Wife 





CR1,CR2 

R1 

J2 



INSrOE RADIO PARTS 

Silicon diode. GP 
Re$($tor/A Watt 
Motex socket^ 24-pin 
Sockets for above 
Wire 



1N914 
330 Ohm 
R03^36 1241 
02 06 1103 

24 AWG stranded, 
any type 



64 




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dWVlS ind 



zzoet" iw doauvH nojlnhb 

ANVdWOO H1V3H 





a 



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Additionally, the ''add 5 kHz" function is ac- 
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True FM 

Careful attention to the transmitter audio cir- 
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audio quality, A Schmitt-trigger squelch circuit 
with a threshold 0.3 /*V or less provides positive, 



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Name 



Address. 
City 



AM-343 



.Stele. 
Zip. 



Attache Case 

Portable 



-- Bond would like it! 



Albert H. Coya N4ALmB4SCN 
17lOSW85rd Ct. 
Miami FL 33155 




James Bond and his 
counterspy gadgetry 
made the attdche case 
notorious a decade or so ago. 
The black vinyl rectangle be^ 
came a symbol of the super- 
secret agenL Bond was able 
to produce weapons and com- 
munications devices from his 
case with the ease of a 
magician pulling rabbits from 
his velvet hat. 

Usually, the attache case 
contained a rapid fire 7 mm 
machine gun, smoke 
grenades, plastic explosives, a 
telescopic blowgun with a 
provision for darts im- 
pregnated in curare, a bottle 
of champagne and two 
glasses, and, of course, a two- 
way radio. With this radio 
(frequency unknown) and an 
invisible antenna, he always 
kept in touch with head- 
quarters in London, even 
while traveling aboard a 
dromedary in the Gobi 
Desert. 

Unfortunately, or fortu- 
nately, I don*t have a license 
to kill, and my attache case 
must be as legal as possible. 
So I will leave out the ex- 
plosives, poisoned darts, etc., 
and will stick to the com- 
munications business. My 



attache case portable may 
lack all those lethal weapons, 
but it contains an efficient 
and down-to-earth communi- 
cations system. 

As a staff photographer 
with the Miami Herald^ I 
travel throughout the United 
States and abroad. On short 
trips 1 drive, but most of the 
time I fty. The long hours in a 
motel waiting for a news- 
break can be shortened if I do 
some hamming. But 1 needed 
to have a compact and port- 
able operation. 

I contemplated the need 
for two possible modes of 
communication — from a 
hotel or motel room and 
from a rented car. To attach 
the rig to the car, I built a 
telescopic center -loaded 
antenna with a gutter clip. To 
feed the 1 2 volts from the car 
battery, I used a long, 
stranded wire, twelve gauge, 
coded for polarity, and with 
heavy-duty battery clips on 
the end. 

The motel operation is a 
lot simpler. Just be sure to 
get a room on the top floor. 
Open one of the back 
windows, and drop a long, 
covered wire down to ten to 
twelve feet above the ground 
level. Attach the end of the 
wre to the trans match, tune 
the wire to the band of your 
choice, and you will be 
talking to the boys back 
home in no time at all. 

In case you can't get a 
room at the top or it is 
difficult to drop a wire, the 
gutter antenna can be clipped 
to a pipe, the windowsill, 
etc., and, with the proper 
band tank coil, you'll go air- 
borne. 

For the attache' case opera- 
tion I chose the Atlas 21 OX, 
because of its small size and 
light weight. 1 also have an ac 
power supply and a long wire 
tuner, compact enough to fit 
in my case, and coax, wire, 
pliers, screwdrivers, etc. 

Lately [ added to this a gel 
battery, capable of seven 
Ampere-hours at 12 volts. I 
use this battery on camping 
trips and picnics. I have my 
own private field days and 
talk to a lot of guys while the 



m 



steaks char in the barbecue 
pit. 

On these trips l toss a 
long, covered wire over the 
trees and connect the end to 
the transmatch. On forty 
meters, stations from aJI over 
Florida start popping up. 
Everybody is interested in my 
portable operation. The fun 
starts when they pile up. 

The seven Ampere-hour 
gel battery is compact enough 
to fit into the attache case 
and strong enough for a full 
morning of rewarding QSOs. 

One weekend I took the 
XYL and my attache case to 
Cape Florida State Park, on 
the south tip of Key Biscayne 
across the bay from Miami, 
After biking and swimming, 
we took our things to a picnic 
table. While the XYL was 
preparing the food, I tossed a 
long wire over the pine trees 
and connected it to the trans- 
match. It is a very simple one 
that was advertised in 75 and 
sells for less than thirty 
dollars. Inside the little green 
box, you will find a toroid 
coil attached to a ten-position 
switch and a variable capac- 
itor. Be careful when tuning 
this toy, because the rf jump 
can bite your fingers! A neon 
bulb tells you when the maxi- 
mum output is obtained. 

After installing the gel 
battery and mike^ I started 
tuning the twenty meter 
band. It was buzzing like a 
beehive. At 12:20 pm Miami 
timej I got my first contact — 
Hank W3DX in Rockville, 
Maryland, Hank gave a good 
report, but he had a sk^ and 
had to OSY, 




My next contact was a 
maritime mobile in the 
Pacific Ocean near Central 
America- He was calling a W7 
station, so our OSO was 
short- 

At 12:50 pm, TG9TG, a 
Guatemalan station manned 
by Glen^ gave me a 5 by 6 
report Then I tried the forty 
meter band. Wayne W4JMU 
was near Jacksonville, 
Florida. The report was very 
good. In the low section of 
the forty meter band, a group 
of Cuban stations were 
talking to each other. I called 
C02RS in Camaguey, and 
Rjcardo answered my calL We 



got a nice report from the 
group, which included one 
ham working with an AM rig. 

Then I switched to the 15 
meter band, WA6SKI was on 
21.350 MHz in Riverside near 
Los Angeles. I explained to 
him that I was having a 
private field day in Cape 
Florida. His signal was a solid 
S9, and he gave me a nice 
report. 

Then the excitement 
started, when I asked Ray to 
phone patch my daughter, 
Susan, who lives in LA with 
her husband and my only 
granddaughter, Jenny. It was 
like a direct pipeline with the 



West Coast. My XYL had a 
great time talking with Susan, 
My daughter couldn't believe 
that we were sitting there on 
a picnic table facing the Gulf 
Stream, In the past, we had 
spent many hours together in 
the same spot, when she was 
in high school. 

It was a tremendously 
satisfying and exciting ex- 
perience, thanks to the kind- 
ness of Ray WA6SKL 1 forgot 
to ask for his QTH to send 
him my QSL, but, Ray, if 
you are reading this story, I 
hope you have a smile and 
remember this interesting 
afternoon. ■ 



N2W Products 



from page 25 

For inquiries coocernitng domestic 
USA sales of the new series of Bmrn- 
teur equlpmern from Hatlicrafters, 
contact The Hafticrafiers Company^ 
250 1 Arkans^ Lar^, Grand Pr^irte 
TX 75051, telephone 214^647-9090, 
telew number 73-2310. Inquiries from 
Other cour>tries will he handled by 
Hallicrafters jnternatjonai. Inc., at the 
same Texas address. 

FfLTER DESIGN MADE EASY 
Atiim Net)A/t>rk Design by Daude 



S. Lindquist is a new 749-page book 
which describes filter design and appli- 
cations, It is an invaluable reference 
for engineers, technicians, and hob- 
byists who musi uEKler^and signal 
processing and f i Iter ing, and who myst 
specify, design, ot adapt filters for 
their own Ltse& A.B. Williams of 
Coherent Com mynicat ions Systems 
says, "it is the. most impressive text- 
book on fillers I have ever come 

across." 

The book features standard design 

curves and tables, practical design 

examples, numerous problems with 



selected problem solutions, extensive 
referenceSt original and un published 
research results, and complete cross- 
referenced index including applica- 
tions. 



The prfce is $21.95 prepaid [$33.27 
for Calffomta order s> or add $T.50 
po^age and handling for 30 day 
billing. Steward & Sons, P.O. Box 
15232. Long Be^ch CA 90875. 



Corrections 



in refererKie CO "More Channels for 
the IC-2ZS;* June. 73, I would like to 
point out that the address of Bryant 
Electronics was in error on my part, 
Bryant Electronics is alive and v*/e|L 
To all those people sNho wrote for the 
board s» and the response was over- 
wfielmin^ please write to me if you 



wish the board. To those who received 
theirs late due to having to have 
another batch made, accept my 
apologies. You should have them by 
now. 

Bill Richarz WA4VAF 
4124Colebrook Rd. 
Charlotte fOC 28215 



67 



John Crawford WA4BAM 

Box 369 

BerrymUe VA 22611 




Build 

Beeper Alarm 



-- if staying in touch is important 



Since the adveni of my 
ariicle, *The Ultimate 
Alarm W {73 Magazine^ June, 

1973), there has been much 
interest in the feature which 
transmits a tone to a handie- 
talkie worn on the belt. This 
lets me know if the alarm is 
sounding while I am in a 
location where I can't hear 
the automobile horns. More- 
over, people are impressed 
that I caught a thief in the act 
of tampering with my car 



even though he thought he 
wasn 't setting anything off by 
climbing through a window. 
The vehicle described in the 
above article was broken into 
a total of 24 times by genuine 
thieves and, no doubt due to 
the article^ ^'tested*' numer- 
ousl other limes by enter- 
prising individuals at 
hamfests. One such person 
jumped violently up and 
down on the bumper at an 
ARRL convention^ thus 



destroying .94 talk-in 
facilities and making me 
immediately unpopular with 
several groups. 

Another problem mani- 
festing itself p and somewhat 
harder to rectify, was the fact 
that whenever I was in a 
theater, during the quietest 
and most suspenseful part of 
the picture, my handie-talkie 
invariably picked up other 
hams who would choose this 



time to vent their feelings on 
the traffic, the world sit- 
uation, or other nonsense, at 
full volume and probably 
directly in front of said 
theater. This invariaWy did 
not sft well with my nearest 
neighbors or the manage- 
ment, and once J at a posh 
symphony concert, with the 
conductor himself. Usually I 
ended up by turning the 
receiver off, thus voiding the 
whole point of the thing. 

The HT-220 handie-talkie 
was bulky, heavy, stretched 
my pockets on my jacket, 
and made me look like a 
plainclothes detective. Some- 
thing had to be changed, 

I then noted that at thin^ 
like concerts or public 
meetings, no one got par- 
ticularly upset when a bona 
fide physician's beeper went 
off. Here was an Important 
Person, clearly not a Xerox 
repairman, and armed with 
his beeper and a deprecating 
smile, he usually made his 
way to an exit with people 
nodding their approval and 
falling over one another to 
give him room. 

It became obvious that 
there seenr^ed to be a differ- 
ence between physicians and 
hams. 

Recently, feeling some- 
what affluent, I purchased a 
new car and a Motorola 
Pageboy II (used) with no 
real idea of what 1 was going 
to do with either one, I was, 







I 




The completed PC board. 



Another view of PC board. The two sockets are for the reeds. 
The two reed oscillators and the alert (ID) tone oscillator are 
the portion shown. Above these is the switching and sensor 
circuitry for the main alarm. Below are the ICs for the logic 
section. 



68 




Fig. J, Radio paging alarm circuit board schematic 



however, determined that 
anybody who scratched my 
new car while trying to break 
in would be dealt with severe- 
ly. My old car had wear 
marks all around the various 



openings from all the 
attempts made on it. When I 
sold it, it was depreciated 
accordingly (should have 
been cieaned and burned). I, 
therefore, completely re- 



designed the alarm system 
from the collection of several 
dirty miniboxes full of elec- 
tromechanical retays to a new 
integrated unit replete with 
transmitter, control board, 



test switches, and all the 

conceivable input/output 
combinations I would need* 
The new unit provides the 
appropriate control to 
energize a 100 Wall elec- 



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F/^. 2, Alarm switching and control for radio paging alarm. 



tronic siren, ihe vehicle 
horns, and a 1 Watt trans- 
milter. II umpcrrng occurs, 
such as a car backing into it 
or someone attempting to 
climb inside, jack it up, steal 
an antenna, etc, a "silent" 
alarm is activated. This con- 
sists of motion sensors which 
activate a two-tone page and 
identificalion signal and a 
transmitter. The pager 
receiver is tuned to the same 
frequency and, with an off- 
on-off'On tone, indicates the 
car is probably being, or is 
about to be, modi tied in ont 
way or another. Other sensors 
lie in wait and trigger another 
input if overt action is taken, 
such as the hood or doors 
being opened* The horns and 
siren then sounds ihe trans- 
milter comes on, and a steady 
rather than pulsed tone is 
heard in the receiver. 

The sensors are of many 
different types and are 
located throu^oui the entire 
car. Motion sensors in the 
front and rear detect motion 
of any sort and may be 



adjusted for various wind 
pressures and motion levels. 
Switches in the hood, doors, 
rear tailgate and crank up 
window (this is a Chevrolet 
carry-all) detect the opening 
of any of these. Vibration 
sensors on key parts of the 
auto are activated in case a 
window is hit or broken and 
an ultrasonic alarm sender- 
receiver unit is employed in 
the rear cargo area in certain 
instances. FtnallVi switch 
mats are used under portions 
of the carpeting. Should the 
main battery cable be cut 
from underneath (no easy 
feat) in an attempt to defeat 
the system, another battery 
used for the transmitter will 
sound the paging alarm 
anyway. 

The circuit is laid out on a 
single PC board containing 
the counters, two-tone page 
oscillators, ID oscillator, and 
basic alarm switching circuit. 
Auxiliary circuits are also 
included for other functions 
to be described. 

The transmitter is a 1 Watt 




Top yiew of alarm box showing parts placemen L Top — logic 
board. Middle — battery compartment with VW relay Instaffed, 
Bottom - fmes oi^r transmitter compartment. Note 5ut>' 
chassis bent to fit in box. 



transistorized unit from aGE 
Voice Commander II portable 
unit. I see these at hamfcsts 
for about $15.00 quite a btL 
The transmitters may be 
easily removed, leaving only 
the receiver board audio 
circuits and case, which may 
then be sold to firemen, 
CBerSj or monitor buffs for 
$30.CND. The transmitters have 
a positive ground arrange- 
ment, so an auxiliary 15 volt 
b.utery, rechargeable and 
capable of 500 mAh or so, is 
used. This aJso drives the 
counter and tone circuitry to 
preserve integrity if the main 
vehicle battery lead is cu I. 

The antenna is mounted 
inside a rear window and 
consists of the solid inner 
lead of a piece of RG-59 
stripped back about 1 9 Inches 
or so for lowest swr (more on 
this). Mounted in this 
mannerj it is almost invisible. 

Before describing the 
circuit operation^ it would be 
best to have an understanding 



of how a paging receiver 
works. There are basically 
two types: tone only, and 
tone-and-voice. In either case, 
a receiver is tuned to an 
operating frequency and will 
receive all signals transmitted 
over this frequency. If two 
sequential audio tones of the 
proper frequency are trans- 
mitted, the pager will emit a 
beeping tone which stays on 
for most of the duration of 
the second page tone. If a 
tone-and- voice pager is used, 
the speaker is then turned on 
and whatever audio is then 
transmitted will be heard. 

My pager is a tone-and- 
voice Motorola Pageboy II 
with an ''extra loud housing." 
The housing is a tuned cavity 
boosting the apparent audio 
output. Even with the larger 
dimensions, it is slightly 
smaller than a pack of 
cigarettes and fits nicely into 
a shirt pocket or on the belt 

There are several types 
available from several sources. 
A brand new Pageboy 11 from 
Motorola costs about 
$400.00. A used one may be 
procured for as low as $75*00 
and a new charger for $20.00- 
Meshna advertised older low 
band units for $30.00. Other 
types are available from 
several sources, including 
hamfests or other surplus 
dealers. Ideally, you will want 
a tone-and'voice pager 








-hU tH 



1 




f' 



Alarm box without battery showing front panel controls and 
plugs. 



70 



utilizing A standard two^one 
paging signal, TcMie only units 
will suffice, but with my 
circuit I you won^t be able to 
use the i den lifi cation feature 
for break-in or tamper. 

The atarm circuit is shown 
in Figs. 1 and 2. li the car is 
rocked or the molion sensors 
are otherwise put into 
motion, the tamper input 
relays a pulsed ground 
(remember we are using a 
positive 15 volt vehicle 
ground) to the base of 02 
through K3. C5 smooths this 
voltage and, with R9, pro- 
vides a short delay to keep 
Q2 turned on. Relay K2 is 
energined and provides power 
to the transmitter and logic 
circuits. With regulated 6.8 
volts and T2 volts now avail- 
able, the CMOS clock pro- 
vides a square wave to U2 at a 
rate determined by pot Rl 
and CI, the rate being adjust- 
able by the pot. 

At the same time^ R4 and 
C2 provide an initia) reset on 
U2 so that it starts counting 
from zero to insure the page 
tones get sent first, with the 
identification tone following- 

U2 counts each clock 
pulse, providing a binary 
count to 16 to the decimal 
decoders U3 and U4j wired to 
provide 16 sequential logic 
ones at their outputs. These 
are used to turn on Q3, 04, 
and 05 in turn through diode 
coding. Q5 is clocked by 04, 
which turns on and off with 
clock Ul if the tamper input 
is enabled. When 03> 04, and 
05 turn on, their collectors 



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go loWp thus enabling the 
tone oscillator outputs in 
turn. Q3 is on for one count 
and Q4 for 3 counts. These 
are the paging tone drivers, 
and I if the clock is made to 
run at an approximate 1 
second rate, the required 
"on" time of the two tones 
will be automaticatly ob- 
served because of the diode 
coding. A pager requires the 
1st tone be one second long 
and the 2nd tone three 
seconds, Q5 may be pulsed or 
steadily on, depending on 
whether the tamper or alarm 
inputs are enabled The 
former is obtained by gating 
OS and 06 with the clock so 
that a half second tone is 
generated. In the latter case, 
Q6 is turned on independent- 




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Side views of alarm showing transmitter board instafied. 



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Fig. i Main wiring, 

ly by the "alarm*- input, 
providing a continuous path 
for the emitter of Q5. In this 
way, a continuous identifi- 
cation tone is generated after 
the fourth count. 

The tone encoder circuitry 
incorporates two reed 
oscillators and amplifiers for 
the page tones and one twin 
T oscillator for the identifi- 
cation lone. The output 
amplitude of each is fully 
adjustablii for proper 
insertion to the transmitter. 
For reasons of frequency 
stability, reed encoders were 
used. These are able to with- 
stand the wide temperature 



extremes found in auto- 
mobiles without drifting off 
frequency. The basic design 
was from one encoder board, 
socket, and reed purchased 
from Communications Spe* 
cialists, Box 153, Brea, 
California, and adapted for 
this use. 

Since most pagers may 
come with reeds installed, it 
will be cheaper to match 
these reed frequencies to 
your encoder rather than buy 
new sets. From name plate 
information on the pager or 
the reeds themselves, you can 
determine the frequencies 
and order the proper reeds 




The completed alarm with Ixittery instaHed. Note battery plug 
and method of mounting control board. 



71 



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Ffg. 4, interface wiring^ alarm to automobUe. fc) Tamper set 
wiring, (d) Status hmp wiring, (e) Keyswitcb wiring (oper- 
ational), (f) Push switch set /reset wiring, (g) Radio page 
feature. 



and sockets. Communicaiiom 
Specialists can supply either 
reeds sockets^ or complcle 
encoders- If you don't have 
the reeds installed in the 
pager, choose any two tones 
you want or specify you want 
popular reeds, so that you 
can get new ones in the 
future at hamfests or surplus. 
Another circuit centered 
around Q16 allows the 



tamper sensors to settle down 
after the car has been driven. 
Essentially, this circuit dis- 
connects the motion sensors 
until they have stopped 
moving to prevent your pager 
from going wild every time 
you park your car. If 08, the 
SCR, is turned on while the 
motion sensors are moving, 
07 will conduct through K3, 
an NC SPST relay in series 



with the motion sensors- 
Capacitor C32 smoothes the 

pulses from the motion 
detectors and keeps Q7 
turned on until the motion 
has initially stopped. Q7 then 
turns off, and since there is 
no longer a load on the SCR, 
it no longer conducts. With 
relay coil K3 no longer 
energized, any further motion 
now made by the car will not 
turn Q16 on and will enable 
the tamper alarm circuitry, 

The A input is connected 
to the output of relay K4 of 
the alarm circuitry (Fig. 2). 
When this input is grounded 
to the vehicle frame, current 
flows through D22 and R9 to 
turn Q2 and K2 on. At the 
same time, current flows 
through R14 and D21 to Q6, 
keeping it on so that the 
idcniification tone will be 
steady rather than pulsing. 

The vehicle alarm circuit is 
triggered only when sensors 
described above are triggered 
(door switches, mats, 
vibration sensors, etc.). This 
circuit is shown in Fig. 2, 
When the input marked 
"key" is at +12 volts, Q17 is 
biased on and grounds the 
R65-D31 combination which 
is essentially the base of Ql 9. 
If 017 is turned off by 
grounding the sensor input 
momentarily, the collector 
goes high. QtS turns on and 
C34 is charged through R65 
and 031. With 017's 
collector low again, current 
flows from C34 into the base 
of Q19^ keeping it on for the 



length of time determined by 
R67 and R68. D31 prevents 
C34 from discharging back to 
ground through the now 
"on" 01 7. 

As C34 becomes dis- 
charged, 018 turns off and 
K4 opens. Since C34 holds a 
residual charge and will there- 
fore exhibit different time 
periods if a sensor is again 
triggered, R69 keeps C34 
discharged through K4 while 
the alarm is off, thereby pro- 
viding instant reset to what- 
ever time delay has been set 
(2-3 min.). 

K4 provides +12 volt and 
vehicle ground switching. 
This is a 4PDT relay rated at 
10 Amps. Two sets of con- 
tacts are brought out to 
connectors to provide +12 
volts directly to a Federal 
electronic siren, and two 
discrete switched grounds are 
available for the horn relay 
and the A input to the paging 
alarm. 

Since it was desirable to 
have easy set/reset capability, 
a mechanical latching relay is 
used to arm the system. A 
push-button sets or resets the 
alarm and^ with no physical 
switch position to tell if it is 
set or not, an indicator li^t 
is included. When the **key" 
input is connected through 
the latching relay to +12 
volts, R61 turns on 020. 
Initially Q19 is biased on by 
R60 and passes current to a 
bulb, keeping it lit. With 020 
on, however, 019 is turned 
off and the light goes out. 




i 




The completed system installed under rear puff -up seat in car^ 



Alarm system installed in car^ with cover off. 



72 



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F/i?. 5. Connector wiring. Connector as viewed from outside 
chassis; colors shown in interior wiring. Vehicle wiring color 
code: green — tamper set: yef/ow — tamper sensor; blue — 
sensor; violet — push-button set; white/violet — horn relay; 
white — headlight relay; black — Indicator bulb; orange 
{teflon}— RCC phone. 



indicating the alarm is set. 
One other circuit is on the 

board and is a specialized 
circuit for my own use. With 
an RCC phone in the car, it 
has become desirable to have 
some form of paging occur if 
someone calls. Since the 
equipment was present^ it 
seemed easy enough to add a 
simple circuit to have the 
alarm call the paging receiver, 
When an RCC operator 
decodes me, a decoder in the 
RCC radio provides a relay 
closure to ground. The 
output of this is tied to 
isolating relay Kl, an SPST 
relay. This grounds K2, 
turning on the system and the 
regular page tones are sent. 
As explained before, the 
second page tone sets off the 
pager receiver's alert tone^ 
which stays on as long as the 



second tone is transmilted- 
However, with 01 '^ emitter 
grounded by Kl, when the 
base goes high, the collector 
inhibits the clock input to U2 
so that the second page tone 
win slay on as long as the 
operator pages me, thereby 
triggering a continuous alert 
tone En the pager. 

This portion of the circuit 
is useful if you have RCC or 
ham decoders, such as touch- 
tone or PL, which are acti- 
vated when someone calls 
you. 

We thus have three modes 
of operation for the paging 
alarm, identifiable by means 
of the types of tones out of 
the pager: 

1 . A pulsed tone after the 
alert — Someone is either 
tampering with the car or an 
object has hit it, possibly a 




■ 




Close-up of battery compartment. Note VW relay, 15 con- 
ductor plug through to outside, fuses, and logic board 
mounting. 



truck, 

2. A steady tone after the 
alert — Overt action has been 
taken and entry has been 
gained, or the above truck 
totaled your car, 

3. A repeating alert signal 

only — You have just been 

called on one of the car 

radios. 

Construction was in an 

LMB 6" X 5" X 4" minibox 
{#AMC 1007). Two sub- 
chassis were bent to fit within 
the box and used to hold the 

transmitter and circuit boards 
(see photos). The battery 
pack is in between the two. 
Use was made of Waldom PC 
card terminals for easy ser- 
vicing. At each labeled input/ 
output pad, Waldom pins 
(#R-62-3) were used The 
connecting wires had crimp- 
on sockets (#0206 11 03) and 



were routed to a Waldom 
plastic 15 circuit connector 
shell on the outside of the 
housing, mounted through 
into the battery com part- 
men t. Also located in the 
battery compartment is the 
VW headlight dimmer relay 
(P/N 803941589). Tli is relay 
is a mechanical latching type 
so that a single momentary 
pulse to the coil will turn it 
on or off. One contact goes 
to the +12 fuse (Fig. 3} and 
the other goes to the **key 
in" on the PC board. A 
hidden push-button switch 
may then be used to turn the 
alarm on or off from any- 
where outside the car, in 
addition to having a more 
cumbersome (and secure) key 
switch. 

Also mounted through 
into ihe battery compartment 




View of completed unit Note battery pack and connectors. 



The automobile instaliation. The light is "on" when the alarm 

is not set. Of the two switches, the left, when pushed down, 
sets the tamper delay. When in the up position^ the tamper 
alarm Is on. The switch on the right controls another circuit in 
ihe car: 



73 




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above the Waldom connector 
shell are two #8 screws with 
fiber washers to insulate them 
from the chassis. A solder 
terminal is under each one- 
#14 wires are then soldered 
to these and go to the +12 
input fuse and relay K4, 
These two terminals then pass 
the heavy current required by 
the siren* 

The battery pack Is a 15 
volt, 1 Ah array made from 
12 commercial 1 Ah 1 .25 volt 
nicad cells. Since these were 
already available, I wired 



Fig. 6(q). PC board. 

ihem together in series and 
potted them in casting 
plastic, using an aluminum 
foil pie pan bent into a mold. 
These had solder tabSp but the 
flashlight "C" size will work 
every well with the plastic 
battery holders, which may 
be easily obtained, although 
they will take up more space. 
Other sources of 1 5 volt 
batteries are Motorola 
HT-220 (omni) or HT-200 
batteries, usually available for 
$5-00 from hamfests. A 
contact arrangement will have 



to be made up for these. For 
those of you with Motorola 
HTs, this is the very thing to 
use because you can use your 
HT chargers to keep the 
batteries up. 

The battery ratings should 
be at least 500 mAh and I Ah 
is best. The larger the battery 
rating, the more time you can 
go between charging. 

Two switches are mounted 
on the box. One is S2 (Fig. 
3), which allows me to tune 
the transmitter by turning on 
the carrier alone. It is an 



optional feature which is used 

when parked in crowded 
public areas, such as a 
summer blueg^ass festival, or 
ham flea market, where 
people lend to sit or lean on 
the cars. If the motion sensor 
is set off with this switch on, 
the horn will blow until 
motion ceases. I had many 
scratch marks on one car I 
owned that was usually 
parked in an area where 
people used to wait for buses. 
They wore exposed key rings 
and would lean back or sit on 
the car, leaving many deep 
scratches. It's very hard to sit 
on the hood of a car when 
the horn is blowing. 

The double-sided PC board 
has been laid out for small 
components. Tantalum capac- 
itors were used wherever 
there was a potential temper- 
ature problem (such as in the 
timing circuits) and also 
because of their size. CK05 
capacitors were used in other 
locations for bypass and noise 
padding. Other types can be 
used, but judiciously, to 
prevent variation in clock 
speed, deviation, etc., with 
temperature- Ceramic disc 
bypass capacitors can be used 
if they are the 25 volt size to 
fit the layout- 
After the board has been 
completed, you will need an 
audio amplifier and a 10 to 
1 5 volt source to check it 
out. Begin by setting all 
controls to their midrange. 
Attach the hot lead of the 
amplifier to the point marked 
Audio," -^-IS volts to the 
'+1 5" input, and *15 volts to 
the "-15" input. Also, attach 
the ground lead of the 
amplifier to the "-15" input, 
and connect a clip lead to the 
+1 5 volt battery lead. 

Using a VOM connected 
between -15 and ihe junction 
of R7 and D3, connect the 
free end of the clip lead to 
the "A" input. The VOM 
should indicate 6 to 7 volts, 
although higher readings are 
permissible. Next, move the 
probe to the junction of R8 
and D4 and check for 12 
volts here. 

At the same time, as yow 
connect the clip lead to the A 



ti 



i*. 



74 



input, you should hear a faint 
clicking noise from the audio 
amplifier and, after a short 
delay, you will hear the page 
tones followed by a steady 
alert tone. If this does not 
happen, the clock may be 
running loo slow. Adjust pot 
Rl, the clock adfustment* to 
a point at which something 
starts to happen with the 
tones. 

Move the clip lead from 
the "A" input to the *Tin" 
input and pulse it at a 2 or 4 
pps rate by tapping the clip 
a^inst the post. The voltagE 
at R7 and D3 should be 
constant and the paging 
sequence should start as 
before. The only difference 
will be the alert tone, which 
wilt be pulsing rather than 
steady - 

Now attach the clip lead 
to the 'T in'* post and adjust 
R1 for a one second 1st page 
tone or a Vi second on, Vi 
second off alert tone. 
Momentarily ground (-1 5) the 
*'T set'* input and insure that 
the voltage at R7 and 03 goes 
to zero until you monwu- 
tarify release the clip lead 
from the "T4n" post. This 
indicates the tamper delay is 
working. 

After the clock 15 adjusted 
and the circuit is performing 
correctly, check the radio call 
feature. Connect a clip lead 
between the ***15" input and 
'*RP** input. Then connect 
another clip lead between the 
point marked '*+T2'* (next to 
the '^RP*' input) and "+15". 
You should hear the two page 



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9| 



S^ 







\ \ \ \ 



'i 



I 




tones; however, the second 
tone will stay on for as long 

as you have the clip leads 
attached 

Assembly is simple and 
straightforward. The minibox 
bottom is divided into three 
equal parts by two subchassis 
bent to fit into the interior. 
Between the outside of the 
box and fastened to one 
subchassis is the control 
board A hole punched into 
this subchassis allows the 
wires from the various pin 
connectors to be routed to 
their various destinations, 
mostly the 15 
connector in 
compartment. 

The other subchassis holds 



pin Waldom 

the battery 







Fig. 6fb), Component layouL 

the transmitter board 
between it and the other side 
of the minibox. Power and 
audio is fed to it through two 
feedthrough capacitors. You 
will note in the photographs 
that this subchassis is bent to 
provide a ledge holding the 
feedthrough caps and the fuse 
holders. One set of fuses are 
spares. 

The antenna connector is 
mounted through to the 
transmitter compartment and 
a short piece (about 1 /2 inch) 
of #18 stranded wire attaches 
to the antenna output of the 
transmitter board. 

The battery compartment 
in the center holds the VW 



latching relay as well as the 
batteries. Depending on the 
size of the batteries you use, 
this may be otherwise empty 
with the batteries external to 
the box. If 12 "D" or "C*' 
cells are used, the box will 
have to be larger- Another 
alternative is to use a large 
dry 15 volt '*electronie equip- 
ment" battery, external to 
the box, making connections 
through the 15 pin con- 
nector. 

After completion of the 
wiring and mechanical 
assembly, plug in the 
batteries with the 1 Amp fuse 
removed. Check with a 
mil I iam meter to insure that 




View showing subchassis mounting. 



One of the tamper sensors mounted in place in the engine 
compartment 



7S 



only a couple of microamps 
are being drawn with no 
inputs enabled. If all i^ well, 
install the fuses. 

Tune ihe iransmittcr Into 
a dummy load using the tune 
switch. At this point, you can 
check operation of the paging 
alarm if the pager is close by. 
About four seconds after 
connecting a clip lead from 
the chassis to the "A in" or 
*Tin" inputs, the pager 
should emit its alert tone and 
sound the identification tone. 
If the circuit is left 
connected, after about 15 
seconds the entire cycle will 
repeat itself. 

Adjust the transmitter 
frequency trimmer to zero on 



the receiver (or vice versa) 
and adjust pots R38, R40, 
and R33 for proper audio. 
You will want to ideally be at 
±5 kHi deviation, but if you 
don't have a deviation 
monitor, adjust for as close to 
the same audio level as a 
voice transmission and then 
check with a scope to see that 
all the tones are roughly the 
s^me. After making sure the 
unit is operational, it may be 
installed in the car. 

A length of RG-S8 cable 
was routed to the rear win- 
dow and a metal clamp 
attached to the outer shield 
at the point where the cable 
emerged next to the win do w. 
The clamp was fastened to 



the window frame and the 
solid inner conductor 
stripped to a length of 20 
inches. A piece of 50 ib* test 
nylon fishline held this wire 
taut and was routed to a 
small bracket mounted above 
the window. Then, with the 
aid of a through-line watt- 
meter, the wire was trimmed 
for lowest swr. The top was 
formed into a loop and the 
fishline stretched from there 
to a small spring fastened to 
the bracket. This method has 
kept the wire taut yet 
allowed for parcels to hit it 
without breaking the wire* 

A key tock switch was 
installed on the body of the 
vehicle and is used in high 



1 

Parts List 


— Paging Counter 


U1 CD401 1 




U2 CD4024 




U3, U4 CD402S 




Q1 , 02, Q3, Q4, Q5, Q6, Q7 


NPN 2N3904, HEP S0025, etc- 


QS 


SCR 2N 5061, HEP RlOOt.etc 


Q9, Q10. Ql 1 , Q12, Q13. Q14, Ql 6 


NPN 2N3565, HEP S001 5, etc. 


Q15 


NPN soots HEP 


D1,D2.D5-D2S 


1N914, m4t48,etc- 


D3 


Zener, 6£ volt, % Watt 


D4 


Zeaer, 1 2.0 volt, % Watt 


R1 


5CX>k Poteniiomeier CTS X20TR5048 of equrv. 


R2, R24. R26, R57/R59 


68k % Watt 10% 


R3 


470k y* Watt 10% 



R4, R48,R50,R52 

R5 

R6 

R7, R1 1 , R23, R25, R49, R51 , R63 

R8 

R9. R27.R29 

RIO, R28. R30, R35, R39, R41 

R12 

H13, R14, B15. R16, R58 

R17, R18, R21 

R19, R31 

R20 

R22 

R32, R34 

R33, R38, R40 

R37 

R42, R44, R46 

R43,R45/R47 

R54,R55, R56, R57 

R36 deleted 

C1,C2 

C3,C4, cii,cig 

C6,C7,C8,C9,C33 

CIO. CI 2, CI 5, €18, C20, C23, C30 

C13,C22 

C14, CI 6, C21 , C24, C29, C31 

C2S 

C26, C27, C28 

K1 
K2 
K3 



4.7k y* Watt 10% 

220% Watt 10% 

270 y* Watt % 0% 

Ik % Watt 10% 

470 % Wan 10% 

10k y* Watt 10% 

100 y* Watt 10% 

1 0Ok % Watt 1 0% 

47k ^AWatt 10% 

33k %Watt 10% 

15k y* Watt 10% 

3.3k % Watt 10% 

47 % Watt 1 0% 

BBk % Wait 10% 

5k PotentiometBf , CTS X20tR502B 

300 ViWatt 10% 

160k 'A Watt 10% 

22k % Watt 10% 

27k y.Wati 10% 



4.7 uF Tantalum electrolvtic 

10 uF Tantalufn electrolytic 

22 uF Tantalum eiectrolytic 

.001 DtscorCKOS 

100 pF Ceramic disc 

*1 Ceramic disc 

1 uF Tantalum electrolytic 

,068 Ceramic disc 

.01 Ceramic disc or CK05 

SPST-NO DIP relay Magnecraft WIO? DIP 5 
DPST^NO DIP relsv Magnecraft W117 DIP 10 
SPST NC DIP relay Magnecraft W1 17 DIP 13 



risk areas, where the hidden 

push- but ion may not be as 
secure. The wires to this 
switch are routed to the 15 
pin connector on the alarm 
chassis. See Fig, 4{e). 

A momentary-on push- 
button switch was mounted 
in an easy-to-get-to yet 
unostentatious place on the 
outside of the car. In low risk 
areas, this switch is used 
exclusively as it allows quick 
and easy setling/unsetting of 
the alarm without the usual 
fumbling for the keys. The 
status bulb is located within 
the car on the dash. As 
mentioned before, when it is 
**on"p the alarm is not set, 
and when It is out, the alarm 
is set. This prevents an 
occasional uninterested 
glance inside by passers by to 
change to an interested glance 
when they notice a green 
light glowing. 

The switch for the tamper 
alarm set/reset function is 
also on the dashboard. This is 
a center off DPDT switch 
with a spring return in one 
position, and '*on'* in the 
other position. Depressing the 
switch momentarily, then 
quickly switching to the "on" 
position sets the tamper delay 
and readies the circuit so that 
when all preliminary motion 
has ceased, any further 
motion will sound the alarm. 

The tamper sensors are 
made by Empire- Mine were 
obtained at a discount auto 
parts store. The term "dis- 
count'' does not apply here 
because Ihey cost $10.00 
each and consist merely of a 
flat spring with a weight on 
one end. The whole thing is 
mounted in a small enclosure 
with the spring supported at 
one end. When the surfece to 
which it is attached is moved, 
the weight causes a 
pendulum-like effect and 
brings the grounded spring 
into contact with an adjust- 
able screw contact* 

One characteristic of the 
motion is that due to the 
force against the screw 
contact^ a smalt secondary or 
harmonic motion is imparted 
to the spring. As the car is 
driven to a halt and the alarm 



76 



set, the motion sensors 
gradually settle down. At 
some point, the motion of 
the spring will stop com- 
pteidy as the forces on it 
approach 180 degrees, and 
then it will start up again 
momentarily. The tamper 
delay circuitry senses this 
initial stop and unsets the 
delay, so that the tamper 
alarm will sound momentarily 
when the contacts close 
again. This is dependent to an 
extent on the sensitivity of 
the motion sensor, but serves 
as a handy checl< on the 
operation. Usually you are at 
your destination by the time 
the tamper circuitry arms 
itself, and you can tell if the 
beeper goes off whether or 
not you are too fer away or if 
the unit is not working. 

Additionally, these motion 
sensors are affected by 
temperature. If the sensitivity 
is set loo close and the unit 
then heats up, such as after 
driving, it may be closed by 
the time you drive to your 
destination. If you then set 
the tamper delay, it will never 
release until the car cools off 
and the contacts release, 
which could take hours. The 
short beep you will usually 
hear is an indication that all is 
welL 

Another check Is made 
when you enter the vehicle* 
The action of opening a door 
and sitting on the seat should 
be enough to set off your 
beeper and the switch may 
then be turned off. 

If you don't have your 
beeper with you one day, or 
other members of your 
family drive your car, a 
Sonalert hooked up as shown 
in Fig. 4(c) will remind them 
that you are transmitting if it 
sounds. It's very hard to be in 
the same car with a working 
Sonalert, so your transmitter 
and batteries will be 
preserved. 

The entire alarm box can 
be mounted anywhere 
convenient, provided the two 
switches can be reached with 
a minimum of trouble. In my 
Chevrolet ''Suburban,*' it is 
under the folding rear seat 
and near the door so that 



Parts Lrst — Alarm 



017, Q19, Q20 

013 

029,30,31,32 

R60, R62, R63 

R61,R64, R65 

R66 

R67 

R68 

R^ 

R70 

K4 

G32A 

C33 

C34 



2N3904 or equivsJent NPN 

MPS'A14 orequivalenr Oarlingtofi NPN 

tN914, 1N4148, etc. 

2.2k % Watt 10% 

4.7k % Watt 10% 

6Bk % Watt 10% 

lOOk % Watt 10% 

500 k Pot CTS X201R504B 

2.7k % Watt 10% 

39 1 Wan 

4PDT Magnecraf t W77CSX'1 or equivalent 

.001 Ceramic disc or CK05 
1 uF Tantalum 
68 gF Tantalum 



servicing is easy and the 
switches are within easy 
reach. The individual wires 
from the mating IS pin 
conductor are made up into a 
harness with wire ties and run 
to the front of the car, where 
connections are made to the 
various devices. With this 
harness^ a #14 ^uge wire is 
also run, which connects to 
the battery terminal at the 
starter solenoid. This wire 
connects to the "+12 input" 
fn the box. Another length of 
#14 wire goes from the 
■'switched +12*' terminal on 
the box to the power switch 
on the electronic siren. The 
function switch on this siren 
is set to the 'V^'p*' Tiode. 

The transmitter io be used 
is left up to the user. My 
version J as said before, uses 
the GE Voice Commander 11 
board. The VC II or VC III 
are okay, and HT-200 boards 
are available at hamfests very 
inexpensively. If you cannot 
locate any of these, VHF 
Engineering sells an in- 
expensive kit which is 12 volt 
negative ground* Since it will 
not work directly with the 
positive ground arrangement 
used with the circuit board, a 
small relay should be used to 
switch the transmitter on or 
off by placing the contacts in 
series with the vehicle battery 
or an auxiliary 12 volt 
battery. 

The operating frequency 
of the transmitter and pager 
must be judiciously chosen. 
146.94 is loo popular, 
repeater input frequencies are 
frowned upon, and use of the 



commercial bands is a 
definite no. A choice could 
be 147.015, 146.475, or any 
other offbeat frequency. 
146_94 was used in my first 
version with the HT-220 
because I didn't want to 
"waste" a crystal position. 
When I switched to the pager, 
I kept this frequency at first; 
however, at hamfests .94 
would be disrupted if some- 
one leaned against the car 
and, at one, the special .94 
repeater covered up my alarm 
signal comptetely. 

At the time of writing, this 
new unit has been installed 
for two years and has ex- 
hibited complete reliability. 
The present car (bought two 
years ago) has been broken 
into S times. Six times the 
alarm went off as they 
opened the doors (1 keep 
them unlocked to prevent 
breakage). Twice the tamper 
alarm went off in the middle 
of the night and as I hurriedly 
threw my clothes on, the 
pulsed tone changed to a 
steady tone and all hell broke 
loose outside. The thief in 
these cases had pried open a 
vent window without trying 
the door first, rolled the main 
Window down, and opened 
the door by reaching inside. 
The motion circuitry 
detected the break*in and the 
alarm sensors detected the 
opening of a door* 

Certain tamper signals 
have also alerted me to the 
faa that various things were 
happening. Once I caught a 
person trying to parallel park 
In front of me in a space too 



small For his car. He backed 
into me and tried to push my 
car back, a poor thing to do 
to an automatic transmission 
left in park. Two children 
climbing on my car with hard 
shoes on were asked to get 
off, and other miscellaneous 
unintentional nudgings and 
movements were detected as 
they happened. 

The battery gets charged 
overnight every two months 
or so, but rarely needs it. I 
charge these 1 Ah celts at a 
steady TOO mA and tempo- 
rarily use a standby battery 
for protection. 

Another use for a device 
like this is to build it into a 
larger chassis with an antenna 
attached and with built-in 
motion detectors. The unit is 
then portable and may be 
simply placed on the seat or 
floor of a car» trailer, camper, 
etc., or hung from the door 
of a house* On a float, it can 
function as a wireless 
swimming pool alarm. Store 
owners with large, lit signs 
that get vandalized in the 
night can put one in the sign. 
One can be installed in a 
motorcycle, boat (with 
different sensors), private 
plane, etc. Since the pager 
receiver does not *'hear" 
anything until after the two- 
tone page signal. It can be left 
on at all times, even while in 
the charger, and no irritating 
chit-chat or interference will 
ever be apparent. The range 
of the system is sufficient 
that a reliable alert will be 
heard to a radius of at least a 
mile. ■ 



^ 



77 



I 



) 





YD-844 
Dynamic Mike 



ADVANCED COMMUNICATION 

EQUIPMENT 




QTR-24 
World Clock 



o 



VI 




I 
tfi 



S 




< 



« 




Left to 
Speaker 



- FRG-7, Solid State Synthesized Communications Receiver • FR-101 Digital Solid Slate Receiver • SP-101B, 
FR-101. Digital Solid State Receiver • FL-101, 100 W Transmitter • FL-2100B. 1200 W PEP input Linear Amplifier 



.^^^;^.^j:^^^--^ 




Left to right - FT-620B, 6 Meter Transceiver * YP-t50. Dummy Load Wattmeter • YO-100, Monitor Scope • FTV-250, 
2 Meter Transverter • FTV-650, 6 Meter Transverler • FV-101B, External VFO • FT-10IE 160-1 OM Transceiver 




Left to right - YC-601 , Digital Frequency Display • YC-355D, Frequency Counter • FP-301 , AC Power Supply * FT-301S 
Digital, All Sdid State Transceiver • FV-301, External VFO • FT-221, 144-148 All Solid State All Mode Transceiver 



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THE PACESETTER 
IN AMATEUR RADIO 




m70CA 



S599.00 



m ALL MODE iASE/MOBflE TRANSCEtVER. 

SSB (upper and lowerj, FM. AM and CW. AC arid 
0€. 4 MHz band coverage ( T 44 lo T4a MHz). Dial 
in receiver frequency and TS-7D0A automatically 
swuches xmitier freq. SOO KHz for repeater 
aperatioa. Xmit. Rev capability on 44 Ch, with 1 1 
xtal£. 





Tsazo 



$869.00 



TR74Q0A 



S399.00 



ZM MOBILE TRANSCErVER. Synthesized PLL. 
Seleciable ouipui, 25 watts or 10 watts. 6 Digit 
LED freq. display. 144443 MH2. SQO CH. in S 
KHz steps. SOO KHz repeater offset. Contiiruous 
tonfl^coded squelch (CTSCK Tone Burst. 



^fi TRANSCEIVER, PLL RF IVTonltOf Noise 
B tanker. Digital hold loctcs counter h disfilay ai 
any tiiquency, but allows VFQ to tune normally. 
True RF comprsssnr a df instable speech processof, 
IF shift control. H¥ attenuator. VOX, GAIN, 
ANTIVOX and VOX delay controls. RF neptive 
feedback. Optional digital readouL DM Dial. High 
stability FET VFO. 



TS520S 




$049,00 



SSI TRANSCEIVER, Prown In the sfiacks of 
thousands of discriminating haint, field day i^ies, 
DX and contest stations and mobile installations, 
Supe^ engineering and styling. 



SP^BZD - S2Z.95 

Optional exiemal speaker for better reBdability. 

TV-S02 S24900 

TRANSVERTER. Puts you on 2M the easy way. 
144-145J MHz or optional 145-14e MHz. 



1^5 



S79.0D 



POWER SUPPLY FOR 
TRB300. DesigneiJ 
cially for home QTH. 




z 



Tfl'7200A 



$249.00 



2M MOfllLE/BASE FM TRANSCEiVER. Ignition 
interference cOBIrol. 2 pole Xtaf fitter in IF rcvr. 
Protection lor final stafs transistor S reverse 
pobriiy cofinecimnt Pfio^fjty Ch, switch. Quick 
rcJease mount. LEO CH, indicators. Swnch^le 
lOWor 1W output 




MC5Q 



$39 J{) 



Dynamic microphone designed expressly for ama- 
teur radio operation. Compleie with PIT and 
LOCK switches, and a microphone plug. (600 or 
50k ohm) 




COJVIMLtNICATlONS RECEIVER. 13 to 29J 
MHz, WWV and CB hand. 50 MH7, 144 MHz con- 
verter opuonaL Stable VFO & usinllatar lor 5 
fi^ced chanaels. 1 KHz dial readout. Xtal filters 
(SSB/e pole, CW/B pole, AM/6 pole}, Squelch, 
S meter, HqIsb blanker. 



S'S99-$igj4 R'599AS459.0Q T399DS479.QD 

SSB TRANSMITTERp 35 to 29.7 MHz. Stable 
VFO. 1 KHz dial readout. 8 poEe Xtal fjjter, AM 
Xmiss^on available, Buiit-in AC pwr supply. Split 
frequency control available. 




VFO-8Z0 




$145.00 



Otsipied exclusively for u« with TS-820. RIT 
circuit and control switch. Fully compatibli wtth 
optional digital disptay, 

VFfKI^ Wot Shown) St 1 G.OO 

Solid State Remote VFO. RIT circuit with LED 
indicator. 




TR2200A 



S229.00 




R300 



SZ39JI} 



PORTABLE 2M FM TRANSCEIVER. 12 Ch. 
capacity. Removable leiescoping anttfina, Exiernat 
12 VOC or internal Ni-CAD batteries. 146-143 
MHz. E CH. supplied. Switchable 2W or 4DQmW 
output. 



AIL BAND COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVER. 
AC, batteries or external DC. 170 KHz to 30 MHz 
in 6 bands. Foreign broadcasts or ham radio In 
AM, SSB and CW. Dual gate MOS/FET transfstors 
^ double conversion. Band spread dial, 500 KHz 
marker. 



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KNOWN FOR QUALITY 
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RECEIVE 


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SSR'I 




General Coverage, .5 to 300 MHz 


$350.00 


SPR-4 




Programmable, Solid State 


S629.00 


DSR-2 




VLFHF Digital Synthesized SSB. 








AM, CW, ISB, RTTY 


$2950.00 


R-4C 




C-Line. HF. 160-lOM 


$599.00 


4NB 




Noise Blanker for R-4C 


$70.00 


5NB 




Noise Blanker for SPR-4 


$70.00 


TRANSMITTER 




T-4XC 




C-Line. HF. 160-10M 


iS99.00 


TRANSCEIVERS 




TR-4CW 




80-10M. SSB,AM, CW 


$699.00 


TR-33C 




2M,FM, 12 CH. Portable 


$229.95 


MMK-33 




Mobile/Dash/Desk Mount for TR- 








330 


$1 2.95 


34PNB 




Plug-In Noise Blanker for TR-4 








Series 


$100.00 


MMK-3 




Mobile Mount for TR-4 


$7.00 


RV-4C 




Remote VFO for TR-4 CW 


$150.00 


FF-t 




Crystal Control for TR-4 


$46.95 


SYNTHESIZER 





FS-4 



GenerBl Coverage for 4- Line and 
SPR-4 



LINEAR AMPLIFIER 



L-4B 



MATCHING NETWORKS 




$250.00 



Linear and w/power supply & tubes $895.00 



MN-4 


Antenna Matching Network. 200W 


S1Z0.UU 


MN-2000 


Antenna Matching Network. 1000W 


$240.00 


RCS-4 


Remote Control Antenna Switch 


$120.00 


W-4 


RF Wattmeter, 1.8 to 54 MHz 


$72.00 


WV-4 


RF Wattmeter, 20 to 200 MHz 


$84.00 


7072 


Hand Held Microphone 


$19.00 


7075 


Desk Top Microphone 


$39.00 


1525EM 


Pushbutton Encoding Microphone 


$49.95 


HS-1 


Head Phones 


$10.00 


AA 10 


low, 21VI Amplifier 


$49.95 


TV-300-HP 


300 ohm High Pass TV Set Filter 


810.60 


TV-7S-HP 


75 ohm High Pass TV Set Filter 


$13.25 


TV-42-LP 


Transmitter Low Pass Filter. 100W 


$14.60 


TV-3300-LP 


Transmitter Low Pass Filter. 1000W 


S26.60 


TV-5200-LP 


Transmitter Low Pass Filter. 1000W. 






100W, 6M 


$26.60 



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Unmatched for mobile and fixed station applications. 175VV 
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Can be used fof RTTY. Filter type SSB generation. Automatic 
load controL Inverse RF feedback. Reirneabililvtuned variable 
oscillator. 





75S-3C RECEIVER SZ504J0 

Sharp selectivity. SSB, CW and RTTY. Single control rejection 

tuning. Variable BFO. Optional mei^anical filters for CW, 
RTTY and AM«. 2.1 KHi mechanical filter. Zener regulated 
oscillators. 3'po$ition AGC. 



32S-3A TRANSMITTER $2597.00 

Covers all ham bands between 3.4 MHz and 30 MHz. Nominal 
output of 100W. 175W, SSB and 160W CW. Dual conversion. 
Automatic ioad control, RF inverse feedback. CW spotting 
controL Collins mechanical filter. 






3flL 1 LINEAR AMPLIFIER $1536.00 

1000 watts PEP on SSB and 1D0Q Average on CW. Single con- 
trol rejection tuning (50 dB). Variable BFO. 2J kHz 
Mechanical filter. Zener regulated oscillators. 3 position AGC. 
Exclusive comparator circuit. 






319B-3 SPEAKER 
$80.00 




■ 31 SB -4 

SPEAKER CONSOLE 

$546.00 





3l3B-$ VrO CONSOLE 
$191S.00 






51W-2 AC POWER SUPPLY 
$440.00 



30^C^3 DIRECrrOHAL WATT METER 

$360.00 



t>L-1 DUMMY LOAD 
$870.00 



MASTERCHARGE & BANKAMERICARD ACCEPTED 



DIVISION OF TREVOSe ELECTRONICS 



likklzniVJIiUVJI \f3zh 



173'r!R3I3?1itE 



I 



I 



1 



Biiyi THRULINE® WATTMETER 







• BUY ONLY THE ELEMENTS YOU NEED 
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Table 1 



STANDARD 
ELEMENTS 



MODEL 43 



A- 






t^requency Sands 


(MHz) 




Power 














RanKC 


2- 


25< 


so- 


100- 


200- 


400- 


30 


60 


ils 


250 


SOO 


1000 


5 watts 


^ 


5A 


5B 


sc 


5D 


SE 


10 watts 


— 


10A 


10B 


IOC 


TOO 


10€ 


25 watts 


— 


2SA 


23B 


25C 


25D 


2SE 


^0 watts 


SON 


50A 


soe 


soc 


50D 


SOE 


100 waits 


100H 


100 A 


1003 


lOOC 


100D 


100E 


250 watts 


2S0H 


250A 


25QB 


250C 


250D 


250E 


500wafls 


SOOH 


500A 


500B 


sooc 


500D 


5O0E 


10iO watts 


1000H 


TOOOA 


1000B 


1000C 


1000D 


1000E 


2500 watts 


2500 H 












5000 watts 


5000 H 













Table 2 

LOW- 
POWER 
ELEMENTS 



t watt 


Cat. No, 


2.S watti 


bO^O MHi 


060-1 


m-m MHi 


H>>9S MHz 


oao-1 


aO-95 MHz 


95-125 MHz 


095-1 


95-150 MHz 


110^160 MHr 


no-1 


150-250 MHi 


150^250 MHz 


150-1 


200-300 MHi 


200-300 MHz 


200-1 


25{>450 MHz 


275'450MHi 


275-1 


400-650 MHz 


425-^50 MHz 


425-1 


800-950 MHz 


800-9S0 MHz 


flOO-1 





Cai. No. 

060-2 
OBO-2 
095-2 
150-2 
200-2 
250-2 
400-2 
80D-2 



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The ontv 1000 wstt, ''single package" 
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8^ MARINE EQUIPMENT 

IC-245. 146 MH^ FM 10W XCVR. LSI 
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programmable, 60 dB spurious atienua- 

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IC 502. 6 METER SSB & CW PORTA- 
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plus 14G-U7 MHz on m. Work AMAT 
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IC-2ZS. 145 MHi FM lOW XCVR. Cf.l OS synthesizer can beset to any 15 ^Hz ch, her vween 
146 & 14B MN2 by diode matrix board, Spurioysatteouation far belter ihan FGC spec. lOW 
or rw. !DC modulation control. 





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SWR bridge. 117 VAC and 13.6 VDC 
pwr supplies, $399. QO 

DVZ1. DIGITAL VFO. Use with IC- 
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$299,00 



IC20L 2 METER SSB 
PQRTA8LE XCVB. Puts 
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Internal C taattertes or ex- 
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True I.F. noise blanker. 
144.0, 144.2 on two other 
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IC'30A. 450 MHz FM LOW XCVR. IW 
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TEMPO 




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AC/ONE 

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ONE 


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109.00 


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MHi.PLL 


399.00 


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Digital 


759.00 


2W, VHF/FM. 6 Ch. Hand 




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199.00 


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42.95 


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39.00 


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99.00 



ATLAS 




21 OX 
215X 
OMK 

220CS 
350^XL 

DD6XL 

305 

311 

35aPS 

DMK-XL 



Transceiver. 1 80M. 200 W 679.00 

Transceiver. 15-160M. 200W 679.00 

Deluxe Mtg. Kit for 21 OX & 

21 5X 48,00 

AC Console for 21 OX & 21 5X 149.00 

Transceiver, SSB. Solid State. 

1 0-1 60M. 350W. 995.00 

Digital Dial Readout for 350- 

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Plug'lr* Auxifiary VFO. For 

350XL 155.00 

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ciHator for 350-XL 135 00 

AC Pwr Supply w/Spkr fit 

Phone Jack for 350- XL 195.00 

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SWAN 




700 CX 

VX2 
SS16B 

MARK II 



1200 X 



FP1 



FC76 

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FS'2 

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W2M0 

WM3000 

FS'1 

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Transceiver. 700W PEP. SSB. 
aO-IOM. USB, LSB or CW 
Plug-in VOX for 700 CX 
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700 CX 

Linear Amphfiere Full Legal 
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Portable Linear Amplifier. 
1200W PEP, SSB. 700W, Ch. 
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Hybrrd Telephone Patch. Con- 
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lines 



649.95 
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99.95 



849.95 



349.95 



0^.33 



Frequency Counter, 5 Digit 

LED 169,95 

In-Line Presidon Wattmater 

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Pocket SWR Meter 12.95 

Relative Power Meter & SWR 

Bridge 25.95 

Jn-Ltne Wattmeter. 3 Scales 

to 2000W* 3.5 to 30 MHz 59;95 

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to 1500W. 2 to 50 MHz 74.95 



Linear Amplifier. Full Legal 
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■ ~ wnsvilleRd • Tre vose, Pa. 1 9047 



1 


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y\ m 3 Kilowatt Tuner Matches 

UBnifOri— Everything From 160 to 10 



IfiOaO BfAT 

Buitt'ln 
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Front Panel Antenna 
Selector far 
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TO YOUR ANTENNA 

DenBn^ SVPERAMP 



only $299.50 



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Super 
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160-10 Meters 
Balanced Line, 
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Maximum Power Transfer, Xmitter to Antenna. 

1 KW Model $1 29.50 3 KW Model $229.50 




DerHfOTL. ANTENNAS 

The Shy Openers 





SKVMASTEfl 

A futly ritmlapsd md tnlid 27 foot 

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■Pw Sop^ Amp run* 4 full 2000 warn P,i#, wput on SSS, grid 1000 w«t» DC <»rt CW; RTTV 
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in 



DIVISION OF TREVOSE ELECTRONICS 



Jim Qverstrest WA5DXP 
Electronic Systems Corp. 
228 Cooiidge St. 
Jefferson LA 70121 



Try Your KIM 



On RTTY 



-- CUL on your computer 



KIM-1 is an eight bit 
microprocessor sold by 
MOS Technology/ which 
uses the MCS 6502 chip as its 
central processing unit (CPU), 
KIM stands for "Keyboard 
Input Monitor" and describes 
the software residing in read 
only memory (ROM) on the 
two 6530 multipurpose 40 
pin chips on the KIM-1 
board. 

My reason for choosing 
the KIM-1 was price. The 
whole KIM computer! with 
cassette interface, keypad, 
TTY interface, LED readouts 
for address and data, costs 
under $250* For the begin- 
ner, there arc some "bad" 



features about it, which I 
should mention. 

To use the KIM-I^ you 
must build your own power 
supply and cabinet Also, the 
user manual and other docu- 
mentation is oriented more 
toward the computer pro- 
totyper than to the hobby isL 
Very few examples are giveh 
in the documentation 
supplied, and the user really 
has to dig into the machine to 
gel to know iL Software has 
been very scarce, but, since 
the KIM-1 users group was 
formed,^ more and more 
software is becoming avail- 
able. 

On the positive side, MOS 



•«w 



ST-* ^ 



mMQGO 

-W — 






im 



ItCtLJilE 



^ 



1/e 7*0* 

1>- 



■^ TO PIN (I Q*t KIH 






Fig, h Interface required to canned ST-6 FSK key fine (or any 
RS-232C level signoi) to KlM-h 

88 



Technology Is making quite 
an inroad into their own soft- 
ware developmanL They will 
soon make a full math 
package available in ROM, as 
well as a complete editor- 
asserttbler (single pass type) in 
ROM also. To me, this Is 
what is needed in the 
industry; by making the 
"firrrfware" a permanent part 
of the '*hardwar&/* you do 
not have to spend a largs 
amount of lime and trouble 
loading programs via cassette 
(which on KIM operates at 
about 135 baud)* 

The two programs 
included are not originaL 
They are 5502 adaptations of 
programs which have already 
been published elsewhere for 
other type processors.^ '^ To 
use these programs, it is 
assumed you have^ along with 
K I M - 1 , a w orking CRT 
terminal with a serial I/O 
interface. I use an Infoton 
BASIC with a full-dupiex 20 



mA loop hooked to the 
KIMT 20 mA loop terminals 
on the applications con- 
nector. 1 run my terminal at 
4800 baud usually. 

^ ■ 

The Baudot Receive Pro-am 

The first program was 
developed out of sheer neces- 
sity. Since I am interested in 
amateur radioteletype 
(RTTY), 1 needed a way to 
qtjiet thin^ down around the 
shack while copying press 
broadcasts and amateur sta- 
tions. My Model 28 KSR 
compact is very noisy, and, 
since KlM-1 and my CRT 
terminal make no noise, it 
sure is a lot easier on the 
nerves. 

This is the listing for the 
Baudot (5 level) receive con- 
verter (or monitor), which is 
in use daily at this station. 
The FSK converter I use is 
the ST'6 built from the HAL 
kit^ The output of the ST-6, 
which I use to feed the com- 
puter, is the FSK line output, 
which is normally used to 
drive the FSK circuit of the 
amateur's transmitter. Irv 
Hoff, who designed the ST-6j 
in his wisdom chose the com- 
puter industry standard 
RS-232C levels for this 
output. This means that the 
output signal jumps in a 
discrete transition from -12 V 
to +12 V, which signify mark 
and space respectively^, For 
more information on RTTY 
and the equipment you need 
to get started, see reference 6. 

tn order to make the ±12 
V mark-space levels com- 
patible with the and +5 voli 
levels neecfed by KlM-1, you 
must first construct an "inter- 
face.*' This interface is very 
simple, and uses only four 
electroriic components. See 
Fig. T 

Unlike the KIM-1 monitor, 
which is completely self- 
adjusting in regard to baud 
rate, this monitor requires 
that you load two values into 
locations 0274 and 0283 for 
the various speeds you wish 
to copy. See Fig, 2. You will 
notice locations 0227 to 
023F were left blank. If you 
wish to incorporate *'un shift 
on space" in your monitor, 




simply insert the unshift on 
space routine given at tf|e end 
of the listing in the locations 
designated {locations 0220 to 
022A). You would use the 
listing without the "unshift 
on space*' for copying 
weather broadcasts and the 
listing with "unshift on 
space" for press and amateur 
copy. 

To use this Baudot mon* 
itof, construct the interface 
■and check the output with a 
voltmeter before hooking it 
up to pin 8 of the applica- 
tion^ connector. You can use 
your receiver calibrator to 
supply the necessary mark 
and space signals to the con- 
verter, and the output of the 
interface should be at TTL 
levels. If you get the correct 
levels, hook the output of the 
interface to pin 8 of the 
applications connector. Next, 
load the program into the 
KIM-1 (hopefully via 
cassette), and make sure you 
loaded the correct delay 
constants mr the speed you 
wish to copy from Fig, 2. 
Remember, most US press 
broadcasts use 66 wpm, so l^e 
sure to change the delay 
constants. The computer is 
not as forgiving as the Model 
28j which can receive 56 
wpm RTTY with 60 wpm 
gears. 

CW Transmit Routine 

This routine is basically a 
65Q2 version of the program 
mentioned in reference 4. It 
really comes in handy on the 
CW net I check into several 
times weekly. If you would 
like to hear a sample of the 
CW this routine produces, 
tune in the Liberty Net on 
3750 kHz at 8 pm CST on 
Wednesday and Saturday 
nights. 1 have used the same 
nomenclature used by Sewell, 
so you should have no 
trouble following the 6502 



i/ft r404 



t/C ?4Ct4 



s KIM >— a >?^ — M y^ 

LlCATlONS X^f^ ^^ 



rAOH 
ON 

COhNECTOfi 



47i 



Location 


60 wpm 


66 wpm 


75 wpm 


1O0 wpm 


0274 


OB 


OA 


08 


OS 


0283 


15 


14 


11 


OD 



Fig, Z Delay constants to be loaded into locations 0274 and 0283 for various RTTY ^eeds. 



algorithm. 

The most important differ- 
ence between ihe 5800 CPU 
and the 6502 chip is the 
method used by each for 
indirect addressing. The 6800 
uses a full 16 bit fndex 
register, whiie the 6502 uses 
two 8 bit index registers. 
Thus, urhen crossing a page 
boundary (256 bytes/page) 
with the 6502 In the indexed 
addressing mode, ypu musi 
use quite a few tricks to keep 
from putting out an invalid 
address when on the first 
byte of the new page, The 
method I used can be seen at 
locations ODIA through 
0021, and 004 A through 
004 F, 

The buffer in this routine 
(ASDRIVER) is 512 bytes 
long, and includes ail of pages 
2 and 3 of my unexpafided 
KlM-l. Thus, since my 
terminal has 80 characters/ 
line» t can store about 614 
lines of text before overrun- 
ni ng the bu f fer. 51 2 by t^ 
will keep you from getting 
too long-winded. If your KIM 
is expanded and has more 
than the 1 K of memory mine 
has, you can be as long: 
winded as you like- This rou- 
tine will automatically cross 
the page boundaries for you 
(1 pity the poor guy on the 
other end, though). 

You must construct an 
interface from the TTL level 
output of pin 14 of the 
applications connector to 
your transmitter. Since J use 
the Heath SB400 which has 
about +25 V on the CW 
keyline, this interface is a 
little more involved than the 
one for the RTTY interface 
described above. However; it 
uses the same 7404 chip as 






mi22t 




4TK 



i;^iSot 



—TO C* itCTTUJ 
0»d SS-400 



2 for TfU«SMlTTEn 



330 



*5V 
J 



Fig. 3. Interface between KiM-l and 58-400 transmitter. See 
text for source of other circuits covering other transmitters. 



the RTTY interface, and both 
can be [eft connected to- 
gether. See Fig. 3. If your 
transmitter will not work 
with this keyer, see the TTL 
Cookbook for other examples 
or the articles by Hoff in 
RTTY journai Don't forget 
to connect pin 14 of the 
7404 chip to +5 volts and pin 
7 to ground. 

You will note m the com- 



this a cursor left?^' What this 
means is that my Infoton 
terminal has a separate cursor 
control keypad to control the 
cursor without affecting the 
display* Infoton uses the hex 
code "lA" to indicate a 
cursor left or backspace. 
Backspace in this routine is 
used to correct any mistakes 
white using the buffered rou- 
tine. You hit backspace (in 



a 



ents 


!or 


IOC 


:ation \ 


JU^Hj 


IS 


my case, cursor lett j d 










lSM?t^«5if^ 


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Thus the double-decrement 
of the x-pointer in locations 
002 F and 0030, If your ter- 
minal uses another code for 
backspace, simply insert it in 

location 002C. Notice loca- 
tions 0000 and 0001 in the 
listing. These are labeled 
ELSPEED and CHRSPEED . 
These locations are for timing 
constants used in the delay 
routines by the timer, at loca- 
tions OOCF and OODF, For 
normal CW, location 0000 
contains the speed you desire 
(a value of hex 30 = 20 wpm, 
hex 50 ==^ 10 wpm, etc.), and 
location 0001 contains the 
spacing between individual 



characterSi and should con- 
tain hex 03 (which means the 
spacing between characters 
will be equal to 3 dot 
lengths). Larger numbers in 
location 0000 give progres- 
sively slower CW speeds, and 
vice versa. When using the 
SINGLECH routine, location 
0001 should contain hex 01. 
Notice that the buffered rou- 
tine starts at location 0005 
and the single character rou- 
tine starts at location 0145. If 
you desire to switch from one 
to the other, you must stop 
KIM, In the KlM-l user 
manual, the method for doing 
this is not made clear. You 
must load the NMI vector 



(the vector you get by push- 
ing the stop key on the key- 
pad} into locations 17FAand 
17FB. Then, when you push 

the stop button, the NMI line 
is brought low and signals an 
interrupt to the 6502 chip. 
Internally the 6502 com- 
pleles its present instruction 
and jumps to locations 17 FA 
and 17FB for directions on 
where to go to service the 
interrupt. The program 
counter will then address the 
location contained in 17FA 
and 17FB. MOS Technology 
recommends loading ICOO 
into this location. Butj you 
must load them in reverse, 
with the low order byte first. 
Thus, remember to always 
load 00 into location 17FA 
and IC in location 17FB. 
This is the first thing you 
should do when bringing up 
the computer. 



There is another pecth 
liarity of KIM which is not 
stressed enough in the docu- 
mentation. This concerns the 

use of the flag status register 
at location OOFl while using 
the cassette interface* Since 
the 6502 chip has a decimal 
mode of arithmetic opera- 
tion, and since the cassette 
interface will only work in 
the binary mode of opera- 
tion, you must al\%^ys clear 
the decimal flag before any 
cassette load or dump opera- 
tions. Simply load hex 00 
into location OOFl before 
using the cassette. 

To use this CW routine, 
load your program into the 
computer, and be sure to load 
your code speed into loca- 
tions 0000 and 0001. If you 
wish to use the buffered 
output, go to location 0005, 









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hii a "G'\ and type your 
message (up to 51 2 characters 
using ihe basic KIM). Do not 
hit any line feeds until you 
are ready to transmit, as this 
is the character which starts 
the transmit portion of the 
program. Let the terminal 
supply the returns and line 
feeds. If you make a mistake, 
hit backspace and type over 
it* When your message is com- 
plete and ready to transmit, 
sfmply hit a line feed, and 
you will hear sortie mighty 
fine CW going out. Fig. 4 lists 



some special keys used for 
CW characters having no 
ASCII equivalents. 

To use the single character 
routine, start the program at 
location 0145- The character 
you type will be output 
immediately after each key is 
hit This routine is a must for 
break-in operation. 

In summary, both of these 
routines have been in use for 
several months at my QTH. I 
had considered writing a CW 
receive routine, but, as Wayne 
Green W2NSD/1 mentioned 



in his talk at the New Orleans 
Computcrfest, most fists are 
so bad even the best algo- 
rithms cannot copy them 
unless the sender is using an 
electronic keyer And, as he 
pointed out so well, CW is ten 
steps backward in technology 
and will remain so until hams 
gel off their seats and write 
the FCC demanding the use 
of ASCII on the ham bands. • 

References 

^ MOS Technologv inc., 950 
Rittenhouse Rd., Morristown PA 
1 9401 „ 



"^ KIM-1 User Notes, c/o Eric C. 
Rehnke, PO Box 33077, N. 
RovaitonOH44133- 

^ Borgerson. "Baudot to ASCII/' 
73 MagazinB, Nov. 1976, p* 172, 

"* Sewen, "If Only Sam Mor^e 
CcHjId See Lis Now/' Byte Maga- 
itne^ October 1976* p. 42, 

^ Hoff, "ST-6 Solid State 
Dtmodulator/' RTTY Journal, 
Sept. 1970. 

^ Green, "RTTY Handbook/* 73 
Magazine^ Peterborough NH 
03458, S5.95. 

"^ Simpson, ''A Date With Kim/' 
Byre Magazine, May 1976, This 
article gives a complete descrip- 
tion of the KlM-1 computer* 



Attention: ham operator/computer owners 

inlD anv AlTAIA. .r. . • dim S100 Enis c-unipflTfilE cwmptnt' ina pinviflf t+w nwdtn] -m ■(?**** uipptiilirii lor mamlfl prmna i/rie 0* (Jay m i Taufi jhp cwripulL"' can suil^ 
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□ Please sernJ me info on the new Commodore PET 200T 
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A Division of Newman Compiiter Exchange. Inc 



Dept. 73 



C4T 



Larry Leyy WA2INM 
ilME.lSSu 
Broofcfyn NY I J 230 



S.Q Sales 




SO Review 



-- quality at a good price 



With the price of 
hobby computer 
equipment going from expen- 
sive to overpriced and, lately, 

to outrageous, I have been 
home brewing most of my 
computer equipment- This 
makes it more affordable, as 
the price of the components 
pius the cost of a wire-wrap 
Altair S-100 card is usually a 
small fraction of the price of 
the equivalent kit. 1 have 
designed and built a complete 
Altair S-100 bus computer 
for about $100 150 less CPU 
card. This computer has all 
the panel functions of a com- 
mercial machine, such as the 
IMSAI, and performs equally. 
It was original ty designed to 
use the somewhat obsolete 
8080 CPU card that was re- 
moved from my other com- 
puter when I changed over to 
a Z-80- Howeve^^ as anyone 
who has ever used both chips 
can telt you, once you have 
used a Z-SO you will not be 
able to tolerate the poor in- 

34 /J . 



St ruction set and processing 

inefficiency of the 8080, 
About that time I saw an ad 
for the $149,95 Z-80 CPU 
card from S.D, Sales. It was 
fantastic and was at a price 
that was less than my first 
Z-80 card cost to build. Of 
course, the price of the Z-80 
had dropped somewhat since 
I built my first card, but the 
price was stilt around the 
current cost of parts to build 
a card> so I ordered one* 

Having built several micro- 
computer kitSp and lived with 
poor documenution, poor 
quality boards, idiotic designs 
that were very hard to 
change, etc., I didn't really 
know what to expect at such 
a low price. But, past 
experience with S. D, Sates 
on parts orders had shown me 
that they were reputable, 
quick, and generally offered a 
good value with prime quality 
parts* This still did not com- 
pletely prepare me for the 
surprise that I got when I 



opened the package. 

The PC board was one of 
the best quality boards 1 have 
ever seen. Fully solder 
masked, high quality plating, 
plated through holes - . . 
everything! The design was 
really superb - two 5 V 
regulators with heat sinks 
(most CPUs really need two 
as the current required for all 
the buffers really heats up 
one), heavy power buses with 
a fantastic ground plane^ 
silver mica caps, precut, pre- 
formed resistors (most re- 
sistors and caps were precut, 
preformed, and ready to 
insert in the PC board), a very 
thick book on the design, 
software, and hardware 
differences between the Z-80 
and 8080j complete instruc- 
tions for assembly, and a 
Z-80 manual. The ICs were all 
prime quality with very 
recent date codes. All of the 
component values (pan num- 
bers) were screened excep- 
tionally clearly on the 



component side of the boards 

and the IC numbers and conrv 
ponent numbers are still 
visible after installing sockets 
(there were sockets provided 
for everything) and com- 
ponents. 

The actual assembly of the 
board was one of the easiest 
and quickest assemblies of PC 
boards I've ever done. The 
instructions were excellent, 
and the preformed leads and 
clear screening made every- 
thing fall together. One or 
two resistor locations were 
somewhat obscure, as they 
did not wind up in the gen- 
eral numeric order of most of 
the parts and required a little 
searching. But there were 
only a couple of these, and 
they were solved after a few 
seconds of searching, 

I popped the board into 

the computer and powered it 
up. Everything worked beau- 
tifully, the first time, and 
with no problems. I did have 
to make one minor modifica- 
tion to my VDM board 
(involving the bending of one 
pin on an IC) before I could 
initialize the screen. This was 
mentioned in the Z-80 
manual that S. D, Sales pro- 
vides (the kit manual), but I 
wanted to try it first to see if 
it was really necessary. They 
also mention a few modifica- 
tions and changes (all very 
minor) to other boards to get 
them to work with the Z-80. 
This is necessary in the case 
of the VDM because of the 
timing difference between the 
Z'80 and 8080 (the Z-80 is in 
most cases faster). However, 
it works finc; and it was 
really thoughtful of S. D. 
Sales to point all of these 
differences out, (This is an 
example of the thorough and 
complete altention to detail 
and documentation that is 
typical of everything involved 
with the kit,) It is one of the 
truly fantastic bargains still 
available on the hobby micro- 
computer market today* 

Speaking of fantastic bar- 
gains, S, D* Sales also makes a 
4K low power memory board 
for the Altair S-100 bus that 
is an equal bargain, in that it 
has the same quality parts, is 



equally well documentedi 
easy to huM, and costs [ess 
than the components to 
wire-wrap one. This is an- 
other wetl-designed, well- 
implemented piece of hard- 
ware. The board uses 4 reg- 
ulators and runs very cooL 
Fast memory chips and good 
design allow super fast board 
access time. (The board has 
no provisions for wait states 
but works perfectly with a 
Z-80 CPU running at almost 3 
MHz, which is far in excess of 
specs,) There are sockets for 



everything. Run to the near- 
est phone and order a dozen 
or so right away, before they 
come to their senses and raise 
the price to what ft should 
be. At $89,95 you are 
robbing them blind. 

The combination of the 
CPU and memory gives you 
the basis for a really super 
home brew computer with 
the addition of a pane), back- 
plane and power supply. This 
will gjve you a complete ma- 
chine, with a Z-80, 16K of 
reliable, low power STATIC 



memory, and full I/O for 
about the cost of a bare 
IMSAI or the same with video 
output capability for the cost 
(or slightly less) of an Altair 
(the case, panel, 8080 CPU 
and power supply and 
nothing else). 

In case this review seems 
too good to be true, you 
might remember the early 
days of 73 when I used to 
review ham radio equipment 
I never was overly kind to a 
manufacturer that didn't de- 
serve it and totd it like it was. 



! still feel the same today, 
and with the abundance of 
shoddy, overpriced computer 
equipment on the market (as 
well as a lot of very good 
equipment), these product re- 
views are an important guide 
as to what to buy or avoid. 
However, they should also be 
a useful guide p if honestly 
written, as to what is good 
and what is really a fantastic 
bargain. These boards from S. 
D, Sales definitely qualify for 
the category of fantastic bar- 
gain, ■ 




Manufactured & Gusrmiteed by 

MOR-GAIN 

2200T South 4th Street 

|jew«n^^orth, Kansas 66048 

<9 131 682-31 42 



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NOTES 

U Mocfe^s pnffiKed ' '* 'will be ^vgilsbYe 1/77. 

3. All mod^Ls abow« vrt turnished with crimp/iottter lugs. 

3. AM models cin b« furmshed with a SO 23^ femBJfr 
coaxial connector it additions F cost. The SO-239 nstej 
With the stBridord PL-2B9 mate coaxiol CBbIt ccnnector. 
To order thii fact or v instaUed optfeonj add the letter 'A' 
BfCtrthe modal number. Examplo: 40-20 HD /A. 

4. 7& meter models «i? factory tuned to reionate at 3950 
kHz- ISF] modeh are tactdry tMn«t to r?iqnate at 3800 
ItHzL SO Tnft«t modiil%afie factory tun«d to reianatf at 
38&0 kHz. Sh VSWR curves for odvt rrtonvK* dstt. 



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4&2D HD 

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S49.50 
59 50 

57.50 
55.00 
57.50 
66.50 
€6 50 
74.50 
74.50 
7650 



41/1.16 
40/1.12 
40/1 13 
44/1,23 
44/1 23 
4ft/ 134 
49/ 1,34 
60/140 



or contact your 



IFt/MlrtI 

36nO,9 
36/IO.a 
69/21-0 
66/30. T 
66/20.1 
66/20_T 
66/20 J 
66.^.1 
66,^30.1 
&mJO 
la:vorhe deeilet. 



NO TRAPS- HO COILS- 
NO STUBS- NO CAMCITORS 

MOR GAIiV HD DIP0LE5 . . • One half Tt^v l«n^ of 
cortventitmal half-wwt dipoles, * Multi-band> Multi- 
fr^qu^ncv- * Maximum otfici^erviY — nc traps, loadun^ caiii. 
or stubs. ■ FuUy aaembled and pre-tyned - no measuring, 
no cutting. • All swithir rated ~ 1 KW AM, 2,E <W CW or 
PEP SSB. • Proven performance - more than 15,000 have 
been delivered. » Purtnit uae of the full cap abi litres of 
today' ( 5- band Kcvn. * One feed line for operation rsn alf 
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(or the Ncnrifc u iMfll ct the EmtTa-Clm. Op. 

Mil 




ipJtVtH SAV Qlf 



from page f5 

bmn involved with, right from the 
start., 

The above is noi intanded as 
bragging; it is to put what I am about 
to write into perspective. (Note that 
there is no one involved with the 
ARRL or any other ham magazine 
with even a fraction of this back- 
ground. I have been at the b^rt of 
amateur radio for a long time now, 
and I think I understand how the 
pieces of the puzzle fit together. 

THE OVERALL PICTURE 

Before w^ c3n adepuate^ly tackle an 
immediate problem^ it is helpful to 
step back and take a Iohq look at the 
whole situation. This keeps us from 
being too confused by the trees to see 
the forest 

Amateur radio eitists because inter* 
naiionat allocations of frequenci^ 
have been set aside for it by the 
International Telecommunications 
Urtioni (ITUh an inlernational orcpn- 
izer of all radio frequencies and wire 
communkrattons. The United States is 
a member nation of the ITU and has 



. A l/lf2nlSDll 



EDITOR iAL SY WA YNE GRB£N 

agreed to abide by the rules which this 
body makes. 

At each (TU frequency conference, 
amateur radio has lost frequencies. 
Old-timers remember when 20 meters 
went from 14 to 15 MHz and 40 
meters from 7 to 8 M Hz, etc. 

1947 -^ATLANTIC CITY 

At this ITU conference, the major 
European nations got together with 
the U,S. and screwed the smaller 
nations of the world out of maior 
portions of the shortwave bands. 
Radio was still primitive in many of 
the smaller coun tries, and their repre- 
sentatives didn't realize how die world 
would change in the next few years^ 
The ITU at this time was firmly under 
the control of the U.S. 

1959 -GENEVA 

When this ITU conference came 
along, I had been editor of CQ Maga- 
line for four years. I was selected by 
the State Department as one of the 
official representatives of amateur 
fad*o, along with Huntoon of the 
ARRL. I had visited the ITU the 
previous year and gotten the inside 



story on what was in store for ama- 
teur radio at the '59 frequency confer- 
ence . . . and it was a truty aiarming 
story. When I found out what the 
positions were of some of the suf>- 
posed "friendly" countries, I called 
the general manager of the ARRL, 
Budiong, and offered to put aside any 
differences between the two maga- 
zines in order to present a united 
front. Bodlong^ in blunt four letter 
word«, said he didn't need any help 
from anyone. He personally had been 
running amateur radio for years ^tyd 
he would continue to run it . , . so go 
to hetL 

Wher^ I arrived at Geneva a short 
while before the ITU conference was 
to begin, I was issued a five foot shelf 
of position papers to wade through. 
Each of the countries at the confer- 
ence had proposed substantial changes 
in the frequency allocations in the 
3-30 MHz band, 

As I read through the positions of 
the various countries, 1 found that the 
predictions of the ITU hams had been, 
if anything, far too optimistic Vir- 
tually every country proposed serious 
cuts in the ham bands . . . some in 
favor of shortwave broadcasting, some 
for mobile services, some for short 
range commercial sen/ ices, etc. For 
Bxample, the Wireless Institute of 
Australia is one of the vvorld's more 
vocal ham groups^ with considerable 
strength in their couniry . . . yet the 
official position of AustraFia was to 
cut alJ ham bands down to 50 kHz 
widthl 



If thdt sounc^ dr^tic, our good 
Asian fr^ertds in India offkially pro- 
posed that all ham banth be cut to 20 
kHz - worldwide - and they seemed 
to have a good deal of support from 
several smaller countries. 

The mood of the hams at Geneva 
was glufn. True, the official U.S. 
position was to back the present ham 
allocations and ask for t)o changes^ 
But when I took the other detepates 
on the U.S. team out to breakfast^ 
lunch, dinner, coffee, etc., I found 
tt\at in virtu^ty aU caies, their con- 
fidential tnstriictions were to reflect 
any lo^es to their service to the 
nearest ham band. In other words, if 
they lost 50 kHz of allocation, it 
woufd be taken from a ham band to 
give them back the lost 50 kHz. This 
IS how the 14,350 to 14,400 segment 
of 20 meters was lost in 1947. 

The more foreign delegates I talked 
with, the more the conference looked 
like it would turn out to be a 
slau^ter f04^ amateur radio. Budlor^ 
WM there, hot he was asJeep much of 
the time. Nun toon was all tied up 
wUh entertaining visiting ARRL 
dig n iter ces and acting as secretary for 
a few committees* 

The U.S. strategy was to try to get 
all frequency allocations in the 3^30 
MHz segment postponed until the 
next ITU general meeting, scheduled 
for around 1969. This would pull the 
fat out of the fire on a lot of the 
shortwave allocations wher^ the U.S. 
had a disproportionate share. The U.Sp 

Continued on page 174 



95 



U 



Oayton W. Abrams K6AEP 
1 758 Comstock Lane 
San Jose CA 95124 



Title Your Pix 
With A Micro 



-- a useful SSTV accessory 



Upon the successful com- 
pletion of my SSTV 
picture generator program^ ^ I 
decided my next logical 
applications program would 
be one to title SSTV pictures. 
This project was selected 
since a majority of the pro- 
gramming was already written 
and debugged in my previous 
project. To accomplish this 
task, another piece of equip- 
ment was required. This piece 
of equipment is an SSTV scan 
converter. This equipment is 
quite interesting because it 
takes normal TV from a fast 
scan camera and converts it 
directly to SSTV. Since the 
TV is digitized in the process^ 
it Is quite easy to mix com* 
puter-generated video with 



the camera video. 

Prior to any system layout 
or programming, I decided 
upon a few ground rules 
which would affect the total 
project. These rules were: 
1, The entire program must 
be coresident in the SWTPC 
memory with my SSTV gen- 
erator program In 8K 
memory, 

2* Little or no hardware in- 
terface would be required* 
3. An MXV 200 Scan Con- 
verter would be used to gen- 
erate the SSTV.- 

The selection of the MXV 
200 Scan Converter was an 
obvious one — I had one In 
the shack. But even beyond 
that, It is the only scan con- 
verter available with pins on 




the main connector to pick 

up sync pulses and locations 
to mix the digital video. 
Other units could be adapted 
to this application (e.g,, the 
Robot 400^). 

As with my previous pro- 
gramming projects, the first 
steps required were to 
determine detailed pro- 
gramming specifications and 
then to draw flowcharts. 
Additionally, I decided to use 
a structured programming 
approach and modularize the 
program for ease in writing, 
debugging and making future 
changes- 

For anyone attempting 
such a project, this is an 
absolute necessity. As a result 
of these steps, I had the 
program totally operational 
in three weeks. Try and ac- 
complish the same project in 



FAST 
tCAH TV 

CAMERA 



A 



hardware logic design in such 
a time frame! This point de- 
monstrates how powerful 
microprocessors are, and how 
easily the SWTPC 6800 
System can be programmed* 

MXV 200 Scan Converter 

A fast scan camera is con- 
nected directly to the unit as 
shown in Fig, 1 . The first 
stage is used to shape the 
signal, and, in the second 
stage, the sync pulses are 
stripped from the fast scan 
video. The fast scan sync 
pulses are used to clock the 
IK shift register memory and 
to generate the slow scan 
sync. The shift register 
memory is then loaded at a 
stow scan rate into a 
d igi tal -to-analog converter 
and then into a slow scaji 
modulator. The important 
concept which is required for 
the whole thing to work is to 
slave the microprocessor to 
the scan converter. This was 
accomplished by attaching 
the horizontal and vertical 
sync signals to the SWTPC 
6800 Peripheral Interface 
Adapter (PIA) input port 
(pins 1 and 2). The output 
from the SWTPC 6800 was 
taken from two pins of the 
output PIA port {pins 4 and 
5). Two pins were required 
for output, one for back^ 
ground and the other for 
character dots- The whole set- 
up is shown In Fig, 2. 

The Software 

The programming routines 



Ultv 200 



iMpyT 



ifHC I 



ISEPARJkTIOH 



CO*tV 



IK 



i IF 



coutyttRs 



I 



C-LOCK 



BUFF Eli 



S¥I*C 



KORJZ vlflT 




SSTv 
liOfitlTOfl 



Fig, h MXV 200 Scan Converter block diagram. 



U 



36 



fiaST 
SCJLff TV 

CAMERA 



TV 



TV 
htONITOJ^ 



SCAN 

CQWVEflTCR 

UXV ZOO 



13 l£ 



14 f? 



VERT 



V ir 



mPifT 



CASSETTl 

IHTEHFACC 

SiHT&C AC-30 



CRT 

TERMINAL 

SVtfTPC CT-I0Z4 



Q. O O (3 O O 
■0 & O O 9 



HORIZ 



WHITE 



i 



-#— SStv 



PtA 
OiJTpUT 



etACK 



It 4 * 

PUl CARC» 



eeoo 




F/;^. 2 5c<7/7 converter Icomputer interface. 



used to generate the picture 
dots are similar to those used 
in my previous article. There- 
fore I will not discuss them in 
this article. 

However, I will discuss the 
algorithms I used for picture 
sync and other significant 
changes. I will first start by 
listing a few of the features of 
the titler program. 

L The titler program mixes 
up to 10 lines of SWTPC 
6800 generated characters 
with SSTV scan converter 
generated pictures* 

2. The SWTPC 6800 com- 
puter connects directly to the 
MXV 200 and Robot 400 
without a hardware interface. 

3. Ten different titles can be 
stored in the SWTPC 6800 
System's nnemory. 

4. Titler program can place 1 
line of 9 SSTV characters on 
any one of 9 locations of the 
SSTV picture, 

5. Titler program can mix up 
to ten different formats 
which consist of picture 
loop/number/line. 

6. Program includes a mini- 
monitor which allows the 
user to select the titler or 
generator program. 

7. The mini-monitor allows 
the user to select either 50 or 
60 Hz SSTV with the gen- 
erator program. 

8. The mini-monitor allows 
the user to select either white 
characters on a black back- 
ground or black characters on 
a white background. 

Fig, 3 shows the main line 
flow of the titler program 



along with the subroutine 
names and a memory map. 
The SYNCV and SYNCH sub- 
routines are two of the most 
important routines and 
function as follows: 

1. The program senses the 
PIA, bit 1 or 2, and waits for 
it to go positive. 

2. When the putse goes 
positive, the program then 
waits Tor the bit to go to 
ground and then branches out 
of the routine. 

As you can see, all that is 
now required is to count the 
horizontal sync pulses and, 
when the preprogrammed 
value matches the actual 
count, a line of slow scan 
characters are inserted into an 
SSTV picture. 

The TRANS subroutine 
functions like the SSTV gen- 
erator program. Fig. 4 con- 
tains a flowchart of this 
routine along with the 
memory counter locations 
used for storage of the 
various program constants. 

The loading of the picture 
dots IS similar to the gen- 
erator program with one 
major exception — the 
picture dots are loaded im- 
mediately after the trans- 
mission of a titler line or 
prior to the start of the pro- 
gram. These are convenient 
times to perform operations 
of this type, since the com- 
puter would only be waiting 
for sync pulses. 

Fig. 5 shows how the 
character dots are loaded into 
the picture dot buffer. The 
picture buffer consists of 126 




»TA*t 



sr 



r 



BUFAS 



Line. 



fORMAT 






-LMEU 



LOAD 
-FmTF 

-3LL 
-LND 
-StNCrt( 



SlfWCV 



I 



i St 



I 



PICTURE 



MEMORY 
LOC^TtOMtHEXl 

OOOQ 



(797 

IFOO 
IFFF 



mEMORY *i4P 



SSTV 

CH4H4C1EH 

GENEBATQR 

PROGRJIM 



SSTV 

UHE 

TITLEB 



«*tCTUI«:.&UFFfft- 



TABLE 

tSSTir ^f%\ 



VINl-iMMIItOA 

lastv %jm 



STNCH 







Fig. 3. Mam fine program. 



\ 



rffA&s 

STftffT 



I 



CLfl 



I 



*P1CT 

SiTM 
CPVT 12 



LDAA M 

^TAA 

C»*T IB 



I 



BIT i 



BSr^ 
Dot 

I* C^HAHI 



I 



GIWT 10 



LDAA 

X 

STAA 

CNT JB 




ihiL 
■stx 



W4lT FOft 
STi.l»T OF 
ftOBa 
STUC 

snsLsr 



TUHK 




Ffg, A Transmit picture tine of 9 characters. COUNT = actual 
count of numbers of transmits. CNT 18 = temp, byte storage 
for picture dots, CNT 10 - character courjt. CNT J J = Number 
of horizontal scan lines transmitted CNT 12 = temp, storage 
for index register, PICT - address of picture dots in memory, 

97 J3 



1790 no 00 00 

17A0 17 EA 27 
I7B0 BD 19 Al 
17C0 26 F^ 7F 
17D0 02 20 EO 
17E0 19 IC 20 
17F0 El AC B7 
ISOO 17 E9 ati 
ISIO 13 I4A 81 
1820 A7 00 OS 
1330 00 00 00 
13ii0 00 00 00 
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13S0 00 00 00 
1870 00 00 00 
1880 00 00 00 
1890 SD 5E 80 
18A0 SD 3A FG 
IdBO IS 86 8D 
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18D0 BO El AC 
ISEO FO CI 50 
18F0 00 00 00 
1900 00 00 00 
1910 09 7F 19 
1920 00 at( OF 

1930 19 00 oe 

19U0 31 27 20 
1950 55 27 2S 
1960 59 27 30 
1970 19 B7 19 
1380 59 Se k7 
1990 19 OD 39 
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1B30 50 B6 IB 
1B40 FB 27 02 
1B50 kP kl kU 
1G60 00 20 kl 
1B70 10 15 kC 
IBSO 55 52 1*5 
1B90 52 59 53 



SSTV TITLER PROGRAM 



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TRANSt-ATE/DOT TABLE 



bytes of data formatted as 
shown in Table L 

Each of the 9 bytes of 
picture data is duplicated 
for each scan line. Since the 
characters were formed by a 
5x7 dot matrix, the total 
number of scan lines is 2 x 7 
= 14, and the total number of 
bytes is 9 X 14 = 126, The 
picture dots are loaded from 
the same dot and translate 
table contained in the gen- 
erator program. This table is 
also listed for ease in program 
entry (sec Program A). 

Well, you now have a good 

98 



idea of how the program 
works. Let's discuss how to 
use the program. 

Operating The Program 

After you load the pro- 
gram into memory, you 
should first set locations 
A048 and A049 to the start 
address of the pro-am 1 FOO, 
When you type G, the TV 
monitor screen will be filled 
with a menu of the program 
options, ff you plan to also 
use the generator program 
with the mini-monitor, one 
programming change should 



IDOO 


dO 


1010 


DO 


1D20 


Uk 


1D50 


12 


IDifO 


00 


1D50 


88 


1060 


38 


1D70 


30 


1D80 


20 


1D90 


CO 


IDAO 


33 


IDBO 


FO 


IDCO 


3S 


IDDO 


20 


IDEO 


20 


IDFO 


SS 


lEOO 


F8 


lElO 


30 


lEZO 


70 


1E30 


SO 


lEIiO 


83 


1E50 


70 


lEGO 


33 


1E70 


F3 


lESO 


7 3 


1E90 


20 


lEAO 


00 



i*7 
D7 
SF 
19 
DO 
FO 
88 
78 
20 
AO 
88 

as 

70 
20 

as 
so 

FS 
OO 

as 

90 

88 
70 

00 
00 
00 
50 
3S 



kt 
&E 
56 
20 
20 

es 

FO 
80 
20 
90 
38 
83 
AO 
20 
38 
20 
F8 
70 
08 

Fa 

70 
S3 
20 

00 
A3 
A8 
20 



S5 
C5 
60 
27 
SO 
33 
FS 
30 
20 
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S3 
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90 
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20 
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as 

30 
10 
F8 
SS 
00 
00 
50 
20 
20 



5C 
CC 
7k 
2E 
88 
FO 
SO 
SO 
20 
SO 
CS 
80 
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as 

AS 
20 
00 
9S 
kd 
10 
03 
78 
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00 
AS 
20 
20 



63 
03 
7B 
35 
00 
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98 
70 
80 
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£0 
70 
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20 
02 
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00 
FS 
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20 
00 



6A 
DA 
82 
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00 
88 
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FS 
00 
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20 
10 
20 
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AS 
2 
QO 



71 
El 
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143 
20 
80 
80 
78 
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30 
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70 
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SS 
38 
08 
00 
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F& 
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EO 
20 
FS 
50 
50 
00 



78 
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90 
kh 
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80 
80 
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ao 

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SS 
70 
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88 
OS 
00 
70 
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08 
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00 
20 
20 
AS 
00 
70 



7F 
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97 
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38 
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33 
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70 
83 
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70 
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20 
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20 
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00 
20 
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00 
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S6 
FB 
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03 
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88 
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SD 
1^0 
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kd 

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88 
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MINI -HON I TOR PROGRAM 



IFOO CE 
IFIO 16 
1F20 2E 
1F30 07 
lFi*0 36 
1F50 20 
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1F70 OD 
1F80 Sl| 
1F90 kl 
IFAO Sk 
IFBO 30 
IFCO 20 
IFDO k5 
IFEO US 
IFFO kZ 



IF 

81 
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20 
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k^ 
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kB 
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BD 
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1*3 



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20 
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20 

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6E 

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£5 
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55 
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1^9 
1+S 
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00 
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00 
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00 
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55 
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kC 



BD 
Jh 
20 
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70 
20 
lA 
16 
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56 
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35 
kS 
5 k 
kS 



£1 
27 
DC 
20 
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CD 
53 
31 
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2E 
20 

53 



29 

kf 
GB 
00 
36 
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00 
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20 
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31 
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20 
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kC 
20 
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20 
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k9 
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31 
35 
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CE 
^5 
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20 
35 
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27 
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20 
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Program A. Object listings for SSTV titter program. 



be made at locations 0355-6. 
The address of 0000 should 
be changed to 1 FODO, This 
will cause the generator pro- 
gram to branch back to the 
mint-monitor program after 
the characters are trans- 
mitted. 

When the titler program is 
first executed, a menu will 
appear on the TV screen 
which will allow you to select 
a few program options. Photo 
t shows the mini-monitor 
menu. A brief description of 
each option follows: 
1 , Transmit SSTV. This 
option will cause the program 
to jump to the character gen- 
erator program. If the pre- 
vious change was made {ad- 
dress 355), the program 
would return to the mini- 
monitor when completed- 
2, Title SSTV* This option 
selects the litter program. 
When the option is com- 
pleted, control will be re- 



turned to the mini-monjton 

3. 60 or 50 Hz SSTV. This 
option modifies the program 
delay constants in the gen- 
erator program at location 
02 E3. 

4. Black on white titles* 
When selected, this option 
will place black letters on a 
white background. Four pro- 
gram constants are changed in 
the titier program. This is the 
normal condition when the 
program is first loaded. 
Normally character data is on 
PI A bit 4 and background is 
on bit 5. 

5. WTiite on black titles. 
When selected, this routine 
produces white letters on a 
black background in the titler 
program. The same four pro- 
gram constants are changed, 
character data is now on bit 
5, and background is on bit 4. 

Let's assume that you have 
selected the titler program 
option. The first instructions 




you see on the screen are 
shown in Photo 2. This 
routine is asking for an entry 
into the ASCII buffers of 9 
characters- Ten buffers can be 
loaded (0-9)- When you place 
an ASCII letter under the 
tetter B, the program will 
then jump to the next 
routine. 

The next routine is shown 
in Photo 3. This routine sets 
up the picture titles to be 
placed on the SSTV screen. 
Tiie entry is formatted by the 
program in the order 
LOOP/PICTURE/LINE. 

Up to ten of the above 
formats can be entered and 
the whole process will be 
terminated at the end of the 
tenth format, or when an 
ASCII letter is typed. 

The following is a des- 
cription of each format term: 
1- Loop entry. Reply should 
be 1 to 9* This entry controls 
the number of SSTV frames 
which will contain the picture 
title you select. If you reply 
with a zero, 255 loops will be 
assumed. In order to re- 
cover from this condition, 
you must put a 00 in COUNT 
at location 1 AAD, or wait for 
34 minutes of SSTV (255 
frames). 

2. Picture entry* This num- 
ber corresponds to the pic- 
ture buffer previously loaded. 
The reply should be to 9, 

3. Line entry. This reply 
selects the SSTV scan tine at 
which the title will start. The 
reply should be 1 to 9. The 
following is a list of reply 
versus scan line: 



Line no. 


Scan Line 


Oorl 


1 


2 


15 


3 


25 


4 


39 


5 


53 


6 


71 


7 


85 


8 


105 


9 


113 



This concludes the des- 
cription of how to use the 
program. Next, we'll discuss 
how to interface the SWTPC 
6800 to the scan converters. 

Interface Considerations 
As I stated earlier, the 




Photo h Mini-monitor routines. 



LOUD •UFFER8 •-9 



rm MACF 



TTTTTi 



THIS KOUTINE LOADS THE TEN 
BUFFERS WITH NINE CHARACTERS 
IN TNE EXAMPLE HY CALL SIGN 

INTO BUFFER S 



Photo 2, Titier pro-am option. 



LOAD LOOP-FICTURE-LINE 
IS BHTRY8 MAN 



THIS EXAMPLE SHOH8 HON TO LOAD 
LOOPy^PICTURE^LINE FORMATS UP 
TO TEN FORMATS CAN BE LOADED, 
IN TNE FIRST EKAMPLE#_TNO 
FRAMES OF PICTURE ZERO IS 

ON LINE S OF THE SSTM 



Photo 3, Entering (foading) picture titfes. 



9^ 



a 



Ii»^ 




Character Position (bytef I 



JIB tmiT 

or KICM 



n 



ACJtIfl 
OF ASCII 



I 



4^ DA A i 
ITAA 



] 



[HC 
CUTT 

CUT tT 



0F oois 

fUl IN 
















F=Oft uiUliS 
1 TO 7 
















' 


\ 








IIMC 


^ jH 




CM 


Tl 




^- % 




f"/^, 5. tojrf character dots in picture. Memory counters: CNT 
4 = ASCII character byte. CNT 5 = address of picture dots. 
CNT 7 - address of ASCII buffer, CNT 9 ~ character count. 
CNT 17 = address in picture buffer for dots. 



MXV 200 is the easiest unit 
to interface to since all the 

correcl signals are on the 
main connector. Table 2 lists 
the interconnection to both 
scan converters mentioned 
earlier. 

The Robot 400 interface 
requires some additional com- 
ments from those listed in 
Table 2. The white con- 
trol is obtained by removing 
US4 (74LS175) from its 
socket and bending pin 1 up. 
When installed on the board, 
a fine wire, #30, should be 



connected to a free pin on 
the main connector and then 
interfaced to the computer. 
The black control is not avail- 
able on the circuit board- 
However, pin 5 of 51 
(memory reverse switch) can 
be used. Remove the wire 
from +5 volts on pin 5 of 
switch SI and connect PI A 
bit 5 to it through a spare pin 
on the main connecton You 
may have to experiment 
somewhat in this area since i 
do not have a Robot 400 to 
attach to* You may have to 



location 

1B9A 
IB A3 



1 
1 



2 
2 



3 4 
3 4 

Table h 



5 
5 



6 

6 



7 
7 



8 
8 



9 

9 



Unit 


Signal 


PI A Ell 


Location 


MXV 200 


Ven Syrn: 


input 1 


pin 13 




Hori? Sync 


input 2 


pin 12 




White Com 


output 4 


pin 14 




Black Com 


output 5 


pin 17 


Robot 400 


Vert Sync 


input 1 


U44 pin 1 




Horii Sync 


input 2 


U44 pin 2 




White Cont 


output 4 


U54 pifi 1 




Black Cont 


output 5 


mem or V rev 
switch (SI J 



Table 2. 



experiment with the program 
constants to achieve the 
correct picture polarity. The 
program constants arc located 
at locations 1 B0D, 1 Bl B, and 
1B29, These constants will 
have to be changed also in the 

mini-monitor. 

If you decide to write 
about any questions, please 
include a seif*addressed 
stamped envelope for my 
return answer. 

This completes the 
functional description, 
operation and computer in- 
terface. I think a few words 
should be said re^rding the 
SWTPC computer in general. 
The titler program assumes 
that MIKBUG is used and the 
following routines are used: 
ElDl - Output one ASCII 
character; El AC — Input one 
ASCII character; E07E — 
Output a character string. 

Other system requirements 
are; 

1. The output PIA address is 
side A at location 7i address 
801C 

2. The input PIA is side B 



address 801 E. Prior to 
execution of the program, the 
PIA is initialized by the mini- 
monitor. If the user does not 
use the mini-monitor, the PIA 
must be conditioned in a 
similar manner for the PIA to 
function property. 
3, The SWTPC 6800 must 
have at least 8K of memory. 
I would like to thank Mike 
Tallent W6MXV for his tech- 
nical guidance with this pro- 
ject. Additionally, I would 
like to thank Clarence 
Munsey K61V for his help in 
providing data on the inter- 
facing to the Robot 400. ■ 

References 

' "SSTV Meets the SWTPC 
6800/' June 1977; 73 Magazine^ 
C,W. Abrams K6AEP. 

^ MXV 200 Scan Converter Unit 
can be obiainsd from Mike 
Tatlem W6MXV in kit or PC 
board alone, S35.00, contact 
Mike Tallent W6MXV, 6941 
Lenwood Way^ San Jose CA 
951 20, 

^ Robot 400 Scan Converter, 
Robot Research Inc., 7591 
Convoy Court, Sari Diego CA 
92111, 



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SS05 N. 22nd St. 
Ailmgioa VA 22205 



Mastering 
Network Operations 

- - everything you need to know ! 



Across the amateur 
bands there are many 
nets ... the rag chewers net^ 
the old timers net, YL net, 
and a host of others too 
numerous to describe. Some 
of these **networks" have an 
official purpose; others may 
exist for club activities or just 
friendly chitchat. It is 
through this article that I 
hope to open some eyes, so 
to speak, into network 
operationSi especially for 
those who misuse our net 
frequencies and/or have tittle 
understanding of the system. 
Many newcomers don't 
understand the networks as 
related to amateur radio, so it 
seems appropriate to begin by 
answering a frequently asked 
question: 

What Is a Network? 

Start by imagining a large 
circle which represents all 
amateurs on a certain fre- 
quency* A point in the center 
of this circle is the control 
station. This station asks for 
check-ins from hams within 
the circle and fogs them, 
stating whether they have 
traffic or are standing by. 
One by one he takes In call 
letters, and each station 
checked in establishes a tie or 
a communication bond with 
the net controL You can see 
that after a while a large net 
will form, which is actually 
many stations tied to a 
central point, or the control 
station. 

But what some hams don't 
understand is how important 
nets can be to the amateur 
fraternity. Take, for instance, 



military servicemen overseas 
who want to communicate 
with their loved ones back 
home> Without amateur nets, 
finding a particular city might 
be a long, tedious job. The 
same applies to maritime 
mobiles^ aeronautical 
mobiles, and persons with 
urgent medical or priority 
traffic who may very well 
have short time limits. 

Unless you're very lucky, 
finding a certain area may 
take hours, even with a 
crowded band! Going 
through a network can cut 
that down to just a few 
minutes. 

How, Then, Can 1 Get 
Involved In Net Operations? 

Becoming an active part of 
a network is not hard. The 
best place to start might be 
either the maritime mobile 
net or the intercontinental 
traffic net which meet every 
day on 14313 MHz. Come 
there and you can count on 
good advice about network 
operations from a real down 
to business net. Just listen for 
a while. Then, when you feel 
you're ready, jump in head 
first, 

Bui That's the Easy Part! 

Order is needed for the 

proper functioning of a 
network, it would be absurd 
to operate without a control 
station or rules. Networks 
need not only members and 
traffic to handle, but also the 
smoothness and order that 
rules and regulations provide. 
There are too many guys 
that leave cooperation up to 



the control. They figure, '*0h 
well, it's his job to keep 
order/' Ridiculous, isn't it? 
On Ihat basis, the net control 
spends half his time 
screaming for quiet so the net 
can operate. If you hear 
someone using improper 
procedures or causing inter- 
ference, why not move him 
off frequency and politely 
explain the rules to him? 

Soj you see, being a net 
member means more than 
checking in every once in a 
while and handling traffic. 
Each member should realize 
the purpose of the net and 
accordingly try to keep and 
enforce the rules. FCC 
chairman Richard Wiley told 
me in a recent interview that 
he considers amateurs "self- 
policing," On the average, I'm 
sure that's true. But the 
networks on 14,313 can be a 
pretty poor example of this! 
Just tune in some afternoon 
and grab an earful of 
unmodulated carriers, endless 
chains of CQs, and ear- 
splitting splatter from 
stations on nearby fre- 
quencies. You'll be lucky to 
hear the net control . - . and 
not only that, but the net 
control will be lucky to hear 
you ! 

On that note, I would like 
to present a network "primer 
for misunderstood pro- 
cedures" which, I hope, will 
help get the garbage off the 
nets. 

Checking In 

Sounds simple, doesn't it? 
The misuse of this maneuver 
is so incredible it might even 
qualify for a round or two in 



Ripley*s. 

Very basically^ the check* 
in is a method used to enter a 
net. But before you rush right 
into a network, take the time 
to listen a few minutes. This 
enables you to catch up with 
the control and follow what 
he is doing. Then if you wish 
to check in, listen for the 
controller's signal. He'll call 
for check-ins when the way is 
clear for more stations. Do 
not take it upon yourself to 
check in. It only interferes 
with the process of handling 
traffic. Also, there may be 
special check-in calls, such as, 
**Check-ins, maritime mobiles 
only!'* This means the con- 
troller only wants check-ins 
from maritime mobiles and 
for all others to stand by. 

After waiting for the 
controller's signal, quickly 
and clearly give him your 
callsign, always remembering 
to keep it short and sweet* 
The control has no time to 
listen to inane chatter (such 
as your name, what the 
weather is like, your rig, and 
so on)* 

After you transmit your 
callsign, the control will 
respond in some way or 
another. If no response is 
given, wait again for a check- 
in signal and try once more. 
Depending on your output 
power and location with 
respect to the net control, it 
may take several tries before 
he acknowledges. In any case, 
the control usually responds 
by repeating your callsign and 
then either asking for further 
check-ins or telling you to 
"call your traffic'' right away. 
When you're asked to uall 
your traffic, don't rattle on! 
just simply let the controller 
know who or where you wish 
to communicate with. (If you 
have no traffic, just say 
youVe standing by,) Control 
may now do any one of a 
number of things. For 
example, WB4EZM checks in 
anc| is looking for Los 
Angeles. Net control may tell 
him to call Los Angeles, or do 
the calling himself. If there is 
a Los Angeles station already 
on frequency, control will 
hook WB4EZM and L,A- 



104 



together, and they will decide 
what frequency to move to. 
Suppose there is no Los 
Angeles station on the fre- 
quency. Then control will ask 
WB4EZiVI if he would like to 
have his traffic listed. If the 
reply is "yes," then WB4EZM 
remains on frequency in 
hopes that L,A, will come up 
soon. If the reply is "no/* 
then the traffic is scratched 
from the controller's list and 
WB4EZM goes elsewhere* 

Checking into a net is one 
of the easiest things in the 
world. But some guys don't 
get the picture* 

In fact, the only person on 
a net to use the term ^'check- 
in" should be the controller, 
with the exception of stations 
with life-and-death, priority, 
or short- time traffic. But for 
most cases, don't call us, 
baby, we'll call you!!! 

The Contact 

Another one of those 
simple but misunderstood 
terms. Contact means that 
your station is on frequency 
and you would like to 
contact him. For instance, 
WB4EZM tunes into the net 
and hears Los Angeles check 
in and stand by on the fre- 
quency. At a convenient 
break in the controller's 
transmissions, WB4EZM says 
"contact/' and he is hooked 
up with L.A. accordingly. 
Remember: Use "contact'' 
only when you know for sure 
that the station you want is 
on frequency. Some hams use 
"contact" as a means of 
getting into a net, because the 
controiter will usually 
respond to it immediately. 
They'll call for a station that 
Isn't there and then say, "Oh, 
well, I thought 1 heard him!" 
This practice is unfair, and 
now many net controls will 
refuse to list these stations. 

The Recheck 

Not many problems with 
this one* It means, ''1 have 
moved off frequency with a 
station and contact was not 
established." In this case, the 
net control would ask you to 
call your station again and, if 
you receive no reply, give you 



the option of watting on the 
frequency in case he returns 
or another station in the same 
area pops up. Losing a station 
could have been caused by 
heavy QRNf, QRN, or other- 
wise nasty band conditions. 
So^ you see, a net not only 
provides a method of linking 
statJonSp but also a way of 
re-linking them if they don*t 
hook up. 

The Checkback 

Easy to understandi but 
consistently confused with 
the recheck. Checkback 
means, "I have moved off 
frequency with a station. 
Contact was established, the 
traffic passed, and 1 would 
now like to check back into 
the network.** The misuse of 
this term is pure laziness. 
Recheck is used for check- 
back, and vice versa, which 
leads the net control off 
track. Understanding net 
language is a necessity! 

The Check*out 

Rarely used, but never- 
theless existent. Looking at it 
tells you the meaning: 
simply, "1 wanna get the heck 
outa here." Although a polite 
way of leaving a net, its rare 
use stems from it almost 
being a time-waster. As a net 
control, 1 can honestly say 
that the absence of this term 
hasn*t hampered operations. 
If you're not there, you're 
not there! 

Relays 

Without relay stations, 
efficiency would be greatly 
reduced. At the QTH here in 
northern Vir^nia, I am 
totally unable to copy ones, 
twos, some threes, a few 
fours, eights, and nines. Skip 
conditions just won*t allow it 
on 20 meters during the 
daylight hours. Therefore, I 
need stations to pick up those 
I cannot copy . , . relay 
stations. For example, I 
would use a station in Florida 
to receive traffic from up 
north and pass it along to me. 
Networks require the 
cooperation and patience of 
ail their members to coor- 
dinate relay activities. But 




that isn't the only use for 
relays. Many times a station 
will try to break the net 
because he cannot hear the 
net control. 

If you hear someone 
needing a relay, you can be 
the one to help. First, make 
sure the net control can hear 
you. You'll know whether or 
not he can from previous 
conversations. Next, ask the 
breaking station to stand by. 
Then at an appropriate break 
in the controller's trans- 
missions, transmit "relay/* If 
control acknowledges, he will 
tell you to pick up the traffic 
from the station unable to 
copy him. One word of 
warning: Many net con- 
trollers will refuse to list 
stations who break the net 
and are able to copy control. 

Courtesy To the Net Control 

A controller has an 
incredible chore coordinating 
some 50 to 100 {or more) 
stations. And the only reward 
is the satisfaction of running 
a goodp smooth neL Efficient 



operation requires the help of 
all members- Don't leave it all 
up to the control* Here are 
some good guidelines to 
follow: 

1, Politely ask all stations 
operating in the immediate 
vicinity of the net frequency 
to move elsewhere. If 
someone won't move, don't 
get nasty about it, just leave 
them be, and eventually 
they'll go away, 

2, Aid the net control as a 
relay station, whenever 
possible, 

3, Follow net procedures to 
the tetter, and explain the 
rules to those who don*t> 

4, Become active! Use that 
phone patch where it is most 
needed! 

The Three Cs 

Well, here it is! The grand 
finale, and maybe you've 
already guessed my point- lt*S 
called the three Cs of 
network operation: 
1, Courtesy - Always be 
courteous to the net control. 



105 



fellow members, and every- 
one else in the amateur 
society. Where does everyone 
else fit in? Just lake a look 
* , , when you ask a station to 
move away from the net 
frequency, do it politely! 
Don*t give the attitude that 
the nets want to take over 
everything within 5 kHz of 
the net frequency. Simply 
explain thai the net needs 
breathing room to operate 
properly. Networks are a 
service, not a burden. 
2, Cooperation — Try to gel 



THIS YEAR . . . 



along well with the controller 
and follow the rules. If you 
check into a net, say you're 
standing by and mention you 
have a phone patch, The net 
control could throw anything 
your way! Be prepared to 
help out in any way possible, 
whether it's acting as a relay 
or handling traffic. 
3, Commitment - Commit 
yourself to a net. It doesn*t 
have to be every day. It can 
even be once a week! Nets 
need stations to handle 
traffic. Wouldn't it be great if 



you could check into a net, 
ask for a particular city or 
state, and hook up immed- 
iately? This is entirely 
possible if more people who 
have the time would at least 
monitor the nets for possible 
traffic! 

1 ceruinly hope you won*t 
take this article lightly. Get in 
there 1 Find a net! Do your 
part! Here's a good way to 
get started: 

The Maritime Mobile Service 
Net 
14313 kHz (20 meters) 



7 days a week, starling 
around 1700 GMT. 

The Intercontinental Traffic 

Net 

14.313 kH? (20 meters) 

7 days a week, with two 

operation times: 

1 , Morning — from band 
opening to around noon- 
Eastern time, 

2. Evening — following 
maritime mobile net and 
continuing to band closing. 
Note: Sometimes the IC net 
will not operate on 
Sundays. ■ 



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VISA 



jx^'M\ tharga 



^ 



You asked for it! 
A $70.00 digital muitimater kit 

Now there's just no excuse for not 

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106 



Harry L, Fisli K41FH 

POBqx 15B7 

Avon Park FL Z3825 



Try A Trapped Dipole 



-- save copper and coax! 



Often ihe need arises for 
a permanent low cost 
antenna. A dipole or inverted 
vee is a good choice. They are 
easy to install and cheap to 
build* One of the disadvan- 
tages of such antennas is that 
they are only usable on a 
single band, unless they are 
fed with an open feedline and 
an antenna tuner. 

Most traps used in amateur 
radio nnuUiband antennas are 
made of a lumped inductance 
and capacitance in parallcL I 
tried to overcome this- 

By placing a trap 32 feet 6 
inches from the feed point, a 
current maximum will occur 
at 7200 kHz. With the correct 
wire length on the outside 
end of the trap, the antenna 
can also show current 
maximum at the feedpoint 
for 3900 kHz. In both cases, 
the dipole functions as a half- 
wave dipole* 

Why not add another 
antenna under the existing 80 
and 40 meter wire, fed at the 



same feedpoint, with another 
trap tuned for 21300 kHz? 
An outside wire of the cor* 
rect length will give current 
maximum on 80, 40, 20 and 
15 meters, all functioning as a 
half wave dipole. 

With the help ofmyXYL, 
1 came up with this antenna. 
The information for con- 
struction follows- I hope it 
will do as well for you as 
mine does for me! 

The dimensions given here 
are resonant at 3.9 MHz, 7,2 
MHz, 143 MHz and 213 
MHz, For 40 meters it's 160 
turns^ for 15 meters, 55 
turns. Number 12 magnet 
wire is wound on a 1/2 inch 
rod, close wound. The coil is 
removed from the 1/2 inch 
rod and placed inside the 1/2 
inch PVC pipe. 

The PVC pipe is cut to 18 
inches for 40 meters^ 10 
inches for 15 meters. The 
PVC is then placed inside the 
7/8 Inch ID, 1 inch OD 
aluminum tube. The alumi* 



ALUN 




ffg^ h 



2 III 



59 TUMt$ 



laweTERS 



iio ruRM$ 



40iirrtHs 



-L 



^m- 



_ff^^ ^m If 1 ^ i ip ^^|P^i ^ "^f^f^ip^F^p^wH^*'i^^^'"^* ^i H i^i^» '^>^ ^ *"^i ^ ^*'^' * ^ »^ ^ 



■ "■l ^^rw'^rWWiO f^y Hf^ 



num is cut to 16-1/2 inches 
for 40 meters, 8-1/2 inches 

for 1 5 meters. 

Drill a hole in the center 
(ends) of eight 1/2 inch PVC 
caps, and mount stainless 
steel eye bolts on them. (Cut 
off the eye bolts as short as 
possible, so they will not go 
into the PVC tube.) Now drill 
a hole to fit the #12 magnet 
wire below the eye bolt in 
each end cap. See Fig. 4. 

Cement one end cap onto 
the PVC tube after bringing 
the end of the coil wire 
through the small hole* 
Secure a tin solder lug on one 
end of the aluminum 
tube^ as shown in Fig. 3, with 
a pop rivet or small screw. Do 
not use aluminum or copper 
for the solder lug. Slide the 
aluminum tube over the PVC 
with the solder lug end first, 
and solder a jumper from the 
lug to the coil wire as close to 
the PVC cap as possible* 



You are now ready to tune 
the traps. The traps were 
adjusted to frequency 
through the use of a grid-dip 
meter (checking on a receiver 
for accuracy). The coil can be 
changed quite easily if an 
extra turn or two is put on 
for adjusting purposes. The 
coil can also be wound with 
spacing and compressed or 
extended to get the traps 
exactly on frequency. Tune 
to 7.2 on 40 meters. Tune to 
21 3 on 1 5 meters. 

After the tuning is com- 
pleted, the end cap can be 
cemented on. The two wires 
sticking out of the end caps 
are to be soldered to the 
antenna wires. 

My antenna is supported 
in the center about 32 feet 
high and 1 feet at the ends. I 
show an swr of 1.2 to 1 on 
3-9, 13 to 1 on 7-2 p 1.3 to 1 
on 143 and 1.2 to 1 on 213. 
The CW bands can be worked 
with the swr less than 2 to 1 
on all CW bands. 

The overail length is 106 
feet, and it can be installed as 
an inverted vee in a lot less 
than 90 feeL ■ 



Parts List 

PVC cement 

8 1/2" PVC caps 

56" of 1/2'^ PVC pipe 

1 balun, 1:1 

4 ceramic insulators 

135' of antenna wire 

50" of 1" aluminum tubing (a 

discarded lawn chair wHI do) 

80" of #12 magnet wire 



.5/6 i« |D^_ , — -. 



litmcH PVC 



,7/aiM oo_ 



mm - 4Q 

ID«I - IS- 



METERS 



M£TERS 





_, 


ALiJHIflUM TUBE 




Tf^m ID 


llll.ClD- 



l«l/2 IN.- 40 
• 1/2 in - 19 



UETE^S^ 



JlCTEgrS 



SECUM: a TlK S€I.{>ER 
LU& ON Oft£ EHD 
ftfOTE* 00 wot USf 



Fig. 3. 




' " _DCR LU5 Cai et CUT ttlAOE} 
'%i «,TiN CJ.N ALU«f mutt AKD 
■s* HULL WOfin IGiliWST £ACH 



Ff'g. 2. Don't forget to leave 2'* on each end of each coiL 



Fig. 4. The colt will expand to make a nice fit inside the PVC 
tube. The aluminum fits snu^y over the PVC, and the cap rims 
help hold the aluminum tube in place. It afl makes a very nice 
looking assembly. 



107 



Jossf Bernard K2HUf 

77 W. J 5th SL 

NewYorkNY IQOll 



Liberate 



Your Wilson HT 



-- who needs nicads? 



I am sure that mariy hams 
will agree with me that 

the Wilson HTs are aniong the 
best buys on the market. 
Their performance /price ratio 
is significantly greater than 
that of many other units 
intended for the same pur* 
pose. There are, however, 
several features which those 
other units offer which the 
Wilson could benefit by, and 
one of the most valuable is 
the ability to operate from a 
power supply other than the 
self-contained nicads. 

As a ham with a large 
investment in low band 



equipment and getting deeply 
involved in slow scan (more 
money), I cannot afford both 
a base and a portable/mobile 
2 meter rig and must make 
my Wilson perform both 
functions. Since Vm a rag 
chewer by nature and the 
Wilson *s nicads are useful 
only until their charge gives 
out, the ability to operate my 
HT from an external dc 
power supply became a 
necessity if I were to be able 
to remain on the air for any 
extended period of time. 

While it is possible to 
access the battery pack 



TOftiG 



DC m n 



« BLACK 
-V Li AD 
TO ftie 



^ 



CHARGING! 
EOPTIONAUI 



[I 






V^ 



RED LEAD 



IDrODt 
UMCUyOE IF HOT 
IN DC 5tJPPLrt 



«J 



-BftTlEttY 



♦BATTERY 

RAIL 



Fig, I. Rear view affront half of Wilson case (not to scale). 



through the fitting at the top 
of the rig (only when the unit 
is turned on), this is both 
physically inconvenient and 
electrically unsound. There 
had to be another way. 

One solution to my 
predicament was proposed by 
a friend who owns two 
battery trays for his own 
Wilson. He has taken the 
second tray (sans batteries), 
drilled a small hole in its base, 
and connected wires to the 
interna! rails which normally 
carry power from the 
batteries to the electronics. 
Outside his Wilson, these 
wires are attached to a suit- 
able dc supply^ and he is in 
business. 

With all due respect^ I find 
several drawbacks to this 
system. First, when you want 
to switch from the nicads to 
external power, it is necessary 
to remove the one battery 
tray and insert the other. This 
can be somewhat incon- 
venient if you are in a big 
hurry or want to travel lighL 

Second, with those wires 



coming out of the bottom of 
the rig, its equilibrium 
becomes rather unstable and, 
while I know from experience 
that the Wilson is capable of 
sustaining a fall of reasonable 
distance, I prefer to verify 
this knowledge as infrequent- 
ly as possible. The only safe 
way of using this arrangement 
is with the rig lying on its 
back — somehow inelegant as 
well as inconvenient. Con- 
sequently, I tried a different 
approach. 

I went about adding 
external dc capability to my 
Wilson by installing a jack in 
the side of the transceiver. 
The wiring is such that, 
normally, the rig functions as 
usual frgm the interna! 
nicads. When the plug from 
the power supply is inserted, 
however, the batteries are 
disconnected from the rest of 
the rig, and dc from the out- 
side world flows directly into 
the Wilson. An obvious 
advantage of this setup is that 
you never have to fuss with, 
or even consider^ a second 
battery tray. A less obvious 
advantage is that while you 
are running the HT from out- 
side power, you can be 
charging its batteries at the 
same time. More about the 
use of a second jack for 
charging purposes later. 

Installation of the jack(s) 
is easy — all you really re- 
quire is th€ nerve to puncture 
the hide of the HT. By no 
means should the hole be 
made with a drill — one slip 
or ill-timed sneeze could 
wreak havoc with the rig and 
your waltetl Instead^ start the 
hole with a pencil tip sol- 
dering iron and go only far 
enough to just begin to 
penetrate the inside wall of 
the case. The hole may then 
be enlarged with a tapered 
reamer until it is the right size 
to snugly accommodate the 
jack. It may lake several days 
to work up the courage to do 
this, but it's worth working 
yp to and once you've done 
jtf you'll find it hard to resist 
doing it again. 

The jack I used is an 
enclosed miniature 1/8" 
normally-closed phone type 



108 



(Radio Shack 274-296), 
Properly located, two of 
these will fit comfortably 
within the Wilson. The 
obvious — and probably only 
— place to install the jack is 
on the right-hand side of the 
unit (as se^n from the front) 
in the front half just above 
the battery pack. 

There is plenty of room if 
you pay attention to one or 
two details. Allowance should 
be made to cfear I he channel 
selector switch which will be 
just above the jack, and lo 
clear the metal brace which, 
it would appear^ serves to 
keep you from crushing the 
HT in your grip if you 
squeeze I he PTT lever too 
enihusiasttcally. Careful 
planning will enable you to 
pinpoint the correct spot. 

In working on my rig, I 
tread a little too cautiously 
and placed the dc jack a bit 
on the low side, probably 
because I was trying to avoid 
conflict with the trimpot for 
my touchtone pad* Even sO| I 
still have room for the 



addition of a charging jack^ 
so, being forewarned, you 
should have no difficulites at 

alL 

The unswitched terminal 
of the dc jack {see Fig. 1) is 
connected to the ground rail 
(black wire) of the battery 
tray slide. The hot lead (red, 
from the other rail) is broken 
and connected across the 
other two terminals of the 
jack. The battery side of this 
red lead should be connected 
to the switched terminal. This 
way the internal current flow 
will be normal when no plug 
Is inserted, but insertion of 
the dc plug will break the 
battery line and allow current 
from the external suppiy 
through the rig's electronic 
innards. 

Similarly, a second jackj 
for battery charging from the 
outside, may be installed 
ahead of the first and wired 
the same way. Normally, the 
HT will operate as usual, but 
with a plug inserted in the 
charger Jack, the batteries wilt 
be placed in parallel with the 



charger. While it is not 
recommended that the Wilson 
be operated from its, or any 
other, battery chargeri with 
this arrangement is is possible 
lo charge the batteries while 
operating from the external 
dc supply at the same time. 

Incidentally, the power 
supply which J use was 
adapted from the one de- 
tailed by WA8WVF in the 
September, 1976, issue of Z3L 
My supply uses smaller power 
lab type transistors, available 
from Radio Shack (276-636), 
which seem to function very 
comfortably at the level re- 
quired by the Wilson, 

An oui'of-tolerance 1 5 V 
zener together with a diode in 
the line (for both slight volt- 
age dropping and reverse 
pofarfty protection; install 
such a diode at the jack if 
your power supply doesn't 
incorporate one, to save your 
nicads unnecessary grief) feed 
my Wilson about half a volt 
more than it normally gets 



from its battery pack, and the 
rig has been operating very 
happily and successfully in 
this fashion for a number of 
months. 

My thanks loW2YHXand 
WA2UAQ for their inspira- 
tion and urging on to better 
things, and best of luck to 
you in making this simple, 
but extremely worthwhile, 
modification, ■ 



chamnel 

5£L 




OC JACK 



I 



Ffg. 2. Rigfjt side of Wilson MOl-SM showing approximate 
location ofdcjad^ (not to scale). 




The NEW NYE 
"Matchmaker!" 
VIKING MB II 



Antenna Impedance-matching Network 
assures maximum perfectly matched 
power to your antenna! 



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(wfth Balun) S315 




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^Constant SWR monitoring,'*' Precision tuning of final amp.* Harmonic suppression. 

* Receiver input impedance-matching.* Maximum power transfer to antenna. *Con- 
tinuous frequency coverage 1.6 to 30 MHz. * Precision tuning of any wire Vs 
wavelength or longer, with SWR of 1:1. 

MB II features: 

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IV4 






109 



Novice 



Antenna Specials 



-- tips for that first antenna 



WUliam E. Hood W2FEZ 
116 W. P^rk SU 
Albion NY 14411 



When a Novice receives 
his first license and is 
r^dy to get on the air, there 
comes the final porlioo of the 
volunteer examiner's respon- 
sibility which many either fail 



V^ WAVE 



to realize or completely for- 
get. Here is a newly-Hcensed 
individual whose knowledge 
of arnateur radio is largely 
theoretical — one for whom 
the minor technicalities of 
getting on the air can present 
a major stumbling block un- 
less thai individual who got 
him into this in the first place 
Is still with htm, ready to help 



H 







yZ «MLVE lit FEET - 4«e/r4*if 



Fig. f, Dipole, 



him over the few pitfalls in 

the process of getting started- 

To the newly-licensed 

Novice, especially if he is a 
young person J the task of 

erecting his first antenna can 
be a formidable one. Then, if 
he makes one small mistake 
here or thercj mistakes that 
the books don't always warn 
him against, he may be in for 
disappointment and discour- 
agement. This articlei theni is 
written with the beginner in 
mind, in hopes that it might 
help him to do the job right 
and start him out with an 
antenna that will properly 
introduce him to a truly 
rewarding hobby. 

1 1*5 not nice to fool 
Mother Nature. She has her 
rules whichi if obeyed, will 
serve you well and, if igfiored, 
will trip you up. An antenna 



is a piece of equipment all in 
itself. It must change the 
alternating currents generated 
by your transmitter into 
radio waves; it must change 
radio waves into alternating 
currents from which the 
receiver can then recover the 
inteiligence. So long as the 
rules are met, you can make 
your antenna any way you 
like. 

In part, the rules are: The 
antenna must run in a 

straight, or nearly straight, 
tine. It must be resonant. It 
should be suspended as hi^ 
above the ground as possible, 
and as clear as possible of 
substantially large, grounded 
objects. While there are many 
antennas that are exceptions 
to these rules, they apply to 
any kinds of antennas that 
are relatively easy to install 
and tune. 

What Kind of Antenna Do 
You Want? 

The vast majority of 
antennas used by amateurs 
transmitting on Novice fre- 
quencies are distributed 
through two classes: di poles 
and endfed wires. 

The Dipole 

A dipole is made of two 
pieces of wire, strung end-to- 
end, With the coax feedline 
connected in the center. The 
overall length of the com- 
bined two pieces of wire must 
be one half wavelength. The 
exact size may vary with the 
kind of wire you use, the 
heigbt of the antenna above 
the ground, the conductivity 
of the ground in your loca- 
tion, and a few other things. 
Here are some sizes that will 
get you into the right ball 
park. (Note: these values are 
aimed at the centers of the 
Novice bands.) 



80 meters 


1 2S' 7" 


40 meters 


65^ 5^^" 


1 5 meters 


22' VA** 


10 meters 


XW IW 



It is best if the antenna is 
run in a straigtit line, al- 
though some small amount of 
angle between the two halves 
can be tolerated. If you run 
the two halves side-by-side, as 



110 



one Novice almost did| it 
simply won*t work! Support 
your wires with any strong 
irisulating cord from trees^ 
poleSj buildings^ or whatever 
happens to be handy. Fasten 
the cords to the antenna with 
glass, plastic, or ceramic in^ 
sulators. In the center^ use 
another insulator similar to 
those used at the ends. 

Feed a dipole with 75 
Ohm coaxial line. Type 
RG-59/U is adequate. You 
can use RG-1 1 /U also, but it's 
bulky and expensive. Wrap 
the coax around the center 
insulator, tape it in place, and 
connect the conductors, one 

each antenna wire. 



The Inverted Vee 

The inverted vee is a 
variation of the dipole that 
has provided excellent results 
for a great many hams. Un- 
like the dipole, the inverted 
vee is supported in the center, 
with the ends staked in place 
close to the ground. At this 
pointj I will caution you to 
have the ends of the wires 
high enough that your 
neighborhood kid can't reach 
them. Otherwise, he'll be sure 
to grab them when youYe 
transmitting, to the tune of a 
couple of thousand volts. 

The angle between the two 
halves of an inverted vee 
should be between 90^ and 
120 for best results. Tire vee 
form factor changes the 
length needed to resonate 
your antenna. Here are the 
total lengths required for the 
Novice bands: 



80 meters 


124' 7" 


40 meters 


64' 11" 


1 5 meters. 


21' 11^' 


to meters 


1 6^ 6" 



The inverted vee should be 
fed with 50 Ohm coax. Use 
type RG'58/U. RG^8/U can 
also be used, but it is more 
bulky and expensive. 

The Endfed Wire 

The endfed wire is the 
simplest of the antennas to 
erect, and can be the answer 
if your shack is on an upper 
floor. However, it requires a 
tuner, and can be a stinker to 
tune up for the first time. 



Also, if it isn't tuned up right, 
it can produce stray rf volt- 
ages floating around your 
shack and showing up where 
least welcome. 

The length of an endfed 
wire is the most tolerant of 
mistakes (among the three 
antennas discussed here). In 
fact, an experienced amateur 
can load up almost any ran- 
dom length of wire. Since it is 
brought directly to your 
shack, there is no feedline as 
such. The tuner can be 
connected to the antenna 
with either 50 or 75 Ohm 
coax, but not both. 

For a tuner ^ you can use 
the ''Lunch Box*' tuner de- 
scribed in the November/ 
December, 1975, issue of 13. 

Bring the coax from your 
antenna, or tuner, through a 
coaxial lightning arrester, a 
low pass filter (if you use 
one), and a reflected power 
meter to the antenna relay or 
transceiver. Bring a wire from 
the lightning arrester, and a 
vrire from each piece of 
equipment, to a common 
terminal in your shack, which 
will be your prime ground 
terminal. Don't depend on 
the shield in the coax for this 
connection. Run a heavy 
conductor from your prime 
ground terminal to your final 
earth-ground connection (a 
water pipe, driven rod, or 
several square feet of buried 
screen). A good ground is 
essential for the best oper- 
ation of your station. 

How to Tune Your Antenna 

Generally, most antennas 
will work OK if cut from the 
basic antenna formulas, or if 
cut carefully to the sizes 
given in the preceding para- 
graphs. OnceJn a v^hile you 
will find one needs further 
matching. We call the process 
"pruning." If the reflected 
power meter indicates a 
standing wave ratio of 2 or 
higher, you should prune the 
antenna. If the swr is 1.5 or 
less, leave it alone. Between 
1,5 and 2^ it's your decision. 

It's a good idea to secure 
the help of an experienced 
amateur if you prune your 
antenna. With a little care and 



1/^ WAVE 




LJ t/2; WAVE IN FEET - 464/f MHJ 



Fig, 2. Inverted vee. 



common sense, however, you 
can do it yourself, and there's 
no time like the present to 
learn. You will need a grid 
dip meter. This can be bor- 
rowed from a local ham, if 
you can locate one, or it can 
often be located through a 
ham club. You will also need 
a receiver with a fairly accu- 
rate dial. Never depend on 
the dial calibrations of a grid 
dip meter unless it comes 
from a commercial lab. Even 
then ba ready to question it. 

The swr of the antenna 
can give you some idea which 
way you will have to go. If it 
is lowest at the high end of 
the band, the antenna is too 
short; if it is lowest at the low 
end of the band, the antenna 
is too long. To find out 
exactly how much to change 
the length, you must find out 
just where the antenna is 
resonant. That's where the 
grid dipper comes in. 

Let*s first consider the 
process of pruning a dipole. 
Support the dipole, stretched 
out \x\ a straight line, at a 
height where you can easily 
reach it. Remove the coax 
and short the two halves to- 
gether. Hold the grid dip 
meter with the coil just 
touching, but not making 
electrical contact with, the 
center of the antenna wire. 
Very slowly tune the grid dip 
meter through the suspected 
resonant frequency of the 
antenna. You will notice a 
pronounced dip in the meter 
reading. The bottom of this 
dip is at the resonant fre- 
quency of the antenna. Slow- 
ly move the coil away from 
the antenna, tuning back and 
forth over the resonant fre- 



quency until the dip is barely 
noticeable. When the meter 
reads at the lowest point, it is 
tuned to the antenna's 
resonant frequency. Now 
tune your receiver until you 
zero-beat the meter *s oscil- 
lation, and read the fre- 
quency from the receiver's 
dial. 

If you are checking an 
inverted vee, leave it in place 
and connect a turn or two of 
wire across the end of the 
coax. Couple the coil of the 
grid dip meter into this link, 
and spot the resonant fre- 
quency as in the preceding 
paragraph. 

Once you have the res- 
onant frequency spotted, 
you're almost there. Now you 
must adjust the antenna 
length to make it resonant 
where you want it. If the 
resonant frequency is too 
high, the antenna must be 
lengthened; if it is too tow, 
the antenna must be short- 
ened. J ust how much depends 
on how far off the antenna's 
frequency is from where you 
want it. Find the difference 
between the antenna's res- 
onant frequency and the 
center frequency of the band 
you are using. Multiply that 
difference by the factor given 
below: 



80 meters 
40 meters 
15 meters 
10 meters 



0.4 
0,11 
0.01 
0.007 



The result is the amount, in 
inches, that must be taken 
from or added to your an- 
tenna. Remove or add exactly 
half this amount to each half 
of the antenna, and recheck 
swr. If you did it right, you 



111 



1/2 WAVE.' 



END -FED WIRE 




mSUUPFOR 



TO 

*WT1NNA 

R£L*,¥ 



EVERVTHIWG FROM HCRE 
D0W4y| SHCKiUQ BE U^ED 
WITH mt ANTENNA SYSTEM 



TO 

TRANSMIT 

TO 

RECEIVER 



PfllME 

GF^DUND 

TEttlVllNAL 



Fig* 3, Endfed wire. 



will find a tremendous im- 
provemenL 

Example: Charlie Brown 
finds his antenna is actually 
resonant at 6575 kHz. He 
wants it resonant at 7125 
kHz. 7125 - 6575 =550,550 
X 0,n = 60.5. Charlie cuts 
SQVa inches from each half of 
his antenna J and iL will res- 
onate at 71 25. The discrep- 
ancy has been exaggerated to 
better illustrate the principle. 

Example: Linus finds his 
antenna is resonant at 3875 
kHz, and he wants it ai 3725- 
3875' 3725 = 150. 150x0,4 
= 60. He adds 30 inches to 
each half of his antenna, and 
it's resonant at 3725, Again, 



the amount of difference 
shown is more than you Ye 
likely to come up against. 

Tuning An Endfed Antenna 

There isn't much need to 
adjust the length of an endfed 
antenna, since the tuner 
makes up for that. If you've 
never done it before, you 
may want to tune your trans- 
mitter into a dummy load 
first. This isn't absolutely 
necessary, however. A grid 
dip meter can help, but you 
can gel by without it. If you 
don*t have something to read 
swr, g^t it. 

With a grid dip meter: 



Connect the antenna to 
the tuner, disconnect the 
transmitter, and short the 
coax connector. Set the grid 
dip meter lo the center of the 
band you are using spotting 
the friquency on your re- 
ceiver. Couple the grid dip 
meter into the tuner and 
adjust the capacitor until you 
get an indication on the 
meter. If the meter seems to 
be approaching an indication 
with the tuner capacitor fully 
meshed, add a turn to the 
tuner coiL If the meter seems 
to be approaching an indica- 
tion with the tuner capacitor 
all the way out, remove a 
turn from the tuner coiL 

WItlmut a grid dip meter^ or 
after finding resonance with a 
grid dip meter: 

Reduce Lhe drive level in 
your transmitter as far as you 
can and still get rf out, fAt 
this point it helps if the trans- 
mitter has already been tuned 
into a 50 Ohm dummy load.) 
Set the swr meter for re- 
flected power. Tune the 
capacitor in the tuner for a 
dip in swr. If it seems to be 
approaching a dip with the 
capacitor all the way in, turn 
off the transmitter and add a 
turn to the tuner coil, If it 
seems to be approaching a dip 
with the capacitor alt the way 
out, turn off the transmitter 
and remove a turn from the 
tuner colL Nei^r touch the 
coil while the transmitter is 
operating, unless you get the 
jollies by being tickled with a 
few thousand volts of rf- 

Once the tuner is res^ 
onated, increase the drive in 



your transmitter and retune 
for a dip in swr. You may 
notice that you don't neces- 
sarily get the maximum for- 
ward drive at the same point 
where you gel minimum swr. 
Redip the plate tuning of the 
transmitter^ and you're ready 
to go. With subsequent 
changes in frequencyj simply 
touch the tuner capacitor for 
minimum swr. It takes a bit 
of practice to get used to 
handling endfed antennas, 
but those who have mastered 
the art swear by them. 

Having resonated an an- 
tenna, the next step is multi* 
band operation. With dipoles 
or inverted vees, there's 
nothing at all wrong with 
connecting several antennas 
to one piece of coax. They do 
become trickier to tune, how^ 
ever. 

Trap antennas simply 
utilize the frequency selec- 
tion characteristics of parallel 
wavetraps to provide an end 
of the antenna for one fre- 
quency while letting others 
go on to the ends of the wire. 
These can be resonated in the 
same manner as dipoles or 
inverted vees, remembering 
that the hi^er frequency 
portion, in the middle, must 
be resonated first, then the 
lower portion at the ends. 

The techniques outlined 
here have been very basic — 
old hat to most amateurs, but 
! hope the Novice reader may 
find this article useful in 
getting over that all-impor- 
tant hurdle and getting on the 
air. 

Good luck, and welcome 
to ham radio! ■ 



MULTI'BAND ANTENNA TRAPS 



•, [lELlr i]f r^CE.-TRAri mij! Hi* 

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Advanced technology In action! 



C3 



113 



Sound Operated 



Relay 



- for the ultimate security system 



Rajph Taqgart WBSDQT 
602 So. Jefferson St. 
Masou Mi 488S4 

There are numerous occa* 
sions when it would be 
nice to have a relay circuit 
IJiiat could be conveniently 
triggered by sound. Applica- 
tions include automatic re- 
cording of the output of a 
monitor receiver that is not 
equipped with a COR circuity 
automatic recording of data 



m; 



from any audio link, design 
of VOX circuits for RM or 
home brew sideband equip- 
ment — in short, lots of possi- 
bilities. In most of these 
applicationSi it would also be 
nice to have an adjustable 
time delay so that once trig- 
gered, the control circuit 
would remain actuated for a 
set period in the absence of 
further input, thus saving 
wear and tear on the recorder 



m > 




"~r 



Fig, 1, Basic timer circuits for the NE-SSS. (a) Shows the basic 
tirrmr. A momentary LOWgl pirj 2 causes the 5 voit reed relay 
(K) to pull in for a time period equal to IJRC. This circuit 
cannot be triggered again until the timing cycle is completed* 
(b) Shows the addition of a PNP translstc^ that permits the 
circuit to be continuously triggered during a timing cycle. As 
long as the input lows continue to arrive within the timing 
period (again JJRC), the relay will remain in the pulled-in 
condition. The relay will only drop out if a period of LIRC 
elapses between pulses. 



when monitoring a channel 
where rapid callbacks could 
be expected, where data 
dropouts might occur, or in a 
VOX circuit where we would 
want to avoid cycling the 
relay during momentary 
speech pauses. A great many 
of the circuits that can 
accomplish the relay/time 
delay function have several 
drawbacks, including undue 
circuit complexity or un- 
wanted variation in the time 
delay. While looking through 
application notes for the ver- 
satile Signet ics NE-S55 timer 
IC^ , I realized that this 
chip could be very eff^tively 
put to use in a VOX circuit, 
something which is probably 
done every day in industry, 
but an application which is 
little used In amateur designs. 
A basic NE-555 timer 
circuit Is shown in Fig, 1. If 
the input is momentarily 
pulled low, the timer will pull 
in the reed relay for a period 
determined by R and C in the 
timer circuiL The relay pull- 
in time can be computed 
from the formula t = K1 RC 
If we use a 100k resistor for 



R and a 47 mF capacitor for 
C, the relay would pull in for 
1.1 {1x105) (4.7x10-5) or 

approximately 5.2 seconds. 
By itself, this circuit is not 
ideal for VOX, for it is not 
possible to ret rigger the cir- 
cuit until the timing cycle has 
been completed. By adding a 
simple PNP transistor, as 
shown in Fig. 1 (b), it is pos- 
sible to reirigger it. This 
circuit is widely used as a 
missing pulse detector, for 
the output will remain high 
{relay pulled in) as long as 
trigger pulses continue to 
arrive. Used as a missing pulse 
detector, one would normally 
set the timer for a period 
slightly longer than the 
expected interval between 
pulses. As long as the pulses 
arrive on schedule, the timer 
is reFH^uiivety triggered, but it 
wilt drop out as soon as a 
pulse is missing from the 
input train. This circuit con- 
figuration can easily be used 
in a VOX mode, for if we can 
pull the input low with peaks 

in an audio waveform, the 
relay will close and remain 
closed as long as there is 
audio input When the input 
audio ceases, the relay will 
drop out after a time period 
determined by the RC for- 
mula noted earlier. 

A!l that is required to con- 
vert the missing pulse detec- 
tor to an audio triggered 
circuit is the addition of a 
singje transistor as noted in 
Fig. 2, If this transistor con- 
ducts, it will trigger the timer. 
By adjusting the 10k input 
pot to just short of the point 
where the timer is triggered — 
in other words, biasing the 
transistor to just short of the 
point where it is ready to 
take off — a very small audio 
voltage on the input will 
trigger the timer and keep the 
relay in as long as the audio 
signal is present. The circuit is 
more than sensitive enou^ to 
respond to a signal tapped off 
the speaker leads of a moni- 
tor receiver, keyer, intercom^ 
or what have you* Obviously, 
if you want to use the relay 
with a monitor receiver, the 

receiver should be equipped 
with a squelch circuit, other- 



n4 



Fig. Z (a) The bask oudfo operated re/ay. QJ is any general 
purpose NPN transistor, while Q2 is an equaliy non<ntia^ 
PNP unit The J Ok input pot is adjusted (starting with Von 
the base of QJ) to a point Just short of where QJ turns 'VN" 
as indicated by K pulling in. The closer the bias is set to this 
point, the less audio voltage at the input required to trigger the 
circuit, K is any 5 V reed relay. With the values shown for R 
(1 00k pot) and C (47 mF/20 V tantalum capacitor}^ timing 
values from ,05 to slightly over 5 seconds can tje achieved. In 
practice^ timing below approximately 0,25-0,5 seconds Is 
impractical as the relay mil cycle between syllables. Values in 
excess of 5 seconds can be obtained simply by increasing the 
values of R and C (b) Shows the addition of a 22 h series 
resistor to the I Ok input pot if a 12 V supply is used. If 
voltage fluctuations are expected on tfie supply line, a 4-6 VI 
W zener can 6e added as shown. Adjust the value of the series 
resistor in this case to provide the proper regulated voltage at 
the top of the input pot with the expected supply variations. 
The timer will function quite well at 12 V if a suitable 12 V 
reed relay is used at K, The diode across the relay coil simply 
provides surge protection from the back EMF developed across 
the relay coil and any general purpose t A diode rated at 50 or 
more volts may be used. 



M/ 



'Sv 



wise the background noise 
will trigger the relay just as 
effectively as the voice signals 
Of data we wish to record. 
The attack time of the circuit 
is limited only by the pull-in 
time of the relay, which is 
very short in the case of 



typical reed relays. The timer 
will operate quite nicely at 12 
voltSf but in this case it is 
wise to include a series re- 
sistor at the top of the input 
poL shown in Fig. 2(b) to 
keep the base voltage to 01 
at a safe level. The timer will 




fffj 



nv 



10- 

2iK 



I 



m 



lOK 



WPtir 



retain its accuracy with very 
wide swings in supply voltage, 
but since the bias level is 
critical for Q, it would be 
wise to include a 4-6 V zener 
on the input pot to stabilize 
the bias voltage in a mobile 
installation or situations 
where an unregulated supply 
voltage is used- The chip will 
handle virtually any reed 
relays at 5 or 12 volts, but if 
you should require a larger 
relay in your application, you 
should consider using the 
reed relay to trigger the larger 
unit or interfacing a transistor 
at the timer output to pull in 
a conventional open frame or 
plug-in relay. 

The handful of parts used 



in the circuit are easily assem- 
bled on a small piece of perf- 
board and component placing 
is non-crittcal. This circuit has 
been used in a variety of 
applications in my own 
shack, including making tapes 
from the weather satdlite 
receiver, logging calls on local 
* 'experimenter" simplex 
channels, automatically re- 
cording weather alerts, and rn 
a variety of system control 
applications. It works like a 
charm despite the minimal 
component investment! • 



Refefen<^ 

^ Hanev. L. M, {EdJ, 1973, 
Calectra Digitaf Handbook ,Q,C, 
Electronics^ Rockford, III,, 63 p. 




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EMplretfon Pate 



Traffic Handling 



Explained 



-- a lost art? 



R^Jph A. Giffone WBZYKG 
96SEasi 105th Stt^t 
Brookiyn NY 11236 



I am sure that many of you 
have heard the terms 
ARPSC, AREC, and NTS. 1 
am sure that you were as 
equally confused with those 
terms as you were with these: 
public service, traffic han- 
dling, emergency communica- 
tions. 

"What are they talking 
about?" you have probably 
asked yourself more than 
once, but probably gave up 
trying to understand soon 
after* 

t am going to explain 
those terms and the ideas 
behind them, with the hope 
that it will cause you to take 
an interest and pursue that 
interest. 

The National Traffic 
System (NTS) and the Ama- 
teur Radio Emergency Corps 
(AREC) are actually the 
Amateur Radio Public Service 



Corps (ARPSC) divided into 
two parts: an emergency 
division (AREC) and a traffic 
division (NTS), The AREC is 
usually dormant during 
normal times (no emergency), 
whereas NTS is always active* 
This does not mean, however, 
that the AREC is not ready. 
It's standing by, to be acti- 
vated in an emergency. 

Since my main objective is 
to get you into traffic han- 
dlings I will try to give you as 
complete a background of 
NTS that is possible without 
getting loo technical. 

Hie NTS is a major net- 
work composed of many 
smaller, interdependent net- 
works (nets, for short). These 
smaller nets are categorized 
(from biggest to smallest) as 
local netSj section nets, region 
nets, and area nets. 

The purpose of NTS is to 
handle third party traffic 
during normal times and, 
ultimately, to pass emergency 
traffic during emergencies. By 
passing traffic, we not only 



perform a public service, but 
we aiso train for the times 
when there can*t be any 
mistakes, those life and death 
situations that wc call emer- 
gencies. 

You say you don't know 
what third party traffic is? 
You may think of third party 
traffic as any communication 
(phone patches, radiograms, 
etc) transmitted via amateur 
radio for a third party (some- 
one other than yourself). The 
bulk of the traffic handled on 
NTS are "radio^ms," These 
radiograms (written messages 
in a standard form) may be 
relayed to their destination 
by way of the National 
Traffic System. 

Let*s see how NTS "gets 
you there" (your message, 1 
mean). 

Let's assume that you are 
living in New York Gty. 
Your neighbor wants to send 
birthday greetings to her 
Aunt Enna in Los Angeles^ 
California, Here's how your 
message gets to California: 



First, you must put the 
message in the ARRL's 
standard amateur message 
form (a minor and simple 
technicality). Next thing you 
would do is check into your 
section net, which Is, in this 
case, the New York City- 
Long Island Section Net 
(ML I), A section net is com- 
posed of people from their 
respective ARRL section 
(NLl in this case). If you have 
any traffic whose destination 
is within the section, it can be 
passed directly on your sec- 
tion net. 

Since your message is for 
California, and not within the 
NLl section, it must be taken 
to another net —a region net. 
A region net is composed of 
represent iitives from each of 
the respective section nets of 
that region, (By the way, this 
representative is called a 
liaison, and is the person who 
brin^ all the outgoing traffic 
of one net to another net.) 

Since the NLl section is 
part of the second region, ai! 
the traffic coming from this 
net must gq to the second 
region net (2RN). The liaison 
appointed for that night will 
take your message from you, 
and then check into 2RN 
with that same message. 

There are four liaisons who 
check into the second region 
net, one from the New York 
State Section Net (NYS),one 
from the New Jersey Section 
Net (N|N), one from NLl 
(the one that you check 
into), and a station that will 
go to the Eastern Area Net. 
Now ... if there is any traffic 
for any of the sections in the 
second region, it can be 
passed directly on this net. 
For example: The NYS 
liaison has one message for 
New Jersey. The li^son from 
NJN will take this message. 
He will take it back with him 
to his section net, when he 
checks in later, to be de- 
livered to the proper town. 

If there Is any traffic 
whose destination is not 
within the region, it must be 
taken to yet another net, the 
Eastern Area Net (LAN). 
Such is the case with your 
message. Your message is for 



lis 



California, and that is cer- 
tainly not part of the second 
region. There will be a liaison 
at the second region net who 
will take your traffic to the 
Eastern Area Net. 

If you can see the pattern 
now, you will note that Cali- 
fornia is not part of the EAN 
either^ but must be sent to 
the Pacific Area Net (PAN), 

When the liaison with your 
traffic checks into EAN, he 
will relay the message to an 
operator in the Transcon- 
tinental Corps (TCC), TCC is 
the organization that rdays 
messages to and fro between 
PAN, CAN, and EAN - 
Pacific, Central, and Eastern 
Area Nets respectively. The 
message will then be sent by 
way of TCC to the PAN. 
Your message then undergoes 
the previous processes In the 



reverse order: From PAN (an 
area net), to the sixth region 
net {a region net), to the 
appropriate California section 
net- 

The people who check 
into this section net are 
people from all over the sec- 
tion. A station in Los Angples 
will check in and take your 
traffic. This station would 
then deliver your message to 
your neighbor's Aunt Enna 
by telephone and/or mail. He 
wilt usually take the lime to 
explain how the message got 
there, so as not to baffle its 
recipient. 

That is how your traffic 
gets from place to place 
within the National Traffic 
System. Would you believe 
that this usually takes place 
within about three hours? 

There are three major pur- 



ARRL Operating Form #9 gl^es you the standard amateur 
message format On the opposite side are Q signals artd 
abbreviations for traffic net use. 



poses (in my eye) of NTS and 
traffic handling: public ser- 
vice, emergency communica- 
tions, and fun. 

Most non-hams have a dim 
view of amateur radio be* 
cause their only experience 
with radio has been that of 
TVi and RFI. Handling their 
traffic shows them that ham 
radio has a purpose^ and can 
be useful to them. I used to 
have a problem with my 
neighbor, but once I started 
handling her traffic, she never 
mentioned anything again! 

Knowing how nets operate 
and how you yourself must 
act on a net increases NTS's 
effectiveness during emer- 
gencies. We are not usually so 
lucky: Many inexperienced 
people check into nets (want- 
ing to help^ of course), but 
usually decrease the net's 
efficiency because of this 
inexperience. A well-trained 
amateur is NTS*s biggest 
asseL 



Traffic handling is fun. I 
cannot actually pinpoint the 
reason, but once I started, I 

was hooked. 

By this time, I am sure 
that many of you would like 
to know more. 

The first net that you can 
actually check into is the 
section net; it is unwise to 
check into a higher net if you 
lack the proper experience- 
The section net is, as I said 
before, composed of people 
from your respective ARRL 
section. Most section nets 
have a roster of about 30 
people, but this usually 
depends on what the ham 
population is in that area. 
You realize, of course, that it 
is a rare occasion when more 
than half the net's member- 
ship checks in on any given 
night (this is especially true 
on CW nets), A section net 
with a roster of thirty will 
usually average six to twelve 
check-ins per night. 



T 



AMATEUR MESSAGE FORM 



fnim. 



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C^ ME»AOt tlAHTLE 



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119 



THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE 

RADIOGRAM 



■i' 



VI A AMJ4Ttyfl ft AD to 



PfUMB£Jf 



-121 



mzfm 






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O^iC^i* 



Brooklyn NY 



Tx> ROBERT SMUTNY v^BSWRT 

1 25 COCHRAN PLACE 
VALLEY STREAM NY \\^\ 
516 - 123 - 1^567 

H! 50e X THIS IS 

SHOW PEOPLE mKT h RADIO&RAW 

RALPH mzfm 



19^0 Z 



r^* Ti 



Jan 17 



THIS ffACfiO MElftAQf VrA« RECCIWtt^ AT 



owNvn. 






A SAMPLE ^ADiOGPJU*^ DESIGNED TO 
HCSSA6i 8LANK IS X 73 



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RECD 






rjfO** *T*TFDN LQCPrrO *,T 


D^TE nUE iSPtHAT-Oil 


SENT 




ro tTAf HM« 
























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Eln_* ir^ 


n*B-HAjL *"*^ll» ■■■^1.^ 4««^P!i:TV}W t^m^ KJT*^^ ^^t Wt- A- 



A radiogram message blank. Although not necessary for handling traffic, they do give your 
messages a "spiffy'*fook. 



If you are in the dark as to 
what net meets in your area, 
you might send for the 
ARRL Net Directory (an 
SASE wi[[ bring a quick 
response). This lists all NTS 
nets, as well as other nets 
which do not have traffic 
handling as their main pur- 
pose* The net directory will 
help you find any NTS net. 
They are listed by state and 
frequency as well as by the 
net's name. 

Most section CW nets meet 
anywhere from 6 pm and 
later (usually) and are almost 
exclusively on 80 meters* The 
phone nets, however, are of 
different case* They usually 
meet during the day or in the 
late afternoon. The area 



phone nets usually meet on 
40 meters (for obvious 
reasons). 

There are generally three 
types of traffic nets: CW nets, 
phone nets, RTTY nets. All 
are quite useful, but for 
different purposes. RTTY 
comes in handy when you 
have to handle bulk traffic, 
that is^ many messages all at 
once. Tape operation gives 
this advantage. Unfortu- 
nately, there are very, very 
few RTTY nets in NTS. 
Phone nets, as well as RTTY 
nets, are mainly for those 
who are experienced in traffic 
handlings CW nets are of two 
kinds: high speed and slow 
speed- The high speed net 
usually operates at a speed of 



approximately 18 wpm and is 
usually composed of ex- 
perienced traffic handlers. 

A very valuable net to 
those beginning in traffic 
handling is the slow speed 
net. The slow speed net serves 
many purposes. One of its 
greatest purposes is to train 
inexperienced rookies and 
turn them into veteran traffic 
handlers. This net is for 
making mistakes and no one 
will look down on you for 
making them. (Don't get me 
wrong, I am not saying that 
higji speed nets are for the 
experienced and that slow 
speed nets are for the inex- 
perienced only. This would 
be terrible. The inexperienced 
must learn through the help 



and examples set by the 

experienced. Believe me, 
everyone is usually willing to 
help,) 

The slow speed net used to 
mainly train Novices, Gen* 
erals, etc., but now with the 
new regulations, even Tech- 
nicians can check into slow 
speed nets. Take my word, 
traffic handling will increase 
your code speed by plenty, 
and if youVe a Tech or 
Novice who wants to 
upgrade, it will help a toll 

In time, if you become 
deeply involved in traffic han- 
dling, you may find your 
name printed in QST on the 
Public Service Honor Roll 
and Brass Pounder's League. 
But don't think thai your 
name has to be there to be 
important. The fact is that 
every single person is impor- 
tant whether he passes thou- 
sands of messages or just one. 
Remember that without all 
the little people, the big 
people would have no one to 
relay their traffic to! No man 
is unimportant in NTS! No 
man is a It- important, either. 
tt*s one big team doing a 
public service. 

Traffic handling is surely 
something worth looking 
into- Not only can you per- 
form a public service, you can 
also better yourself in one 
way or another as welL Dont 
think that you cannot be 
used if you don*t have traffic; 
that's not true* NTS needs 
stations from everywhere to 
take traffic fa everywhere. 
There is nothing preventing 
anyone from turning on his 
rig and checking into NTS. ■ 



When you're soldering 
smalt components, it 
can be a job to hold them, 
the soldering iron or gun, and 
the solder. The easy way is 
with a vise made with two 
spring-type clothespins. 



Cut one leg shorter than 
the other, and then use small 
brads to nail the longer ends 
to the side of a small wood 
block* Place the item within 
the jaws of the two clothes- 
pins while you solder. • 



Harry J. Miller 
991 42nd Si. 
Sarasota FL Z3S80 




The Third Hand 



-- how many times? 



120 




I 



Now H^ Crystal Clear 

Yes, now ICOM helps you steer clear of all the hassles of channel crystals. The new 
IC-22S is the same surprising radio youVe come to know and love as the IC-22A, 
except that it is totally crystal independent. Zero crystals. Solid state ensineering 
enables you to program 23 channels of your choice without waiting. Now the 
ICOM performance you've demanded comes with the convenience you've wanted, 
with your new IC-22S* 



VHF, UHF AMATEUR AND MARINE COMMONlCATlON EQUtPMENT 



Distributed by: 




ICOM 



ICOM WEST, INC. 

Suite 3 

13256 Northrup Way 
BeHevue, Wash. 96005 
(206) 747-9020 



ICOM EAST, INC, 

Suite 307 

3331 Towerwood Drive 
Dallas. Texas 75234 
(214> 620-2780 



W. J, Prudhomme WBSDEP 
1405 Ridiiand Ave. 
Motairie LA 70001 



Vehicle 
Security Systems 



-- protect your rig 



The theft of radio equip- 
ment and other such 
valuables from vehicles is a 
current problem that Is get- 
ting more serious with every 
passing day. We are all con- 
cerned with this problem, and 
rightly so, because if some- 
one's vehicle hasn't already 
been burglarized, the odds are 
that sooner or later it will 
That may be a pessimistic 
statement, but we may as 
well face facts: More mobile 



ham rigs are being stolen to- 
day than were stolen a few 
years ago before the rise in 
popularity of CB radios. The 

reason, as we are all aware, is 
that ham rigs are sometimes 
mistaken for CB rigs and are 
ripped off just the same. 

As a result of this problem, 
many hams are taking pre- 
ventive measures to protect 
their valuable property. Some 
of these measures include en- 



graving driver's license num- 
bers both outside and inside 
the unit and installing a quick 
disconnect mount to allow 
the rig to be easily removed 
and stored in the trunk. In 
addition, borrowing an idea 
from the CB market, there 
are a few swivel antenna 
mounts on the market that 
allow VHF antennas to be 
folded into the trunk along 
with the transceiver. 

These measures are worth- 



StnEK. ETC 



CKTME 




QDME 



IT"! 

i 11 \ 



<SAOypiDei:i 

TY^I DO Oft 
SWITCHED IGUli 



BUiT ^ar BOTH 



Fig, L Schema tfc diagram. 



while, but we can always go 
one step further and include 
some type of security system 
as additional insurance 
a^inst unwanted intrusion. 
Granted, if someone wants to 
break into a vehicle, nothing 
can really prevent him. How* 
ever, if a security system in 
the vehicle g?es off making 
some loud noises^ most rip- 
off artists will usually run for 
cover, particularly if the 
attempted burglary is in an 
area where an alarm will draw 
a lot of attention, such as 
parking lots and busy streets. 
The subject of building an 
electronic security system is 
not necessarily a new one, 
but there are new and unique 
ways such a system can be 
designed and built. This 
article describes a solid state 
security system designed 
around simple CMOS NOR 
gates for the ultimate in flex- 
ibility and reliability. 

General Requirements of a 
Security System 

Most of the commercial 
intrusion alarms on the 
market today generally fall 
into one of two categories: 

1, Inexpensive alarms with 
an externa! key switch and no 
Lime delays, and 

2, More expensive 
"electronic*' alarms with 
exit/entry time delays and no 
external key switch. 

The first (which I will 
refer to as key switch alarms), 
while being low in cost, are 
sometimes ineffective because 
of the visible external key 
switch which tips off the 
rip-off artist. He will usually 
do one of two things. He will 
reach under the battery com- 
partment from beneath the 
vehicle and cut the battery 
cable, which disables the 
alarm. Or he can break the 
window, climb in, and make 
off with your rig without 
opening the door or setting 
off the alarm* 

On the other extreme, the 
electronic systems with exit 
and entry delays have no 
visible key switch to tip off 
the burglar. This type is 
usually very effective because 
of the element of surprise, 



122 



but can be expensive to 
purchase. In fact, the high 
cost of some of these sophis- 
ticated alarms has kept many 
hams from having the kind of 
protection they really need. 
One solution to this pro- 
blem is to build your own 
electronic system, thus keep- 
ing the cost low and pro- 
tection high. Some of the 
features that an electronic 
alarm system should have are 
as follows: 

L Be able to operate over a 
wide voltage range and with- 
stand the harsh electrical en- 
vironment of a car's electrical 
system. 

Exit and entry time delays 

J eliminate the need for an 

external key switch. The 

alarm is to be activated from 

within the car, before leaving. 

3. To comply with the laws 
in some states, the alarm 
should have an automatic 
shut-off feature to turn the 
alarm {horn, siren, etc.) off 
after five minutes of sound- 
ing. 

4. There should be negligible 
power drain on the battery 
until the alarm is triggered by 
an intruder- 
s' The alarm should be easy 
to build and install, in addi* 
tion to being low in cost. 

6, Once the alarm is triggered, 
the operation sequence 
should be automatic and not 
affected by subsequent open- 
ing or closing of doors. 

The alarm described in this 
article meets the above re- 
quirements and uses only two 
CMOS integrated circuits. 

How It Works 

Referring to the diagram 
shown in Fig. 1, the heart of 
the alarm system is comprised 
of two CMOS CD4001 2-in- 
put quad NOR gates which 
provide the switching logic 
for the system* These devices 
can operate over a wide vol- 
tage range (+5 V to +15 V) 
and are ideal for automotive 
applications. 

The first CD4001 provides 
the sensor interface, latching 
circuitry and exit/entry time 
delays. The second CD4001 
provides the output (through 
a transistor relay switch)^ as 



as an automatjc shut- 
down time delay for the 
sounding device. 

Two types of sensor inputs 
are provided: one for un- 
grounded door dome light 
switches usually found in 
Fords, and one for the 
grounded type door switches 
such as in Genera! Motors 
cars. When the hidden switch 
within the vehicle is switched 
on, CI begins charging 
through a 680k resistor to 
ground. However, until CI is 
fully charged (about 15-20 
seconds), pin 8 of ICl b is at a 



high logic state. Since the 
output of 3 NOR g3te is low 
if either or both inputs are 
high, the output of (CI b will 
remain low for the duration 
of CI charging and regardless 
of whether the door switches 
are opened or closed. 

However J once CI is fully 
charged, pin 8 of lO b is low, 
and opening a door will cause 
pin 9 of ICl b to also become 
low. When this occurs, the 
output of ICl b becomes high 
and two additional things 
happen. C2 begins charging 
through the 680k (RS) re- 



sistor connected to the out- 
put (pin 10) of IClb. This 
begins the entry time delay 
sequence. Also, since both 
input pins (1 and 2} of ICId 
are also connected to pin 10 
of IClb, the output of ICld 
(pin 3) switches to a low 
state, effectively grounding 
the cathode end of diode Dl , 
When this happens, the input 
of ICIb is latched to a low 
state and will remain that 
way until the alarm is reset 
with the hidden switch. The 
alarm sequence will continue 
regardless of any subsequent 




fi' 



COMPONENT SIDE 



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/77 



RT 









Uir 



,1 MTG 



ri i 



a^ W lB I fc l^ JII I 



TO EXTERNAL 

SOUNDING 

DEVICE 




+ I2V 
(THROUGH 
SPOT SWITCH) 



Fig, 2. Printed circuit board layout. 



1^ 




Front v^hw of the security system controf unit showing the eight-termina! barrier strip for 
external connections* Note that one row of screws has been removed and a small hole drilled 
through each terminal opening into the box. Leads were then brought through these access 

holes and soldered to small solder fugs for attachment to the remaining screws. 

closingor opening of doors or x 2" plastic instruinent avail- scribed works exceptionally 



sensors. 

If the hidden switch is not 
reached In time {15-20 
seconds), lC2d turns on the 
relay through Ql . This turns 
on the alarm sounding device, 
which remains on for the 
duration of the charging of 
C4 (approximately 4 to 5 
minutes)* 

Construction Details 

The security system may 
be built in a 6-1/4" x 3-3/4" 



♦ 12V OC , ALA™_^ 



able from most electronics 
parts suppliers. The layout is 
not particularly criticaL Fig. 
2 is an example of a typical 
PC layout for the circuit. The 
layout will easily fit into the 
above plastic case, Actuafly, 
the entire unit could be con- 
structed much smaller than 
the example in this article by 
redesigning the PC layout for 
a more compact arrangement. 

Although the circuit de- 



well with the relay shown, 
you may want to substitutes 
2 N 305 5 power switching 
transistor in place of the re- 
lay. This will make the unit 
completely solid slate and 
able to switch a load greater 
than the 3 Amps limitation of 
the relay contacts. With a 
slight redesign of the circuit 
board, the 2N3055 could be 
mounted in the same area 
previously occupied by the 
relay. If anyone is interested 




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> 



o- R2 



4 



K 



Re 



02 



i RI6 



Tmtg 



*- R5 



H7 



3IN. 



^m. 



Fig, 5. Component placement. 



m this feature, drop me a 
self-addressed stamped en- 
velope, and 111 send you a 
schematic diagram of the cir- 
cuit. 

If the actual load of the 
alarm sounding device is 
greater than 3 Amps, and you 
want to build the alarm with 
the internal relay, just use its 
contacts to control a heavy- 
duty relay at the load* In this 
way, the amount of current 
to be switched is limited only 
to the rating of the contacts 
at the source. 

The printed circuit is 
etched from a 3" x 5" phe- 
nolic or epoxy glass blank, 
using standard practices. It ' 
strongly recommended tl -*^^^ 
IC sockets or molex pins i ^ 
used for the two ICs. The 
obvious reason for this is to 
allow replacement of the ICs 
{and also to protect the sensi- 
tive input terminals from 
static electric charges during 
soldering). 

Checkout and Installation 

Ajter the circuit board has 

been etched and wired, it's 
lime for the initial checkout. 
First check out all con- 
nections, and, when you are 
satisfied there are no wiring 
errors, insert the CD4001Sj i 
avoiding any hand contact 
with their input pins. Then , 
apply power to the circuit {-V 
to pin 7 and +V to pin 3 on 
the external terminal strip, 
temporarily eliminating the | 
hidden SPOT switch to be 
used in the actual installa- 
tion). 

Next, with an ohmmeter, 
check the relay contacts. Pins 
5 and 6 should indicate a 
closed circuit, and pins 6 and 
4 should indicate an open 
circuit. After the initial entry 
delay period, use a jumper 
wire to momentarily connect 
input pin 1 to +V. This 
should start the alarm se- 
quence, and after 20-30 
seconds, you should hear the 
relay operate* Check the con- 
tacts with your ohmmeter. 
Pins 4 and 6 should remain 
closed for about 4-5 minutes 
and then reopen- 
Next, remove power and 
short pin 3 to ground to 



124 



I 



discharge the elecuolytics. 
This would be accomplished 
automatically when the unit 
is operated with the hidden 
SPOT switch (see the 
schematic diagram). Then re- 
store power and wait for the 
initial exit time delay to re- 
set. Repeal the previous 
check for input pin 3, but in 
this case momentarily con- 
nect the jumper from pin 3 to 
ground. After the entry time 
delay cycle completes, the 
output contacts of the relay 
should close and remain 
closed for 4-5 minutes. This 
completes the initial check- 
t and the unit is ready for 
installation into your car. 

External connections are 
made through the barrier 
terminal strip as shown in 
Fig. 4. Power for the unit is 
derived from the car's fuse 
block, from a terminal that is 
not switched by the ignition 
switch. 

The actual location for the 
unit may be anywhere in the 
vehicle that h away from 
view and preferably not easily 
reached. Also, the hidden 
switch should be installed at a 
convenient location that Is 
not obvious to an intruder. 
The only remaining con- 
nection to be made is to the 
dome light circuit- Depending 
on your particular car^ this 
connection may be to Input 
pin 1 or 2 but not both. If 
your car uses ungrounded 
door switches, the connection 




This photograph shows a top i^iew of the PC board with the components in pface. External 
con nee tf am are made to the board through the terminai strip on the opposite side of the 
aluminum paneL 



wilt be to pin 1. (Note that 
this connection should be on 
the load side of the switch as 
shown on the schematic.) On 
the other hand, if your car 
uses grounded type door 
switches, input pin 2 should 
be used. 

To complete the instal- 
lation, you may want to add 
door switches to the two rear 
doors, trunk, and hood for 
total protection. As before, 
match the new door switches 
to your existing door switch- 
es and connect to the 
appropriate input terminaL 

This security system 
should provide years of 



troublefree operation, and 
hopefully will someday foil 
the plans of any would-be 
intruder. If it prevents an 
unauthorized entry on just 
one occasion, it will have 
more than paid for itself, in 
fact, the cost to build this 
system is so reasonable that 
you may want to build an- 
other for your home, apart- 
ment or camper. Power drain 
is so negligible that it can be 
operated from lantern bat- 
teries for years. Just use NC 
magnetic reed switches in 
series from +V to the input of 
the unused IClc. Then con- 



nect the output of this ICIc 
to input terminal 1 on the 
circuit board. As long as all 
switches are closed, the 
inputs are high and the out- 
put of IClc is low. If a door 
is opened, the output of IClc 
goes high and the normal 
alarm sequence is started. 

As you can see, this circuit 
is very versatile and may be 
adapted to just about any 
alarm application. ■ 

References 

1. "20 Easy-To-Build COSMOS 
Burglar Alarms — Part 2/' Radio- 
Bieciro files, R,M. Wlareton, May. 
1975, page 48, 




C1,C2 

C3 

C4 

D1. D2 
D3 



Parts List 

30 uF @ 25 volts electrolytic 

0,01 F bypass 

470 uF @ 25 volts eiectrotytic 

1N9T4 

1N4001,1A ^ 1000 volts PI V 



I CI , IC2 CD4001 AE quad 2Hnput NOR gate 



01 



2N2222A NPN transistor 



All resistors are Y* Watt, 1 0% 



R1/R2,R3,R6, 


R9. 




R13,RT5, 


R1S 




12,000 Ohms 


R4 






22,000 Ohms 


R5 






680,000 Ohms 


R8, R14 






620,000 Ohms 


R7. RIO 






22 megohms 


R11 






1200 Ohms 


R12 






120,000 Ohms 



Fig. 4, External connections (not to scale), "^Connect terminal 
J or 2, but not both, to the appropriate door switch (f for 
ungrounded and 2 for grounded type switches). 



RL-1 SPOT reJay with a 12 volt coiJ (Bur stein -Apple bee stock number 

19A 1823-3 J 

Misc IC sac kats, plastic instrument case^ terminal ^rtp« circuH board 



^ 



125 



Tufts Radio EJectronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (61 7 J 395-8280 



GENERAL MULTI-PURPOSE V-O-Ms • DROP RESISTANT • HAND SIZE • MODEL 310 V-O-M •TYPE 3 

1. Drop -resistant^ hand^ize V-O^M witti hifh-imfMCt thermoplastic 




Cm Na 1Q-3B» SI. 10 
Vinyl pflvJh cut* 



2, 20,000 Ohms per voU OC and 5,000 Ohms per volt AC; diode 
overload protection with fused Rx1 Ohms range. 

3. Singte range switch; direct reading AC Amp range to facilitate 
clamp-on AC Ammeter usage, 

RANGES 
DC Volts: 0-3- 12^0-300, 1,200 {20,000 Ohms per VoltK 
AC Volte: 0-3-12-60-300-1,200 (5,000 Ohms per VohJ. 
Ohmi: 0-20k-200k-2Mn-20M n (200 Ohm qenter scale on low 
range)* 

DC Microamperes: 0-600 at 250 mV- 
DC Milliamperes: 0-6-60-600 at 250 mV, 
Accuracyr ±3% DC; ±4% AC; (lull scale). 
Scale Uength: 2-1 /8". 

Meter: Self -shielded: diode overload proiecied; spring hacked jewels. 
CaseL Molded, black* htgh impact thermoplastic with slide latch 
cover lor access to batteries and fuse, 2-3/4** w x 1-5/16" d k 4*1/4" 

h. 

Batteries: NEDA 15V 220 (1), 1HV 910F t1): Complete with 42*^ 

leads. aJltgator clips, batteries and instruction manual. Shpg. Wtv 2 

lbs. 

Model 310 Cat. ?Mo. 301 S . . . « * . .........*.....« $53.00 



Kovjcfl Crv^aU {Specify Band Only} 



\ 






ALL BAND PREAMPLIFIERS 



TWO METERS 




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YSTALS IN STOCK |n StOCk! 

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Make/IVlodel 


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Rec. Freq. 













































•6THRU16QMEURS 

* TWO MODELS AVAILABLE 

* RECOMMENDED FOR 
RECEIVER USE ONLY 

* mCLUDES POWIR SUPPLY 



MODEL PLF ernploys a dual gate FET providiing noise 
figures of 1.5 to 3.4 db., depending upon the band. 
The weak signal performance of most receivers as well 
as image and spurious rejection are greatly improved. 
Overall gain is in excess of 20 db. Panel contains 
switching that transfers the antenna directly to the re- 
ceiver or to the Preamp* 

Model PLF 1 17V AC 60 Hi. Wired & Tested $44,00 






No. 114^404^002 $18.50 



NYE VIKING CODE PRACTICE SET 



Get the RIGHT ST ARTl 

With 3 NYE VIKIMG Code Practice Set you get a sure, smooth, Speed-X model 
310-001 tfarismitiing key^ a linear circyit oscillator and amplifier^ with a bufUnn 2'' 
speaker^ alt mounted cm a heavy duty aluminum base with non-skid feet. Operates on 
standard 9V transistor type battery (not incJuded). Units can be connected in parallel 
so that t\NO or more operators can practice sending and receiving to each other. List 
price, $18.50, 




75 THRU 10 METER DIPOLES 



3, 



NOTES 

1 MocSeltpteiaced ' ** ' wiM b« «eiilibl« 1^77. 

AIE nwddi itnvt ar« futniihed vwiti cnrnp/solder lygt 
AIH modeli cin be ^urnijlwd nvith « SO-239 femflln 
conxial connociar 3t addiiianal coit. Th& S;0'239 ni«tn 
with tho itindarct PL 3'5@ mal^ coaxial cable connKtorn 
To order thi$ fictorv Jt>tUtl4tf ciption. Mid rhe leiiiH 'A' 
liter the modvl riuTnto«T Ejcimpte 40-20 HOe'A. 
75 meivt modcU *fs Tactofy lirrwd to rnoruts ai 39S0 
kHj. tSPt mofMi are faclBrr VannA to n^tmsif jM 3SCII 

3^0 ItHj. Sfv VSWn eutwcs far ott^r r««onanc( diU. 



Fully Air TpSilETll 1 hirtiJM*n-[t5 Alrr»dv ih UsfP 

ftatad^ for b»ti«f rhan ful It^F vv*m AM/CWar &^^<HA<i*l n* 9>biii^ 
Id la TSi dhmi tMdli<u - VSWH uptdv 1.5 is t m*. mat huflMi - Sij 

It ALL 



WOO EL 


BANDS 


PfUCE 


WEIGMT 


LENGTH 




tM««nl 




fOr^'KgJ 


4Fl,'Uir4l 


4{>20HD 


4D^ 


S4g.so 


36/13 


Mfjflg 


^atOHD 


40/20/16/10 


53- &0 


36/101 


IB/ 10,9 


&a40HD 


30/40 ♦ 15 


S7.50 


41/ns 


sa/11 .0 


7S4D HD 


75/40 


56 00 


mnx'i 


§6/30 1 


75^40 HD tSPl 


7hfm 


5710 


40^1 I? 


eaTO t 


75-20 HD 


T&40 30 


66 50 


44/1^3 


mnaA 


7S30 HD |SP| 


75^40^-30 


GGSO 


44^1:71 


66/30-1 


7Si»eHD 


T5*'*&'»/1S 10 


lA^ 


4a^1J4 


«£/»! 


JS^I0HOtSP> 


J5^ 40/20/15/ 10 


74 SO 


48/134 


«ft/30l 


e&IQHD 


80.' 40/70/ 15/10 


7«50 


5{k/1.40 


69/21.0 



NO TRAPS- NO COILS- 
NO STUBS- NO CAPACITORS 



MOR-GAkN HD Olf^LES . • QFte hidt tN l«f^ »f 
Q^nventKonai hjilf wave dapoiet • Mkiiti-tMnd. Multi- 
tref^uency, * MBximum etficiencv - no tr dpi. Iq ad ing cotlSj 
or stubj, * Fully assembled and pretunod - no m^iituring, 
no cutting. * All vu^athar rat^d - 1 KW AM, 2,5 <VV CW or 
PEP SSB, • PfoveF) performafYce - mofe than 15.000 have 
b«ei> d«iiv«t«d, • P«rmii uw ot tH* full c^Aljiiiih« of 
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bvnds. • Lcrwta cost/benff it *nw*v>4 or> the m^fket todtaV' 
• Fbsi QSY - no fndlirw iv^tdtiii;). * Hhjj^st perlormafice 
for itkc Novicv 9s well ai titt Extra CLau Op. 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mvstic Avenup • MfirifnrH Jv/IA n^iRR • mi-iv one oaon 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



SST T-1 RANDOM WIRE ANTENNA TUNER 



ff5 



All band operatioia (160-10 meters) with 
most any random length wire. 200 Walt 
power capability. Ideal lor portable or home 
opei-;ition. A must for Field Day. Size: 2 x 
4*1/4 X 2-3/8. Buih'in neon tune^up indica- 
tor, Guaranleed for 90 days. Compact — 
easy to use. Only $29,95, 



aQQ 

9BQ 



BDQ 



Model 
210 



Model 
200 V 







ASTATIC 
MICROPHONES 



SfLVER EAGLE -$69,95 

T-tJG8-Dl04« transistorized .... ..... 548,60 

T-UG9-D104, "Golden Eagle/' tjc^ciaistorized $35.40 
T-UG9-D104, "Silver Eagle," transistorized . $69.95 
UG^D104f ceramic or crystal ^••,^..^«*... $42.60 



tafk 
power 




Model 
220 



CES Touch Tone Pads 

• Mod^l 200V — acoustic coupling. $59.95 

• Model 210 — fof mounting on waJkies or 
hand-he Ids. S54.95 

•Model 220 — CES can now offer you a 
TOUCH TONE back for Standard CommLifi- 
icatlons hand-held radios. This is the com- 
plete back assembly with the TOUCH 
TONE encoder mounted and ready to plLig 
into the private channel connector. Also 
induded Is a LED tone generator indicator 
and an external tone deviation adjustnr^ent. 
S74.95, 




$43.95 
Kit 



for an Economy Price? 

THAT'S RIGHTl 

introducing the ECONO-LINE 

7073 1-4W 6&aCNV 1inj7aauT 14^^149 MHl S169.00 

Now get TPL COMMUNICATIONS 
quality and reMabiMty at an economy 
price. The new Econo-Llne gives you 
everything that youVe come to expect 
from TPL at a real co$I reduction. The 
latest mechanical and electronic construc- 
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Econo-Line your besi amplifier value. 
Unique broad-band circuitry requires no 
tuning throughout the entire 2-nieter band 
and adjacent MARS channels. See these 
great new additions to the TPL COMMUN 
ICATIONS product line at your favorite 
amateur radio dealer. 

For prices and specifications please write 
for oiif Amateur Products Summary! FCC 
type accepted power amplifiers also avail- 
able. Please call or write for a copy of 
TPL's Coinmercial Products Summary. 



SLINKY! 

A LOT of antenna in a LITTLE space 
New Slioky® dipole* with helical 
loadtng radiates a good signal at 1/10 
wavelength tong) 

*patrni No. 3,S3MMO 




M; Hr nt9 



H fm itffwi 









llflUfll TbtKS 



ihiti een ip tau 





^miftrti «Ktti> till ,^^trt ^ 

* Tntt. «l«c I ncailJy vTiAll BO f T^. 40. a 20 mew vitinna cp*ril*» 
■I any Imiglh From ?4 id 7C feel * na flKlra biFun sf iransniAlch 
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ArvougMoht in aHiCor apBrtin^nl * full leQ^I puwrir ■ law SWR 
QverC€fllpl<4taa/7$, 40, A.?OiTi«i«r bafids ■ muctt to^eraTmo- 
spher^ fWtfifr ptfiliup man a v«rtbC4! andi rved^ no ladiaJa. < ktt 
tncimj— a pa^ oi ftfP*cia^lf-fhAdB 4^^im^ it^ 1^ ^niAch toi^ 
co ia. cantainiimQ 33S l*ci of r*d4|jng cDnduCicv EuHii^ W ft 
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FT^OtO 




PT^ 101 E TRANSCEIVER 



FT 301 

FP aoi DIG 

FP 301 

FP 301 CID 

FRG 7 

QTR 24 

FT I01'E 

tSO^IOM 

FT 101EE 

160-10M 

FT-lOieX 

160-1QM 

FL-2100B 

FTV6S0B 

fTV-250 

FV-IOIB 

SP-101B 

SP-101PB 

YO-10O 

YD-844 

FA-9 

MMB t 

RFP 102 

XF30C 

FR-101S 

SOLID STATE 

FR 101 DIG 

SOLID STATE 

FT301S 

FT 301 S 



160M-10M Transceiver - 20O WPEP $769 
160M-10M Transceiver - 200 WPEP 935 
AC Power Supply 125 

AC P,S. vv/CIOck and CW ID 209 

General Cov, Synthesized Receiver 299 
Yaesu World Clock 30 



Ace es Dries; 
FC& 
FC-2 
FM-1 



XCV R W/Pf ocessof 

XCVR W/O Processor 

XCVR W/O Processor 
AC Only. Less Mike 
Linear Amplifier 
6M Trann^erter 
2M Transvertar 
External VFO 
Speaker 
Speak er/Fatcb 
Monitor Scope 
Dyn-am ic Base Mike 
Cooling F^n 
Mobile Mount 
RF SpJBBch Processor 
600 Hz CW Filter 

160 2M/SW RCVR 

160 2M/SW RCVR 
160 lOM 40 WPEP 
teOiaiW 40WPEP Digitnl 



729 
649 



589 

39d 

199 

199 

109 

22 

59 

199 

29 

15 

19 

79 

40 

489 

599 
55e 

765 



XF aofi 

XF30C 
XF30O 

SP loie 

F L 1 01 

SOLID STATE 160-lOM 



6M Converter 
2M Converter 
FM Detector 
Auk/SW Crystal-t 
AM Wide Fitter 
600 Hi CW Filter- 
FM Filter 
Speaker 



24 
25 
20 
5 
40 
40 
49 
22 



TRANSMITTER 


525 


Acce&^Ories: 






RFP 101 


RF Speach Processor 


79 


MONITOR/TEST EQUIPMENT 




VC500 J 


500 MHzClOPPM) 






Counter 


249 


YC500S 


iOOMHtHPPMJ 






CaunwiT 


399 


YCSODE 


500 MHf {0.02 PPM* 






Counter 


537 


YO-100 


Wloriitor Scape 


199 


YP-150 


Dummy Load/Watt Mete 


r 69 


YC'601 


Digital Readout 






no 1/401 s&rie^) 


1€9 


VHF FM & SSS TRANSCEIVERS 





FT-€20B 
FT-221 

Accessories; 
MMB'4 



6M AM/CW/SSB 
2M AM/FM/CW/SSB 

Mo bite Mourtt 
CFT 620B, FT 221) 



365 
629 



19 





Name, 



Call 



Radio Electronics 

209 Mystic Avenue , 
Medford MA 02155 
1617} 395-8280 

FREE Gift With 

Everi) Order! 



Address. 
City 



State 



Order: 



Zip 



n Check encfosed 

n BankAmericard D MasterCharge D American Express 

Credit card #, Interbank # 

Signature Card expiration date _ 



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accepted on 

MOST items! 



Prices FOB Medford MA. 
All units can be shipped 
UPS. MA residents add 5% 
sales ta«. Minimum $3.00 
for shipping 8t handling on 
all orders, $10,00 merchan- 
dise minimum please. 



Cash orders over SI 200 deduct 5%. No other discounts offered. All sales final 



Tufts Radio Electronics « 209 Mystic Avenue # Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 39S-8280 



HHM RRDIO/ 

MOBILE 

COMMUNICRTIONS 



(L\ 



THQMSON-CSF 



NPC 





ELECTRON CS 




MODEL 


NET PRICE 


103R 


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600 


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102 


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612 


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$1 49.95 












MODEL 12HM4 

Nlf'C 2,& Amp RaggltttflcS PoiAier Supply- 
Solid Slata. Short Circuk Prolbciiid. 



Law cast re^iLilaLed power niup^ty 
qulehv i^f'^^i^rjs 115 veils AC to 
13 5 vdlTs DC z 2O0 FniLlLvOllS. 
1.5 3rn£kS conlinucpus. 2.5 mm 
r«Q. Ideal ty uittd lor op^fatirtg 
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13 HM 4 wiihbuilt 


m 


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Output Voftflpe 
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1.5 Afrp 
2.5 Amp 


14VDC 

TO mV RMS 



Cjim: 3" (H) X 4" (W) x SV)" fD}. Snipping Wulghl: 3 Iti?. 



MODEL 107 



NPC A Amfi Pow*r 
Supp^v. 6 Am0 Mix. 

ProT*ct«d 




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C^ftittnuDUB Current {f ul'i' l&ud'} 


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T iMi A 4^" mt 1 5%" f oi 



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Converts 115 vdtts AC to 13 € vOfl% DC ^2C0 milkvi^^ Handlf^J: S 
amp? cofilmyous and 4 amtvs man Ideally sulled for apislieatidfi^ 

wtiBff no hum and DC sliibiltly are iriii;>ortiini sudt as CB iraTtsmis^icm. 

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Caji aiign bs used to tnckts-ctiar^n 12 vol I car batt^r^^iis. 

Outpu I Vo ItBi* rS 6 = ? VDC 1 3 ^ Hl 3 VOC 

LFne/LPdi) RflQumttoci 20 mV 50 mV 

Rl(ipl«'N<]il* 2 mV flMS 5 mV RMS 

Tfxna^D^l flwpCKva 30 uiSec 

CufTMn UnUl 4 Amp 

CurrvfM ¥e/iab^ 1 Amp 






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a Amp 
13 Amp 

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{DV ShpftM^ WoigtTL 9.S «te 



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Output Vanagv rMo loddj 
Output Vona>gi} iP-iiil UP^ttl 
Fri!squoncy (Nd LcpAdji 
Frequency^ 4 Full Lcad| 
Pciw*rContinyoij» 
Poittftr Peak 
PBTftllel ConnffcUcfl 


17 VOC If* 

lis V RMS 

Si Hi 

54 Me 

ZOOW 
240W 
350W 


14VE>C IN 

130 V RMS 
IIS V RMS 
66 Ht 


Ati Vatan Af« Typical 





NPC 2G Amp Regulalvdl Pouter Suppiv 4Way^ PrDtected. 
Dutpuit VdIibbb and CurrHnt t^etert. 

Extr? fii*avydJty um[ quielly cnnverts 115 VDlt£ AC to 13.6 votta OC » 200 

milliVDlts tQ afnp&c&nilriuuijs 25 amps max AH soii4 stale Feafur^s 

rKal tiArefli Qii«iiiH4 ovin^iyip anl ttiermai protectKin it^eally sutled 

'7 isoi!fdtmQmatiltel^ivid ani taear amplitier m ynir Ihto v office 

Eic-ii«ni bendi pcpwer supply l«^ tstsig ail SffVic«g ol oveiJc oofflmu^ 

ivcalKm HiiipnBiL 

FTmCAt 

Output Vonsge 13.6 • 2VOC 

Una/ I^OiK} Rufpi^tiDfi 50 mV 

i%}pple Nofse S mv RMS 

TfansiefH R«potts* 20 yS*c 

C uf FirnT Ccniiriuoua 1 A m p 

CurfortlJmil 26 Amp 

Ovat vp II [tgo Prolecuon 1 fl .& V 

Thermal Overload laC'F 

Cose; 4W (H» K 9" CW| x a^" (D) Shippmg WniQlil 15 IPs 



13.fi - 3VOC 
100 mV 
lOmVAMS 



15 W 




MODEL 104R 

M^PC 6 Ainp Power Supply 
RaguiAt*^, 
S-Dlid StAl«. DuM 
Overload Pfotaction. 

Convens n5 irtHts AC to 13 6 vrtls 
DC t 20D mMli volts Hanfltfls 4 
amps cnntiriuous and S amps maK 

- Id&a^ly m i [«l lor app] ical I ons *rtmi 
exc^ilefliOC stabilitv ta impoiUifit^ such as CB transmission, small Ham 
radio tracismitjcr. and liigl! qu«illty elgNl-track car 3l«re<^ Can be* u:^d ta 
trlckle-ct^oe 12 volioir baiturias. 

MAKIMU4I TVPICAt 

^3G. ^ 2 V£)C ^3.^ * 3 VOC 

30 mv 50 mV 

2 mV RUS 5 mv nW-S 

4 Airrp 
ftAttp 
2Ai*ip 

tD| Si«pp0>q^M*i9rit £lb&. 



Otrtput VAtt«f]« 
LJna/ioaO Raqui^mhi 

Ri>0lerltjj3f9« 
Tmmjant R«cpc»f^ 

CUTf AfTl Con8mi0U3l 

Ctiff aai Limit 

CuJFAfil FqIuIivcIi 

C4W 3 (M»i5 tWlp* 




MODEL 12Va 

NPC 1.7S Amp 
pQwer Supply. 
3 Arpp M41I- 

futvrtiofts siltnUy m converl^ 

ing tiS voc^ AC 6t 12 v04ts 

CC Ideally iuned lor iQO^t 

appticaiMm ^tsdutfiiiii A-tiadi stvto, tn^glar aiaim. €«r radto and 

cassetieapepHycr wtttwi pow rvfifig. 



Conlirtuoui Current i Full Load) 
Oulpul VoUtAQfl I N« Load I 
Oiit|]yl Von&ge {Fuji Loadl 
Fjllcnng Gnpaolor 
Rippla (F^ull toBd) 
S^^H Circii^l Protacliiun 



1 fi Amp 
lev mas; 
12 V mtn 
S.OOOuF 

.4 V RMS 
Thermai BraakAr 



Caw; 3" (Hi * 4" fWl it s'-." [[?) Shipptng WaigM, 3 Ibn 




MODEL 102 

NPC 2.5 AiTip 

Pfjw4r SupipIV' 

4 Amp MAk. Solid Statt!. 

Overi>Dad Protected. 

Fjnciiions sJIpnlly In CDnveil- 
mg T1S volls AC to I^^vdKs 
OC. 2,5 amps oDntlnuatJs. 4 am(^ m^x. EnatPJes anyone to enjcy CB 
rajdjo. car fl^Erad^ cartridge, EiaSi^ttB tape ptayer Or caf rad-io m a iwne 

Cofflmitoua Curr*m (Fuli Laadit i}.$ Amp 

Oulpul VoilAgA (Mo Load I Ifi V max 

Output VoHAigc (Full Uud I 1 ? V fnin 

FBftrin^ CAfwaior &00OuF 

apgtHf^tmiamSi ivRus 

Sbott Cireii« Protection Thttrmai Bresiiflf 



MRRINE fr RV model 612 



MODEL 12-t15 



NPC 12 IIBSplid Srata irwttrrmr. lOQ W 

PataIIcI Conn«ctian for High^ Pow^r op lo 3&0 W, 

Cprwfm II «^ DC n lis vem AC rfa 80 Hr ooiput 20Q ndts contin- 
[iQus miBiiiiiafi wi^ p^( tKi P iiii 14) tD Z40 iait$. Alt s^otm semiCiMiuc 
tijrs assure high r^habitiiy a1 tiC£££ivf ambient lem:p«falures Tht 
ompiJi voltage is a square wave T)% gnvefter is not recommeRdto 
wtierfi iijgti Iransients are wt loterabie 

The !?-115 alloi^ yoir 10 have AC house cuiren! m your boai. csr truck, 
camper, l>ouse UaiJer, or houscl^qal will cperme small houSDhoki rippil- 
ancEs. T.V . tiand tods, eli5Cktc sha\fef. AC fudios. and lights withni 
power raiinQ Built-in ovuricad protectioa 

Cau 4^' {H^ H 7W' lW\ x SH ' (D» Shipping WteQhl 7 lbs 



Modal 612 
Powair Convortar 

flPC 612 converts 6 vott 
negatnt groM) v 1? volt 
posilivt 9* ound et«ctrk^ 
systems to 1 2 volt nep^ 
r^v? ground opieration 
Pro^'Kdes lull 3 imp con- 
tinuous power The in- 
expensive sol liitioti tor 
install 1^9 c^ f^fdiQS. $tereo 
and cass^ciiE] tape pidiyets. 
in vehtcte^ ^4th 6 vqM neg- 
ative QToiind at 12 VQll 
positive grcmnd systems. 

ShipE>in$Wtmiit; 1 lb 




Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • <617( 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics •209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 




ARGONAUT 



AMPUFlEft 
*»05 



1fflr 



ARGONAUT. MODEL 509 

Covers all Amateur iiands 10-80 motors. 
9 MHi crystal i*lier. 2.5 kHz bend width. 17 
shape fact Of ^ 6/50 dB points. Power 
required 1 2-1 S VOC # 1 BO frtA recerve, 800 
mA trdnuni! ai fsmJ Oulput. Construct*dn, 
alumtfiurn chassis, top andi front pand, 
molded plastic end panets, Creairr front 
panels uvalnui vinyl top iind end trim^ Sift: 
K 13" X 7", Vyeighr e lbs. 



HWO 4%' 



LINEAR AMPLIFIER, MODEL 405 

Covers tnH AmateLr tsiind!; 10-30 meters, 
50 v^tts outpui pDwer. coniinuoys siriH 



TEN -TEC 



uv^we. HF wattmeter. SWR merer. Powier 
required 12-15 VDC li^^ S A. m^Jt, Construe 
tion: aiMmimmi chassis, too and front panet, 
nnolded pla^ic side panels. Cream front 
panel, walnut vinyi top arwj end trim. Size: 
HWD 4'/' X 7" X 8" Wtight 2^^ lbs 

Arf omut. Model 509 ..... S3S9.00 

Linear AmplHidr, Model 405 .159,00 

Power Supply, Model 251 

(Will power both units) - . , , . 35.00 

Powor Supply, Model 210 

(Will power Argonaut only) . . 30.00 



T!ie new uttzs-mcdcfn Mty 9otid-dtate TRITON makes opemting e^er 
and a lot more fun, niihout the limitations of vacuum tubes. 

For one thing, you can diange bands with the flkk of a switch and no danger 
of ofi-Tmoa^c& damftge. And no deterioi^tiaa of perfonoanoe with age. 

But that's not aiL A superlative S-poEe i-f filter and l^s than 2% 
audio diatoition, transmitting and receiving, makes it the smoothest 
and deanest signal on the air. 

The TRITON IV specifics tiona are im peccable. For selectivity, stability and 
receiver Bensitivit>% And it has features sudi as fuU CW break-in, pj^- 
selectabte ALC, oH-eei tuning, aepamte AC power supply, 12 VDC opemtian, 
pofectly shaped CW wave forni, built-in SWR bridge and on and otl 

For new standards of SSB and CW coaxtDUiiicatkio* wnte for fuU details 
m talk it over with your TEN^TEC dealer. We*d like to tfiU yoy why "TTiey 



Ikm't Make *Em Like They Used To"^ makes Ham Radio evoi more fun. 



TETTON IV ^emm 

ACCESSORIES: 

Model 240 One^wty Canvtitt*r I 97.00 

Mii^l 244 DiKitai Readout ^ 197.00 



Hodd 245 CW Fflter ..... 125.00 

hfodd 149 Kdtsc Blanker * 29.0ti 

MfMlcl 23 2G Puwcr Supply E 09.(10 

Modd 262G Powuj SupplyA'OK . , 139.00 




iisir 

TEN -TEC 

TRITON IV 

Digital Model 544 

£869.00 




ICR20-A ELECTRONIC KEYER 

A fine Instrument Cor all-around high perfor- 
mance electronic Keying. Paddle actuation 
foree is factory adjui^led for rythmic smooth 
keying. Contact adjustments on front. 
Waighiting factor factory set for optimum 
smoothness and articulaiion. Over-ride 
^^straighl key" conveniently located for 
emphasis, QRS .^ending or tune-up. Reed 
relay output. Side-tone generator with 
ad|u stable level. Self*com pie ting characters. 
Plug-in circuit board. For 117 VAC, 50-60 
Hz or 6-14 VDC* Finished In cream and 
walnut vfnyl. Price $69. &0 

KR5-A ELECTRONIC KEYER 

Stmliat to KR20-A but without side-tone 
osrlllaior or AC power supply. Ideal for 
portable, mobile or fixed station, A great 
value that will give years of troublefree 
service. Housed in an attractive case with 
cream front* walnut \inyl top. For 6-14 
VDC operation. Pn<% S3 9. 50 

KRi-A DELUXE DUAL PADDLE 

Paddle assembly is that used in the KR5Q« 
boused in an atttactive formed aluniinuin 
case. Price $a5.00 

KR2'A SINGLE LEVER PADDLE 

For keying conventional "TO" or discrete 



ehajracter keyers, &^ used in the KR20-A. 
Price $17.00 

KRftO ELECTRONIC KEYER 

A completely automatic electronic keyer 
fuUy adjustable to your operating style and 
preference « speed, touch and weithiing« the 
ratio of the length of dits and dahs to the 
space between them. Self-controUed keyer 
to transmit your thoughts clearly, artfcu- 
lately and almost effortless* The iambic 
(squeeze) feature allows the insertion of dits 
and dahs with perfect timing. 

An automatic weighting system provider 
increased character to space ratio at slowet 
speeds, defreaslng as the speed is Increased* 
keeping the balance between smoothness at 
low speeds and easy to copy higher speed. 
High mteiiigibility and rythmic transmission 
is maintained at all speeds, automatically. 

Memories provided for both dits and 
dahs but eith^* may be defeated by switches 
on the rear pajiel. Thus, the KR50 may be 
operated as: a lull iambic (squee7e) keyer* 
with a single memory or as a conventional 
type keyer^ All chajraciers are self^complet- 
ing. Price $110.00 

SPECIFICATIONS 

Speed Range: 6-50 w.p.m. 

Weighting Ratio Range: 50% to 150% ol 
classical dit length. 



Memories: Dlt and dah. [ndividual defeat 

switches. 
Paddle Actuation Force: 5-50 gins» 
Power Source; 117VAC, 50-60 Hz, 6-14 

VDC. 
Finish: Cream front, walnut vinyl top and 

side panel trim. 
Output: Reed relay. Contact rattni 15 VA, 

400 V. max. 
Paddles: Torque drive with ball bearing 

pivot. 
Side-tone: 500 Hz tone. 
Adjustable output to 1 volt. 
Size HWD: ^W" ^ oW* x BW 
Weight: 1^ lbs. 



.*i 



TEN -TEC 




KR50 





cushcrarff 



4 ELEMENT BEAM • 1015 20 METERS 



From one package you roceive every component to quickly and easily assefT^ble your 
beam, ATB-34's rugged construction, full power handling capability, broad band 
coverage, and four active elements will give you superior performance on all throe bands. 
Our new coaxial traps are very high Q, resulting in extremely lo^ ohmic losses and 
longer full performance elenaents. They are rated for 2KW power handling. F«ad is direct 
52 ohm through the 1-1 balun« supplied at no extra cost. 









UOO-l* iIMHj 
SB i»^ EC H H J 

1 f tf *. itm-ifsa JIT RL&o^4i*L i 



6P*eC4FICAnONS 

NOUIN^L IIVPIJT IMfilDANX:!. {APHHbTAHtH Pv-R* 

Bini V piA n f HQTii It it.H mj E 9-'i Ji" l» * uni i - 9" if\ > cm\ 
bLLUEMT EHH.'MAK k-lt Nt^fH aS'i'lt.Ba m1 I- I It "43 3i*[ 



A&aEUBLiTimimKT 
SH4PPfHaM(iHiiMT 

EE-1 ViiNDfiunV'IViL 
klEV£NTlt«CiVMaTCRkM, 



Huy^ 



49Lb» I » £9 Hal 
lO WFH iM^KPhl 



Now You Can Receive The Weak Signals With The ALL NEW 



AMK< 



PREAMPLIFIER 



>%t*6e\ FT-2 ift A cDiilirtuoiM tuning 6-160 
Bjeirr IVt-Amp ipeeifically dirfipwd for 
uat mth a tmiiAceirer. Tfie FT- 2 com- 
hinm the fmlure* tif tlit wrll-knuwn PT 
with iww eophitlttrutt^d control circuitry 
llut permitfl tl to bp ddded to virtually 
■ny lran»e*iv« willi No mtHJifir^lioii' 
Mck aaiauM ham isiui be w'ithtMJi iifie. 



• IsiproirTS 9rnaiti%i1)i and signal •tonow ratio. 
« Booatf «^nal« up to 26 dh. 

• For AM or S5il 
■ Bvp4#M^ Lt»e]| uuLomatically wh^n the transetlver is transmitting^ 

• PK r amplltler i^veg iiup«rior crtui* modulation protection. 

• Advanced solid -state circuitry. 

• if^implp to installx 

• [mpravei iinmunity to traiicerver front -cind oveiioAd by lue of ill built-in itlenuitqr. 

• iVoiidiF* muter powrr conlrol for ttalion equipmmt. 



MQOtL FT J 



$69.95 





Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • t617) 395-8280 




■I 




Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



BiRil 



The indispensable 
BIRD model 43 

THRULINE^ 
Wattmeter 



Read RF Watts Directry. 

O.4S-2300 MHz, 1-10,000 watts ±5%, Low Insertion 
VSWR-1.05. 

Unequalled economy and flexibility: FUiy only the 
element(s) covering your present frequency and power 
needs, add extra ranges later if your requirements 
expand. 




Table 1 

STANDARD 

ELEMENTS 

(CATALOG 

NUMBERS) 







Tf* qijpnc* Biind&iMH: 


D 




2' 


25- 


100- 


200^ 


^m^ 


10 


&0 


250 


500 


1000 


^ VkaUs 


_i 


\\ 


%i 


iO 


it 


in w.ittH 


— 


It) A 


m 


inn 


\0\i 


2S vvtitt^ 


— 


25A 


isc 


2^1 


i'^t 


5nw,iltN 


^OH 


snA 


^oc 


=iri[) 


'"tOE 


imwcitt-v 


KKIH 


1(M)A 


xmc 


KK1[> 


imiE 


2^0v.Mt^ 


ZiOH 


2'»0A 


2^a< 


2S(1D 


I'^m 


StXJwatt^ 


'lEXlH 


'»()(> A 


^i[xk: 


itKO 


^ilMlE 


KXXJ waif. 


MMJH 


HXK)A 


KICMK 


lOCXJD 


10U0E 


2300>\jiis 


2SmH 










500(1 v^^tH 


imilH 











MODEL PRICE 

43 $120 

Elements (Table 1)2-30 MHz 42 

Elements (Table 1) 25-1000 MHz 36 

Carrying case for Model 43 & 6 elements 26 

Carrying case for 12 elements 16 

($pccify_ry pc N or 5023? connectors ) 




^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^ Nowica Crystsls (S0«cif y Band Only) 

S^jJ^mOmURS Motfrola NT 220 Crystal^ 

^ CRYSTALS IN STOCK |n StOCk! 

|Siandard • Icom • Heathkit • ICen • Clegg • Regency •Wilson • VHF 
Eog •Drake • And Others! $4.50 @ Lifetime Guarantee 



Make /Model 


Xnnii Freq, 


Rec. Freq. 




ii 









































Q3D© j'fi"*^^ Ills 



THE mmm mmn^ nkvt and e^qmmercul baium im thi world iddat 




THI PIDVIM lALUN 
i™t^^.J£b 'inn 




MANDlit FUa 1 in HP iM^ tNLN U^nl Mm^ Imdrd J iMA lit 

HUPS TV\ PlOillUi ll| *r-,V,:ir,|; r:ipi linf f(|(llirllfln 

HQW All ir^lHLES^ Itin HAKDWARE r.^?]^ rtaifblb ^ilmt' i'^iled 

LMPRflVES !,'& HDTig III i:ei3ui.inE l^ani Linp ^'irh liiti 

lEF-UEES CLNIEH IN^UUT^B Wiin-I^nijt Mnirnna Pull Dl Qim tOiQ Uq. 

■UILMN LI4IIIIIIII& AIIIfrEI Itiipj FigNct llM - Cqiil^ JiHa Shc 

■ceji Viiujti* (Itt- 

HILTW WtKir WKM Mill Por Irmrtt^ I'm Hiiitikim Inttt^m 

Kmc u» IT III iMiWCiiii « in If Hint tvwai. ru. 

lU. CUL UHDLM HniiU KFT PUB mnUIH V iUQ TC 

HkllfU 

TiCVKWilTVUIT... 

8tG SIGNALS OONT JUST HUPPEN— 

Q3VE TDUft ANTENNA A BftfJ^K 






'^"'^ 






I: 



nvAi cnuMtf <i 



s^ 



IfetHI 

ink. 



*4 nt 



pA 1 



gB,f B^tJLC/iAMfll 



iw tit 



ll | l m ■^| pie0v rMi h*^ ■« spt **wh i^^i ' 




SERIES 31 —BNC CONNECTORS 

Amph^noTs BNC connectors are small, Ugbtweighl, weatherproof 
connectors with bayonet action for quick disconnect uppltfications. 
Shells, eoupUng rings and niale contacts are accurately nmcfained 
ftom brass. Springs are made of beFyUium copper All paits in turn 
;ire ASTRO plated® to give you eoiuiectOTs tbkt can taJte constant 
handling, high temper^CuFes and resist ftfarAsion. 



BNC BUIrKHEAD RECEP- 
TACLE 31 221.3S& UG'1094 
M«t€4 with any BNC plug- 
ReceptacJe can b« mounted 
into pAiiels up to 104^* thick, 
$1,25 

BNC (M) TO UHF (F> ADAP- 
TER a0»-2900-3e5 UG 255 
Adapts any BNC jack to any 
UHF plug. $3.63 
DOUBLE MATE ADAPTER 
S3-ft77-385 Both coupling 
rings are fuee turning. Con- 
nect! 2 female components- 
$2,72 

JACR ADPATER tl.dS 
575-102-3 B 5 Adapts 
83-1SP-385 to Motorola type 
auto antenna jack or pin jack* 
PANEL R E C E P T AC LE 
8 3-1B-385 S0239 Mounts 
with 4 fasteners in 21/32" 
diameter hole, $1,17 
PANFl. RECEPTACLE 
B:i-&7H*3a5 S0239SH Mounts 
in sin^e 21/32" diameter 
hole* Knurled lock nuts pre- 
vent turning. $1,59 
BNC ANGLE ADAPTER 
31-0Q9'3«5 UG-300 Adapts 
any BNC plug for riftht angle 
use. $4.23 

BNC TEE ADAPTER 
31^08-385 UG-274 Adapts 2 
BNC plugs to 314)03-385 or 
other female BNC lyp* recep- 
table. $4.56 



K^^ 



tlG-lO&4 




1TG.273 





83-677-S&& 



5t5>102-385 



BNC(F) TO UHF (M) ADAP- 
TER 31-028-385 UG*273 
Adapts anv BNC plug to any 
UHF lack. $2.39 
PUSH -ON 8 3-1 SF- 3 85 
83*5SP-385 Features an un- 
threaded^ springy shell to push 
lit on female conoectois- 
$2.27 

LIGHTN ING ARRESTOR 
575-105-385 Eliminates static 
biuld^up from antenna. Fro* 
tects your valuable equlpmeni 
aKain^t lightning damage- 
$4.80 

BNC PLUG 31-002-385 UG- 
88 Commonly used for com- 
munica lions antenna lead 
cables. For RG 55/U & RG 
58/U cables. $1.59 
BNC STRAIGHT ADAPTER 
31-219-385 UG-914 I 9/32" 
long, allows length of cables to 
be foined. Mates with BNC 
plugs, $2.12 

BNC PANEL RECEPTACLE 
31-003^385 UG-290 Mounts 
with 4 fasteners in 29/64'' 
diameter hole. $1.74 




PL-259 ... 90^/ 
UG-175 ( Adapt- 
er for RG 58U) 
. . . 234 



so 2 39 



SERIES 581 — PACKAGED CABLE ASSEMBLIES 

All popular leniiths are now avuilable in your choice of RG fi/U or RG 
58 /U type Jow loss polyfoam dielectric cable. Installed PL-259 connec- 
tors are ASTROplated — Amphenors new n on -tarnishing finish — which 
has all the advantages of precious metal plus more heat, corrosion and 
abrasion resistors that silver ever had! These cable assemblies are ideal for 
CB, ham radio and other communicatioiis antenna installations and they 

are ready for immediate use. ^„ ^ „, „**„„ „ -*^_ 

RG 8/U TYPE POLYFOAM 

COAXIAL CABLE ASSEM- 
BLIES 581-803 3-tl. with 
A ST R O plated P L-259 's on 
both ends. $93.71 
581-820 20-ft. with ASTRO* 
plated FLr259's on both ends. 
S 7,9 5 

581-850 50- ft. with ASTRO* 
plated PLr259^s on both ends,' 
$16.39 

581-875 7 5- ft. with Astro- 
plated PL^259*s on both ends. 
$21.10 

58 1-8100 100-ft, with 
ASTRO plated Pl^259*s on 
both ends. $26.49 
RG 58/U TYPE POLYFOAM 
UG-290 COAXIAL CABLE ASSEM- 

BLIES 581-5812 12*ft. with 
ASTRO plated PLr259*s on 
both ends. $4.19 
581-5820 20-ft. with ASTRO- 
plated PL- 2 59 's on one end 
and SPADE LUGS ON 
OTHER END. S4.15 
51 8-5820^2 20'ft. with 
A ST ao plated FL-259's on 
both ends. $4.89 
581*5850 50- ft. with ASTRO- 
plated PLr259's on both ends. 
S7.44 

581*5875 7&*fl. with ASTRO- 
plated Pl>259's on both ends. 
$9.28 

581*58100 lOO'ft, with 
A STR Opiated PLr259*s on 
UG-8ft UG-914 both ends. $10.76 



^ 



«^ J. 



50239SH 



^ 



UG»30€ 



- r"n 




tIG-274 



83.5SF-385 





UG-255 



O^ 



&75-105-385 




Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395 8280 




Now It's Crystal Clear 

Yk, nou 1COM helpi you steer cWn of all \he hasstr^ of chancifl oysfats. The nc^uj 
fC-22S i* ih* same surprisinig f*dio you\if come to krvow find \m.'^ as thr fC-22A, 
ej^cepi (h»i \i is lotalty crvstaJ uic)«pendent. Z«ro c:fv*t«l«, SoJw) staif engineering 
enaUe^ you to progiArn 23 crbarineJs of your chuice wilhoiif wailing,. Ndhf tht 
ICOM perfomiatite you've demanded conges wtth the convenience ^ou'v« tvant^p 

witu jfOLir new ic-225. Price: $299.00 



Hold it! 



'U\ke hold rif SSB ^ith the^ 
T.WJJ bwcoiil twina JCOM'S new jKirtabte IC-202 and 10-502 put it Wpithin 
yotti' reach wfhtrever ym are. Yoq can tiikt il with yuu to the hit] top. thi^ 
hiKhw-aya* or tht* beach. Thre* pirUibLi^ wait4^ PEP on two meltrH "r six! 

Hrlla, DX: Thf iCOM quality and eitcellent ncvh'ercharact?rutioafth{4 
pair Didke bulky cofsvTrtei? sfiii Jaw band rijl* Ufllwc%£5Br>- IW gettin|g 
iititrlfvl in SSBUVTIF You jujit ;idd your linear amp, jTytiiu wish, fionnect to 
the jtntecida. aad DX! Wilh thf 3fl2 you msi> lulk thi-oui^h OSCAE VI and 
VI If Even Irnnftceive with an "up" rt»ccivirig conv^rU^r* The IC'502, simi- 
larly, mjikeji uwe of six mtaere in wnyw that ^c3u frould huvt* aiwtiVH Uke^l but 
could ntver hjive be^u^l.^ In fsct. there ajit) so man>' thingta ta try. it's like 
opening a new bund. 

Take hold of Single Side Band Tnkt* hold ofmsiam exciLenkeiiL Taktr twio. 



VPO ■ RIT1 




VXO llJnlne ' 144 0. 144 5 - ? iviwti ' nm 






i*nti 




1C-24S Transceivfir 

The VFO F^evolution goes mobild with the unique, ICOM developed 
LSI synthesizer with 4 digit LED readout. The tC-245 offers the 
most for fnobtle an the market. The easy to tse tuning knob rnove$ 
accurately over 50 detent steps and assures excellent control as 
easily as steering the vehicle. With its optional adapter, the lC-245 
puts you into all mode operation on 12V DC power with a compact 
dash -mounted transcefver. In FM, the syrithesizer command fre- 
quency \s displayed in & kHz steps from t46 to 148 MHz, and with 
the side band adapter the step rate drops to 100 Hz fron^ 144 to 
t46 MHz. For maximum repeater flexibility, the transmit and 
receive frequencies are independently programmable on any separa^ 
tion. The IC'245 even comes equipped with a multipte pin Mqlex 
connector for remote controL The IC 245 is a product of the 
revolution in VFO design^ frorn its new style front panel, to its 
excellent mechanical rigidity and Large Scale Integrated Circuitry. 
Your IC-245 will give you the most for mobile. $499,00 




THE NEW ICOM 4 MEG, MULTI-MODE, 2 METER RADIO - IC 
211 

ICOM introduces the first of a great new wave of amateur radlo$« 
wkh now styling, new versatility, new integration of functions. 
You've never before laid eves on a radio like the IQ-211, but you'll 
recognize what you've got when you first turn the single-knob 
frequency control on this compact new model. The lC-211 ts fully 
synthesized in 100 Hz or 5 kHz steps, with dual tracking, optically 
coupled VFQs disptav^cl by seven segment LED readouts, providing 
any aplit. The IC-211 roils through 4 megahertz as easily as a 
breaker through the surf. With its unique ICOM developed LS! 
synthesizer, the IC-211 is now the best "do everything" radio for 2 
meters, with FM. USB, LSB and CW operation. $749*00 



Now ICOM I n t ro duce s IS Chamels of FM to Go! 

The New 10-215: the FM Grabber 

t 

Tlili is [COM'i hrsl FM portable . «nd k putf good tinrti on I he go, 
Chnngp I'chlclpt^. ufatk ihtmi^h ihr pATlc, cflimb n hilL nwA (COM quality 
f M CDOunuiiJitaliant go rigbt dong ifrith you L,v»ng EaElLng internal 
bfltttries mifct ^riAbk FM really- pQn«bl«. whik «ceiL»4bk k«iiitiet 
mtkr cnmnlofi to cutfiul povwr mnd antenna fa$i and tm^ 

Crab for QnibUMy wkh the new ICtlS FM poitable. 



Ftoni niDmiti.-(l contrDl* fli»d iop 
imiunltfid Aiilriinii 

• NaTTo* hHwt 1 1 SKH> — eo mpatfb k 
> IS rtiiBBiii Ul Oft <tol / 3 priot<lit 

• CompBlibta iiHHinf faslun for ll«xlbl« 
Atiltnna 

« Dual fwurtf (3 ttaat hlph / 4O0 mw low, 
nomiiU]} 

mad BK^tar 




Mm m 



«cai« 



Q^^ 



% ^ ^ 



jfWor S219.P& 



U rnvv* I 



I ■ * i i i i ri rmm 




Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 




Tufts Radio Etectronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 




model 333 
dumnriv load 
wattmeter 

FivoritB LigKtwei|ht Portiifale-250 WATT RATING- 

Air Gooltd 
Ideal held service unit im mob<le2 way fadio-CB, marine, 
bLiaina» ti^nd, Bs$i for QRP arr^teur use, CB. with z&o lo 
& watts \qH scale low powef range. 
• ifMeifteitiom 

ex: t9 300 MH2 

Imm nun 1 .3:lto 730 MHr 

250 wtttti Hr»rnHlT«nl 

0-5, 0-50, 0^125, o-^aso 

Sltn. 
$06^ 




VSftR 



|Pr«ttnvtv ftmgvf 
OannmctQt 

Prtn 




.model 374 cfumrny tODd w^ttm^ttr^ 

Ti»pof tht Lme-1500 WATT RATING-Oil Coolod 
Our highesi power comhinatiQn unit, Rated To 1500 watts 
pnput (irnermitientf Metai ranges are mdivduaiiy 
cahbraied lor highbest accuracy, 
• ipieflefttiofif 



vswn 



DC to 300 MHt 

Hm 13:1 1D330UHT 



Six* 

StK^img WlPighl 
Pri£ft 



1500 i»*tf5 DC mfprmitliint. 

0- 15. 0-50, 0-900. 0- 1SO0 

SO 239 [hwiMticaliy iMiwtJ 

41/4" nO" A 10-1/4" 

12 tM. 
$2151)0 




BARKER & WILLIAMSON, INC. 






Ed^ornY Htgh Pov»«r Loid-ISOO WATT RATlNtj- 

Oil Cooled 

rnocfel 384 dufnmv kud 

For high pcsvuer when all you r^aed is the *oad. 



sp^elfleMJoni 

Friqiitncv l^flnaa 






PC iQ 300 MHi 

Lm tlwn 1J:1 to 230 AKHc 

1500 Hfltti inTerm^f 1 rm , 

mMKitrmm liBSt limil . 
S0^23i 4 iMrvnflleaiv imIhII 

12it». 



Hiqb foww-1000 WATT RATING-Oil CooM 

model 334A dummy toMt vnttmaiEr 
Quf most popular cofrtiinaliCHi unit. Hand%& lutl aniaTeui 
pcwver. Meier fjnges indiv^udHv calibraiect, Cari be paired 
mourned. 
■ iptditi-aitiiiii] 

Fnqu*ncv RtFig* 

VSVVB 

Power HtnQ* 



Waltnwivr A 
tnpVt C4nn*Ct9r 
Siz* 

PrK* 



DC IP 300 VTHt 

L»u thifl 1 .3: 1 10 230 MHi 

1000 WA11& CM inter ni|ft«nl. 

m«4irriutn h*it limit. 

0- 10. 0-too. o-:»o. 0-1000 

S0239 CtvnwliulW SNitdl 

4-3/*" ■ f K HH/4^ 

12 let 
«174i)0 



LITTLE DIPPER 




fiwdtt i31A 

iTiniiflw dip m*tw_ 

PoriatJie RF single generaior, s^nal monnpr, or absorption 
wavemeter. Li^htweighi (1 pound, 6 ounces with all udiIs}, 
battery powered unK Is ideial *oif field u^ in testing 
transceivers, luning antennas, eic. Can also be used to 
measure capacity, inductance, clreuH Q. and other factors. 
Indispen&able for expefirnenters, ii is easily *ha itKMr 
v«fsalite irutrumeni in the shofu. ContmLLoys oovcta^e tforti 
2 MHiT 10 230 MKi in seven ranges 
Unit comisis of a transi&iof r/«d Rf dtp osciMaiot ani 
lOO-microampere nieter circuit Metsr circuii irtet a 
iingic-iransisior DC dririfilifier with g paiterii»cim«tEf m it% 
emiiim cirojit to conirp) metet sensitrvity A ^ipo^tion 
5i»de fAiich avmecis the n*ier orcuit io the ascrttatpr for 
dip rD^asurernents. to a diD^ lor absorption wevermeter 
{TSdk; miaasurefnenis, or p>fC^^Hics audio moduiaiion oi ttie 
RF Signal. 

Frequenciy di3f tias a caJttjFatod reierertce pomi lor and 
bandwidth measurements, fcwh coil has its own trequency 
diai there's no confusion with rnultipie rnafkrngs or small, 
hard to-read soaies near the [;«nter of thediaJ. 



■ fpecilicititMis 



2 MHt w 23C> MHi in 7 owrfaooinfl 
rangn &>y plm^in qdJ iTTJOfitltiat. 
2 MHf-4 mHl, A MHt-a Mitt, 

32 MH1-S4 MMe^ 50 MHr- 1 tO MIU, 
1lOCiHi-23DMK< 



Acdf^MV 


'3% 


MfidulJiiiMi 


^000Hf.7&%lo44|K 


Povnf 


9-vali ir^nvfiar batlwv. 
Butfin 2U6 pr M]yi«altnt 


Siir« 


7" k2 1/4" fc 2-1/2" 


Shippifig Wt^hl 


1 Uih. 6 Oi. 


WIDE RANGE A! 1 bNUATOR 




i*sd*l 3714 
Pygfect yowf receiver ot 1 4ViveTtet trqm ovefiudO, m pfQ4 



vide itep aitemdlion ot row4ewt RF signafi fr^^m signal 



[ 



genHBratprs^ preampltfi«rs^ Of conv^wss Seven rockerj 
SMrndies provide atterituai »on from 1 dB to 61 dB rn 1 d9« 
stepi Switches arc marked ifi d6. 1 2-3-5-10 20 20 Si^n o*| 
dctua!«d iRAfiid>es fiN position) grvm ati^iuai'on Wiff^ ^t 
S^itChs m OUT potiti«n, fh«re rs, I^Q iii»ri«on loss 
An«nuaior installs in coaKia^ Urm us^ng UHF oonnectors. 



itip«cifiC4tioni 

pDWHr Cjlil«CilV 
VSWH 
InijfMdlBncw 
Accuracy 

PfJCt 



1MiM»tl 

1.3:1 mmtinium. DC lo 226 MNv 

fU) ohm* 

0.1 iB/dB ±0.5 ftB, OC i<i 160 MHi 
0.1 A/dB - 1 .0 <iB, OC lA 22& MHf 

•'lfl"K 14/2- It 1-1/4" 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 3%^280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avmm • Med ford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 

^ ^ 

• Handle full 200 vans * low-low VS*W.R. ^ Deliver 3 cJB gain and mofe! * Pick the one that best fits your needs: 



Lnrsefi Kulrod 
flntennos 



MAGNETIC MOUNT 

stays put even at 
100 mph! 

MM-JM'150 for 144 MHz use\ 
MM^JM-220 for 220 MHz use 
MM-JM-440 for 440 MHz use 





I 



Only 
$38.50 

complete 



TRUNK LID MOUNT 

No holes and low 

silhouette too! 

TLM-JM-150 for 144 MHz use) Only 

TLM JM 220 for 220 MHz use $38.50 

TLM-JM'440 for 440 MHz use) complete 

And 1/4 wave antenna for trunk 
and magnetic mount — SI 8.50 



ROOF or FENDER MOUNT 
Goes on quick and easy 

in 3/8" or 3/4" with 

fewest parts. 
JM-l50Kfor144MHzuse 
JM'220'Kfor220MHzuse 
JM-440K for 440 MHz use 



A 




Only 
$31,50 



complete 

And 1 /4 wave antenna for roof and 
fender mounts $1 1 .50 



Ai>av& antennas a ft cpmptete wrrfi mounting hsrdw&re, coax, connector piug^ at fen wrench and complete mstructtons. 



_^n«l*rl T72 CLIPHEAMP, 




Gmr rn4xMliurn Iqal madiiUlinrl wiEhnu] danger Qf Uplnimr 

Sell- - 'I pfeamptilw ■ndcl4ppefltytrj»fi*tiii1(wi.. 

tMt>: ■ .-.•-^ ■ ... jvtlam^. 4ind tmt ifiBVClei mwli nd 
«'ht«rA*l vo m i t. 



COAXIAL ANTENNA CHANGEOVER RELAY 

modtl ^77 



Model 372 - $27.50 



Om mtrnt^mt 








Eoon o iTfcc H ma rciiaUt. Can DC opemtoi Irom vOx Ofcufi 
Ifif ctfi ffi tPiJ v luuvnciic o«Hraticri v trom PTT v rtomrtl 

' twp^ and! lem ^aparatmf o^fvn . 



Model 377 -$17.95 



■hwvit« wtiahf 



UHF Ti>0*K>2M' 

1ft. 



UNIVERSAL HYBRID COUPLER II PHONE PATCH 






Cuuwu ^e«if OitKM » 





tP4li;hin| Ifto H^tA^ Uk ItM Unm fnd Kv «(»' <«CIVdiA| «pk] 
curcu!! prowtB N)^ ett(rril«i.t VOX cptrHiiKirt of \tnt^vr* 

if uwd M itiD iiiitiQri MiK-iofjrigrk?. <Th@ CompTv^mp ril3o 
functioru M a prBBmpllliirj'liniilHr wiin thi lunion 
miaootiont. it d«£rtedJ 



BARKER & WILLIAMSON, INC. 



Model 359 - $37.50 





Model 300 2W with Compremip 

-$125.00 




Model 300 TW without Compresmp 

— S85,00 



COAXIAL SWITCHES AND ACCESSORIES 



TiwippfH 


m 


■9 jUa Mm 

h4 «*^ni 




TwvHaei 


mfl" 


QJS ■n^utiiii 




Uxv 




nw .i7i/r'K3" 


Ehlpp^ W*l|ht 


iriab*. 




^•WW 




i^mua*^. 


■wiiMiiia 




Or vm it wilA' VOW !■■» ttawt^ or pubUc 
lyilvn hji ti ntp i Lw^] |iiffteitrh«*wii^. TlNi Mio-fAq^. 

flJI typm of IfirnrnKEtarl. Pi^wrtvit^ by Jl long-lailmq ijry-^pl 
tsatleiy-nCii (tMEnrnal pciwiir mlMdid, Irifta^l^ will'^LJl AHV 
wiri-ng chungfis in >'mjr trsriimiKm, Just ofwnnjul iN 
Cff/fwvwiwTVP batween vour niter aphore (l>DXlClO-DfiiiTi 
tfynjrnic « ihlgh-impeclaricH cerntlicJ ind VPur irBflwnrtWi 

l«p^ 4 KJjmtttM, too. 




IfWan Li 
DTitpuH Ltrti 



I VP'Bifnt! 



sm 



1 ■mtiniw I* 10 

flO n4iHNra4ti 



fpr sntvtna iclvcfion ii^ RF fwiithtn^ 



T)^ PH^3-4u)MtTv M^Tt^HH h** ^EHt tnt vatamu tvr the 

'irHdlutf^fV f^ vcainl C«r«miC 5wi tftwt wnii lJ>V«r4llOV t^n 
Tiii'K jM silucr-ptJlil'lEl EinndiJctori qrvr LiniMiriWd ip«rF<Tr 
riHrw-ii »nd rfiliaLiilitv from auctrfi- (rBUijanc^w |q ^50 MH/. 

Ieh a fv^plA, #«j VSMR it !«& ihvi t J 1 u^ wa 1^ 



COAXIAL SWITCH SELECTOR CHART 



Oowtilh lfn€sur«d 4K 30 MHf I « -i^ dB ti«1wM*rt atfcotfii 
OulrfitH »n4 €D dS tMlvMwn ■horndeoulleli. 

f^ixte^i, arc ausilFibln IflF dHlh. , 'wttrl . t» piUtl rrtftunf inq, ind 
WiTF^ tit w^^haut prOEocTiM^ grDunding a' iiiii.liv4 nuTpuEs, 
nid>4l tud^e-n^h-inlHdll tw*mii:isjJ model'i iJin bn«ithnrw34l 
C3I panil ntOuftma. «Kill |b«Ckpl«te-nicivntcid1 conne{;tof 
tTudtH««« lor poTiRl mtiunirar^ ciniv, awa pwwi 

Ml* ttw Bslnctar ch*1 bffow tb chOM* 

riMd 



tf« n»d*ti rou 








PRICE 


diitthm 


C4f>r««tor 




McHjntmg 




Aiitorruiitc 


D4I 
Pll1« 




Modal 


Parwl 


WalF 


Oeife 


fltrrwrkl 


3?e 


18.9S 


6 


AkI^I 


K 






X 


Supplied 


PROTAX siiv»icl^. Gfoufidl all ekcept 5el«l«d 
output eircuu. 


3?6 


18.95 


5 


Hadial 


k 


n 




X 


Su0pii«d 


PflOTAX tvvitch. Ground >aM except seleciwj 
DuipLfT cirfuM. SiKih swtrch position firoundi 
mtf aulpjK. 


&60A 


14.00 


5 


Radial 


X 


X 






DP b 




5SaA7 


12,50 


2 


Radial 


» 


k 






DP 2 




5&1A 


17.50 


2 


RaaiBi 


It 


K 






OP-2 


■wiicn anv HF ditvF« m or our grf «ns 
ctHirvcrton m jcoavidi hn« See f^qvife ff^vcfL 


566 


,95 


— 


— 




X. 






- 


Br«ck<'l cniY^ for w^ii mDuntirio at fadi«i 


no 


1 7.95 


5 


Axial 


% 








OP 5 




G§OG 


17.95 


5 


Axial 


> 






w 


SuppliiflJ 


Grauf^f All BKcept sejeclnd output circuit. 


592 


16.50 


2 


Al«i3l 


X 








DP2 




&9S 


18.50 


6 


lriNlliri« 




a , 


K 


V 




GfouneJ* all e»i-enr viacied ouTput tirtuis. 



M)dil 376 




M>d«l WaA2 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (6171 395-8280 




Tllfts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue « Medford MA 02T55 • (6171 395-8280 





There is no substitute for quality, performance* 
or the satisfaction of owning the very best. 

Hence, the incomparable Hy-Gain 3750 Amateur 
transceiver. The 3750 covers ail amateur bands 
1 ,8 30 MHt ( 1 60- 1 meters). It utilizes advanced 
Phase-Lock*Loop circuitry with dual gate MOS 
FETs at all critical RF amplifier and mixer stages. 
There's a rotating dial for easy band-scanning and an 
electronic frequency counter with digital readout 
and a memory display that remembers frequencies at 
the flip of a switch. And that s just the beginning. 

Matching speaker unit (3854) and complete 
cxiernal VFO (3855) also available. 

Seethe incomparable Hy-Gain 3750 at your radio 
dealer or write Department MM* There is no substitute. 



Tv^Tv 






3IW-*s^.9S 



3790 - SlB^.OO 



3KS -^ S436.DQ 



There is no substitute. 



AmAteur FUdIo Systems. 



Super 

3-£kmGnt Thundprliird 
for 10. 15 and 20 MtHers 
M€>de|TH3Mk3 — S199.d5 

Hy-Gain * Syp» 3-*temtfii 
"nujdndcfbtrd deiivra outstisfi^fi^ pcifoirfv 
ance on 10> 15 and 20 mrteff. The 
TH3Hk3 features separ^ie and mMched 
H>--QlrApsfDr<^achlMnd dndle«d%wrth52 
ohm coajL H^-Gain Betj* Match presents 
tAper^d im|?edance fof most efficient 
3 bijnd matching, and provides DC ground 
to eliminate precipitation static. The 
TH3J^k3 dedveri majcimLiiri F/B ratio, 
and SWR less than 1.5; I at resonance on 
ail bands lis rrkec^iankally supenor 
conitruction features' taper swaged slotted 
tubing tot e^y adjustment and lurger 
dtflrrKter. Comes equipped 'MAh heavy 
tillable boom4ei^fTHKt clamp. Hy-Gain 
fcmle balun &N-66 b recommended fair 
use *«h the TH3«k3 



E]cc{ric«l 


TMOKN 


THSMia 


Gam — average 


&7dB 


BdB 


Front-to -tvAck TMio 


25dB 


25dB 


SWR (at re^nanc^) 


Le^s than 


LesA than 




15:] 


]. 5 ! 


Impedsnce 


50 ohms 


50 ohms 


Power raimg 


tAaii legal 


Max legal 


Mech^nkal 






Longest etement 


3iJ' 


27- 


Boom k?ngth 


24' 


14' 


Tuming radtus 


20' 


15.7' 


Wind Ided at BO MPH 


i5^(b^ 


1032 lbs 


Hgjumum wind survival 


100 «PH 


100 MPH 


net wngM 


57 lbs. 


3€lbi 


^^B$t diamelef accepAed 


1 %^ \o 2W 


1V*'Uj2^^ 


Surface «rea 


&1 sq. ft 


4-03 sq. fL 



6-Elemeiii Super Tbtmder- 
bvd DX for 10, 15 and 20 

Meters Model TH6 DXX 
$249.95 Separate HV-Q 

traps, fealuring lar^e 
diameter coils that de\Tk>p 
an exci^ption«iUy favorable 
L/C ratio and very hi&h Q* 
provide pitak performance 
on each band whether 
workiriE phone or CW. 
Estdlusivt" Hy-Gain b<;tii 
match, f^ictory pretuned, 
insures maximum gain and 
F/B ratio without com* 
promise. The TH6DXX 
feeds with 52 ohm coaxial 
eable aud d skivers less than 
1.5:1 SWR on all bands, 
MechsmicaUy superioj: con- 
structtoEi features taper 
swaged « ^Jotted tubing for 
easy adjustment and re- 
ad] usttnent, and for larger 
diameter and less wind 
loading. Full circuinference 
compression clamps 
replace self*tappit\g sheet 
metal screws. Includes 
large diameter, heavy gijiugo 
aluminum boom, hca^T 
cast aluminum boom^to^ 
mast clamp, and hea\ir 
gauge ma chine formed ele- 
ment-to 4|Oom brackets. 
Hy -Gain's ferrite balun 
BN-86 is recommended for 
use writh the TH6DXX- 




HY GAUMS INCOMPARABLE 

HY-TOWER 

FOR SO THRU 10 METERS 

Model ISHT 

• Outstanding Omni -Directional Performance 

• Automatic Band Switching 

• In.stalls on 4 sq. ft. of real estat«^ 

• completely SeJf -Sup porting 

By any slandHifd of m*»nsuifement, the Hy-Towcr is unques- 
tionably the finest multi-band verticaL antenna system on Lhe 
marki^t today. Virtually indestructible* the Model 18HT 
featuref^ automatic band selection on 80 thru 10 meters 
tbroU|th the use of a unique stub decoupling system which 
effectively isolates va^rtaiis sections of the antenna so thmi an 
electrical U waveleiigth Cor odd multiple of a % wavelength) 
exists on all bands* Fed with 52 ohm coax> it takes maximum 
legal power . . . delivers outstandmi^ performance on all 
bands. With the addition fff a base loading coiL it also delivers 
outstanding performiance on 160 meters. Structurally, the 
Modfl 18HT is built to last a lifetime. Eugfied hot-dipped 
£alvani7.ed 24 ft, tower requires no guyedsupports. Top 
mast, which e^ctends to a height of 50 Ft,, is 6061 ST6 tapers 
alumitium. AH hardwaro is iridite treated to MIL iipeps. ff 
youVe looking for the epitome in vertical antenna svstems^ 
you'll want Hy-Tower^ Shpg. Wt., 96.7 lbs. Order No, 182, 
Price; $279,95 

NEW Special hinged base assembly on Model 18HT allows 
complctf assembly of wntenna at ground level . .. permits 
easy raising and lowering of the antenna^ 



BROAD BAND DOUBLET BA1.UN 

Uft 10 thru SO meters 
Model BN-E6 
S 15.95 

The model EN ^6 balun provides optimum balance 
of power to both sides of any doublet and vastly 
improves the transfer of energy from feedline to 
anteruia. Power capacity is 1 KW DC, Features 
w«aibefproof construction and built-in mounling 
brackets. $15.95 Shpg, W|. 1 lb. Order No. 242 




A, 

u 



MULTI-BAND HY^ TRAP DOUBLETS 
Hy-Q Traps 

• Install Horizontally or as Inverted V 
■ Super-Strength Aluminum Clad Wire 

• Weatherproof Center and End Insulators 

Installed horizontally or as an inverted V, Hy-Gain doubleii with 
Hy-Q traps deliver true half wavelength performance on every 
design frequeney. Matched traps, individually pretuned for each 
band feature large diameter coils that develop an exceptionally 
favorable L^C ratio and very high Q performance. Mechanically 
superior solid aluminum trap housings provide maximum protect 
tion and suppoTt to the loading coil. Fr-d with 52 ohm uoa?c, 
Hy-Gain doublets employ super-strength aluminum clad single 
stTand steel wire elements that defy deterioration from salt water 
atid smoke . ■ ■ will not stretch . . . withstand hurricane-like 
urinds. SWR less than 1.5:1 on all bands. Strong, lightweight^ 
weatherproof center insulators are molded from high impact 
cyolac. Hardware isiridate treated to MIL spt^cs. Heavily serrated 
7-inch end insulators molded from high impact cycolac increase 
leakage path to approximately 12 inches* 

MODEL 2BDQ for 40 and 80 meters. 100' X0>^'* overall. Takes 

maximum legal power^ Shpg. Wt., 7,5 lbs S49.95 

Order No. 3&0 

MODEL 5BDQ for 10, 15, 20, 40 and 80 meters. 94* overalL 

Takes maximum power. Shpg, Wt,* 12,2 Ibfi, $79.^5 

Order No, 383 




CENTER INSITLATOR 

Band Doublets Model CI 



for Multi- 



Strong lightweight^ weatherproof 
Model CI is molded from high impact 
cycotac. Hardwar^^ is iridite trettted to 
MIL specs* Acccpt,s W* or Vt* coaxial. 
Shpg. Wt., 0,6 lbs, $5.95 Order No. 
155 



MULTI-BAND ANTENNA 

Dipole Antenna — Model Dl V-Sa 

$13.95 

For 10 thru SO meters — choice of one band 

A dipole antenna for the individuals who prefer the "do4t<your~ 

seLf^^ flexibility of custom -designing an anleruia for your specific 
needs. (Work the frequencies you wish In the 10 through 80 
nieters bands). 

The DIV-80 features: Durable Cop per weld wire for grealer 
strength, Mosley Dipole Connector (DPC-l) for RG-8/U or 
RG-58/U coax and aU the technical information you wiD need to 
construct yuur custom ^esign^d antenna. 




END INSULATORS for Doublets Model El 

Rugged 7 -inch end insulators are molded from bi^ Impact 
cycolac chat is heavily serrated to increate leakage path to 
approKimatelv I 2 Inches. Available in pairs only. Shpg. Wt** 0^4 
lbs, S3.95 Order No. 156 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (6171 395-8280 




ALL NEW 
3-BAND, 
2 ELEMENT 
HY-QUAD 



■ Mghn qb itihcT (iuufK iihuLiilbtct 

■ rumifili^lir niTrliJn|r!r!'»c IrK h-uy 

■ Hiuli ill I' II Hill. I"* whul l"MiJ 
Titf llv-Uui«l Injiii Hvtilill mi^kci dLI ■^iUvr qiitlilR^jbialBlii': llttrh *l!|F 

Finl^ II '¥ llir nirlv ^luid t^wi rk i' \A^tr ThriF n nOThmg mvir in «liipfi Iti 

«r baif. 

Scnflldly, H It idilli^itdii drr^HPril ^f thul »» aTfic nmr^ ^11 u| ihr inrTMiuiH 
undE'Br^lilc frji*irr>mlKrm3 in quads 

.-^Tk 4II *lHilimilt1] «tU{.1ICe IU}-» up! 11w VH|i£ Iced liSP pv(i tlmman4 liMppr 

H!r <;»»'■ ■« Pr^ Itr-Qti-id *ai niti^^ #lt mit=M^ ifiudi hi r«Bf il'b^^ffn.nd 
<« «i |«( IIM. tlkv Mr-QMli m K« M'i. KtPrrwF a\ ^aOtftHt ll t 111* tirii 
^BJ l« Itow fiOyCk^: tftrtttrt i.h fci«M» tip>i miaifiikt elrL-im <! pi^kri 
vdJi C^nite '^ — / iTV-^nd ^ vl«iM*l iumi «■» Mi h iiiifjii»4_tt<i 

Fw ^ ttor« ta^i / M^fikhrf l i i^b4 ^b^ HMftei mm n«4l IbMi ^Mfe 
Hv-Ciui ctfliitne «h9iex Ceeri ,' lull «■*« tliHaM fampi rsfs** mt i^ntat 
Mifl>, mpk N wJi lii «i •» faflliiH ^ In*^^ 4t^r mfrham i n i CMwmci tni at 

t-itn huTjr ^ii KiinE^ bmm-lit-BBtt ebinp llml titm ntd miaUt'CM* hit 
Bill 1^*" to iZi^^' in dui^AB / itiinibiiin ilnndcd vn. Vuu earn u|hei> jikI 
dnu Etw Nuib *tlN IhJiinteniu. If nn'n ■ cprtv nt:K l!l« thrUI a\ tttl OK. 

Order ^fo, 244 PrPQo-S2t9,t6 



3wa4i Iwqltt o* ktMWiMr^ 




JHfldApffitlfK) 



5 PEC m CATIONS 

13 G' li^m ranpHSvice 

&A911 K 



I'I^Idi' 






The Versatile Model 18V '(^r &C) thru 10 Meiers 

Tfa« W»i^( If^V \ma tEiw-c4:»l, hi|£ltl> irnkwiil vrFtK^I dcif^nnit tiUt Call b« 
LunMJ' 111 mjr hartd fK) Lhru EtF nutrtrri hjr a fftcnpti! Jit]|fUKlinvnl at llw 

feiHl (loinl on ihr fnaldning N*i- i»»iiU4^[i»r Fvii uttih -Vi ohm ttm^. thr» 1H 
fi nvliaUjr jfl uitin^tirittty ti!ii-i4^Eii Tur DH ur locetL mnliift (.'iin»l:rui-leid uE 
h^flvy 1(11^4(1' iiliiimnum luhiniu, lhi^M<iH.»'l tHV miiy Iv (iiwlHlli'tl nn ji nhurl 
]^ inifi nuLHl [LriVH-M artt:? tht'^riiurrd 1l in iiIkd Qidavtulvk' 1ii t\rft 'ir Vttvivr 
wnuTiiinn HluIiIji' portaliSr, I hi' Mciilrl l#V fsin hrqgirkly khurkH cjmfcti in 
■n ci%ifr«]| li*ii|{|h arfr Et and p«iii4)' iv^aMlrfnbli.'d fvr 4!icld davp h nd Cutnipifi}; 
tti|M Sht«)i Wt H LiH 



WIDE BAND VERTICAL 
for 80 - 10 Meters 
Hy-Gain'sl8AVT/WB 

Tak« th« wide band, omni^iircction^l perfonnanixr 
of Hy Gain's ramous 14AVQAVB. add BO m£?tGr 
capability ptus emra-heavj duty construction -and 
you bave ih€ unrivallt?d new 18AVT/WB. In dthiT 
words, you have quite an antenna, 

■ Automatic switching, five* band capability IB ac- 
compli a bed through the use of three beefed- up 
Hy-Q traps {featuring large diameter coiU that 
daveJop an eitceptionaJly favorable L/C ratio j. 

• Top loading coiL 

• Acroes-the-band performance with just one fur- 
ni^ied setting for each band UO through 401. 

• True 1/4 wave resonance on all bands^ 

• SWR of 2: 1 or less at band edges^ 

• Radiation pattern has an outstandingly low 
angle whether roof top or grtrund mounted. 



CONSTRUCTION . . . of extra-heavy 
duty tapered swaged seamleefi i^lumi- 
num tubing with fulJ circumference, 
corrosion resistant compresision 
clampa at sbttedi tubing joints, is so 
rugged and rigid that, although the 
antenna is 25' in height, it can be 
mounted without guy wires, using a 
12' double grip mast brackets with 
recessed coax connecter. 

Order No. 386 Price: S97-0O 




For 10, 15, and 20 Meters 
New Hv^ain R^del 12 AVQ 



Completely self-supporting, the Model 12AVQ features Hy-Q traps... 12" double- 
grip mast bracket,,, taper swaged seamleaa aluminum construction with full cir- 
cumference compression clampa at tubing joints. It delivers outstanding low angle 
radiation. SWR is 2;1 or less on all bands. Overall height is li3'6". Shipping weight 
7.2 ibs. Price: $47.00 Order No. 384 



New. improved successor to the world's most papular vertical 
Hy-Gain Model 14 AVQ/WB for 40-10 Meters. 

*Wide band performance with one setting (optimum settings for top performance furntshed) 
# Mew Hv-O Traps * New 12" Oouble-Grip Mast Bradcet ^ Taper Swagged Seamless 
Aluminum Con struct ion 

The Mcxiel 14A\"Q WB. new improved sucre&wr to the world famous Mixlf 1 I4AVQ, is a self.'iuppcirting. 
automatic band switebmg verticsil tbitt dehver^onmi-directianal perfprmrtnce on 40 through 10 meters. 
Three fieparate Hy-Q Irap^ feiituririg large diameter coils thiit d^vt?Lop an estceptionally favorable L/C 
rati** iind a very high Q. provide peak pedbrmance by t'ffecttvely isolating strcttons? tif the antenna so 
that a true 1/4 wave rcijonance exiiitH tin nil bands. OuLsttindrngly low angle radiHlifin pattern makes 
DX iind tiilher lonji haul contacts easy. Siif>eriar mechiinktil fuHtures include solid aluminum houpiins 
for Imps ufling^ air divlectrit capafilnr .ht^avy gauge taper swaged seamlci^M aluminum radinlnr ,.full 
circumference compression clampi^ at tuhini^ joints that iin* resistanl lo corrtiKion and wear... and a 12' 
doiihif-^rjp mast bracket that inBures maximum rigidity whether roof4«p or ground mounted, The 
Model 14AVQ/WH also delivers enct^llent performance on SQ meters usinu Hy-Gain Mf»dt*l Lt'-BOQ 
Loading Coil. Overall height is IS feet Shipping weight 3 2 Ib^. Unsurpassed portability., outiitand- 
ing for permanent ini^tuMation^i. Price: S67.00 Order No. 385 

TfPICAt MAVa^WB VSWR CURVES 



30 

t s 
Iff 



2ft£ 



iB^ 



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nt 



ail 2tD 

Mi Mitti4 



m 



."J 4 



?»« 



JfT 



t'OO 







1 








1 i 





^ >> 9- -^ -^ I 


*,_^__^ 










■^ ^ '^ "^^^ 


, 




1« 



71 



2- i 



li-y 



?1 3 



f1 4 



1\ 'j 



sra 




« MtTEH 



ROOF MOUNTING KIT^ Model URMQ provides rugged support for Model 14AV0/We. 

Order No. 184 Price: S24.95 



Hy-Cain REEL TAPE PORTABLE DIPOLE 
for 10 thru 80 Meters Model 18TD 

The most portable high peitomiance dipole ever... 

Tht; .Mudvl JSTP i» tiTuijiiiu-,!^ ,, .ii.irilv the mtMt (oolpnt^ hi^h pnrformitnft jnrtiiblr 
doublet nttk'ntitt ayatc^m Ever dcwliiped It has proven invsluabtlc in proveding 

rcliiibli' cnrriTrLrniiracitiJiiH tn viial miliUiry and U[m)iri,«trc^iil-Applic!jnL.iii!:4 through' 

imt Lhf world. Twu aLainieiiii pitwl laptis, cahbrau^d m mwl«rm. yniHnd CrtirrJ either 

;4id(! i£ the rnuir hoiisini;; up tu u totui diEitaTim t)t Wi TiVL n>r 3.5 mc (^pcrnUnn 

£6 rt, lf*nj^hii nf po]yi>r(ipyipne ropo attached t^ pmK Iwfw* permiUi inBtolliiLion 

tfl poli^n, irtKfl, buJldingii...whutL-vii]' j^ avalEahk fat Uyrmitig a donhifA an^liiui Mynlem. 

Ibtiigruunl in Ihe hiyh kmpMcJ hrjufliTig i« a frut^^UflrKiy U> \p.n0h p^nv^rtlion diar( 

oUi^ntfd Ici met£r □MaiiiiiivmmL* em ihs Lapm,. mjikeft iniilalia.iiQn fcnlpFDor Peed* with 

52 ohm OQMK [Xt1iv,trB ouistanding pnibmuiicr ■■ ■ partablit or pprmflufnt inttBlLBtioo- 

Mfcuunw LU&SV«Ex2 iiiche* ninctcd WL^ 4_1 Um. 





2)en^6n^MLA'250o $799.50 

DenTron Radio has packed all the 
features a Nnear amplifier stiouid 
have into their new MLJ\-25Q0. 
Any Ham who works tt can tell you 
tha MLA-2500 really was built to 
make amateur radio more fun. 



ALC Circuit to prevent overloading 

160 thru 10 meters 

1000 watts DC input on CW^ RTTY or 

SSTV Contmuous Duty 
Varfabfe forced air cooling system 
Self-contained continuous duty power supply 
Two ElMAC flB75 external anode ceramic/ 

metal triodes operating In grounded grid 
Covers MARS frequencies without modtftcations 
50 ohm Input and output impedance 
Built-in RF wattmeter 
117V or 234V AC 50-60 hz 
Third order distortion down at least 30 db 
Frequency range: 

l.SMHZ (1.8-2.5) 3.5MHz (3.4-4. 

7MHz (6.0-9,0) 14MHz (11.0-16. 

21MHz (16.0-22.0 28MHz (28,0-30,01 
40 watts drive for 1 KW DC input 
Rack mountmg kit available 119** rack] 
Size: 5V?" H X 14" W x 14*' D Wt. 47 tbs. 



:§] 



^ipo <^oromunicaticms 



TROUBLE FREE TOUCHSTONE ENCODER 




POSITIVE TOUCH IKEYSD^^RESSmW^OBILE^HAMDHEtO 
DESK MOUNT « HB POTTED PARTS (SERVICEABLE) 
MIL. SPE€, COMPONENTS « NO RFl • SELF CDNTAINEO 
XTAL CQNTROLLEO • LEVtL ADJUSTABLE FROM FRONT 

fit. Ptn-d. 

M i«iiHb ll I'pr nuxintt**g lii ^tf^itm iHKtIilMtitl 'frixn iha rair mbIJi lriijl«lii« ivsterm mlrrliKtl 
|W«««I 1*11 *4uinrnmt, **: 



2.5 



PP 1 





PP-2 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • i617) 395-8280 







Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



C - LINE AMATEUR EQUIPMENT 






DRAKE 



COMMUNICATIONS RECEIVERS- 




Drake R-4C 



Solid State Lmear permeability-tuned VFO with 1 
kHz dial divisions^ Gear driven dual circular dials. 
High mechanical, elactrical and iemperatu re sta- 
bility. 

Covers hann bands with crystals Jurnished. 
Covers all of 80, 40, 20 and 15 met^r$. and 28. 5- 
29.0 MHz of 10 meters. 

Covers 160 meters with accessory crystal In 
addition to the ham bands, tunes any fifteen 500 
kHz ranges between 1 .5 and 30 MHz, 6,0 to 6.0 
MHz not recom mended. Can be used for MARS, 
WWU CB, Marine and Shortwave broadcasts. 

Superior selectivity: 2,4 kHz a-pola filter pro- 
vided in ssb positions. 6.0 kHz, 6 pole selectivity 
for a-m. Optional 8-pole fitters of .25* .5. 1.S and 
6lO kHz bandw^dlhs available. 

Tunable notch filter attenuates earners within 
passband. 

Smooth and precise passband tynir^. 

Transceive capability: may be used to trans- 
cerve with the T 4X, T-4XB or T-4XC Transmitters, 
Illuminated dial shows which PTO is iri use. 

Usb, Isb. a-m and cw on all tiands. 

Age witti fast attack and two release times for 
ssb and a-m or fast release for break-in cw. Age 
also may be switched off. 

New high efficiency accessory noise blanker 
that operates in all modes^ 

Crystal [attice filter in first t-f prevents cross- 
modulation and desensitization due to strong ad- 
jacent channel signais. 

Excellent overload and inteftnodulatlon char- 
actefistics. 

25 kHz Calibrator permits working closer to 
band edges and segments. 

Scratch reststani epoisy pamt flniali. 
Price: S599. 00 




Drake T-4XC 



Solid State Linear per n^eability* tuned VFO with 1 
kHz diaf divisions. Gear driven dual ctrcutar dials. 
High mechanical, etectncal and temperature 
stability. 

Covers ham bands with crystals furnished. 
Covers all of 80, 40. 20 and 15 meters, and 28-5- 
29.0 MHi ot 1 meters. 

Covers 1 60 meters with accessory crystal. Four 
500 kHz ranges in addition to the ham bands plus 
one fixed'frequency range can be switch- 
selected from the front paneL 

Two B^po^e crystal lattice filters for sideband 
selection- 

Trangcelves with the R-4, R-4A, R-4B, R'4C and 
SPR*4 Receivers. Switch on the T-4XC selects 
frequency control by receiver or transmitter PTO 
or indepefidently. Iliuminated dral shows which 
PTO is in use 

Usb^ Isb, a-m and cw on alt bands. 

Controlled-carner modulation for a-m is com- 
patible With ssb linear amplifiers. 

Automatic transmit- receive switching Sepa- 
rate VOX time^delay adjustments for phone and 
cw, VOX gain is independent of microphone gain. 

Choice of VOX or PIT. VOX can be disabled b'^ 
front panel switch. 

Adjustable pi network output. 

Transmitting age prevents flat-topping. 

Meter reads relative output or piate current 
with switch on load control. 

Built-in cw sidetone. 

Spotting function for easy zero- beating. 

Easily adaptable to RTTY. eittier fsk or afsk. 

Compact s«ze: rugged construction. Scratch 
resislant epoxy paint flnisti. 

Price: S599.00 



Power Suppli 

Power SupfilteB forT-4, T-AX. T-4XB or T-4XC (The AC-4 
can be housed m an MS-4 speaker cabinet). 

Model No. 1501 Drake AC^ SI 20,00 
Model No. 1505 Drake DC"4 $135.00 



Accessories 




Drake MS-4 

Drake MS-^ Malchinji Sp«tker for y&e with H-4, R-4A, 
R'4B and R-4C Heceivefs (Has spact to tioiise AC'3 
and AC^ Pdwttr Su|}p1ies) 

Price: S30.00 



DRAKE MICROPHONES 

Wlirsd lor uu wfth Drake lrafisrnFtt«rs nrvd transceivers, for 
alther put^-to-lalk or VOX, Type of Dperaiipn 4s determined by 
th» VOX ti0n\m sorting of the tmnimui&r 

DetkType Model No. 7075 

* iyp#: HMvy Outy Caramrc Dwk 
Top « Cabt*^ Four FodU ^- 
CorK^uctof Qnm Shtekl • Output 
La^al; Minu$ $A dB (0 6% = 1 
voit/microt»r) • FnKpwncf R»^ 
poiiHr; BO-TOOOHx * Switch! rk^; 

^^ Prices 539.00 

HBnc»41«lcl Typ« M^d«l No 7072 

G<kO, 1 ihilMK!, Coil Com • Cn«: 
Cycolac « Flnlfth; QtVf > Oulput 
Lvnl; Mmui 65 (tB 10 dB = 1 voM/' 
nticrobar} * Frwiuaney n*«pon««* 
300-300D Hi • SwUcMng: Adapts ia 
^rthgf pu&h'TO"T9lk or VOX. 

Price: $19.00 






Drake SPR-4 - $629,00 

■ Programmable to meet specif 
requirements: SWL, Amateur^ 
Laboratory, Broadcasl, Marine Radio, 
elc, 

• Direct frequency dialing: 1 50-500 kHz 
plus any 23 SOO kHz ranges, 0.5 to 30 

- FET circuitry, all solid dtate 

• Linear diel, 1 kHz readout 

• Band- widths for cw, S9b, a-m with 
built-in LC filter 

• Crystals supplied for LW, seven SW, 
and be bands 

« Notch filter 

• Suift-in speaker 




Drake DSR-2 - $2950,00 

• Continuous Coverage 
10kHzto30MH2 

• Digital Synthesizer 
Frequency Control 

• Frequency Oisptayed 
to100H2 

• AM Solid State 

• A-ni» Ssti, Cw, HTTYf Isb 

• Series Balanced Gate 
Moise Blanker 

• Front End Protection 

« Optional Features Available 
ofi Special Order 




Drake FS-4 

Digital Synthesizer - S250.00 

Tht new &oi«l state Drake 1^3-4 Synthesizer opens the 
dcxK to 4 new woiid of continuou^tuning s^rt Mrave* 
Combines synrh^^t^ed general coverage flexibility witti 
ttia ieleidi^ty. slii^tity. frequvncy roadout an<i retiat^ih 
iiy of th^ Drake FMC or SPfi*4 Receivers. 



* tntiftac^ii wrtth an R-4 «*nw tmcmvm% wnQ t-4X senss trmnt- 
IfUmrs (R-4, R^4A. R4e fl-4C SPfM. T-t. T-4X. T-4)SB in0 
T-4JCC). without: modrhCfttiOfi ■ MHz rmtt^ is s«c on ¥^-4 with 
liHr r4*dout UKen frorn raoalwr dl«l, * Cocnptete garwral 
cowaQft — net ranga erysuiis to Duy • T-4rT'4X san95 trinsmi^ 
I4fs trwnoatvf on any FS-4 Iraqiitncy, v^her^ used wilh R-h4 
MrtM r*c«ivfM's. - RA«d^u{ 1 kHz wlih Drtka PTO. 

Prica; $250.00 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (6 17 J 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • {617 ) 395-8280 



• Remote 

« Mo for 
Contfoifed 



RCS-4 





COAX ANTENNA 
SWITCH 



Control unit works on 110/220 
VAC, 50/60 Hz. and supplJes 
necessary DC \o n\o\ot. 
Excellent for single coax fe^d to 
mulfiband quad$ or arravs of 
mo no banders. The Uve pc si lion 5 
ftllqw a single coax teed to *hr*e 
beams and two dipoles^ dr olfief 
similar combinations. 
Control catil@ fnoi aupptitd) 
same at for HAM-M rotator 
Setecls antennas remotaly. 
grqundSf all ynused antennae. 
GNO position qroxinds all afi- 
(#nnas when leavmg Matron. 
"Rain^Hat" construction shields 
motor and switcties. 
Moto*: 24 VAC, 2 amp. Lubr*c#- 
lion gooid to — ^O^F, 
Switch RF Capabiiiiy: Maximum 
legal limit Price: Si 20.00 



MATCHING NETWORKS 




HN'4 



Price: $120.00 



2D0O vrjBlts P^P 

Price: $240,00 



Owwril- m lni«grAl Wattmflter iP^Qt% farwartt pow^ ir» 
w«fts »n<i VSW" □irectj>. si a- :;-e caiit>rat«d la read ^' 
fkected i>Owrr • Mafelics 59 olim transmltMr output to ciiiav 
antenna fMdtine wil^ VSWR oE at Jeatl 5:f * Qcivers riam 
bartfis BO inru tO meters * SwItcMi in or oat witti ff«n^ 
P4nat iwitcn • Sft9t 5%'H, lOf*"W fl^O {14 n 57.3 n 
20 3 c mi, K^N-SODO U^^U {365 cm) 

• C«fitiniri>ut Pvtr Output: MN-4 ?DQ wali& M^^-2QCX]. 
1000 watti (2O0<3 uuaiLs f^Pi • MN 20IJO only; Up to 3 an> 
terina connectors selected by Irorrt pjirtul swilcti. 




RF 

WATTIVIETERS 



W-4 1.a-54 MHz Price: S 72 00 
WV-4 20-200 MHz Price; S B4.0O 

flUaEi* iCrvM^rd arvd reCt^Clfd pOw«<r dJ^rfCl^y in 
WAlIt jVSWVT) Uon\ mimografD] Jiwo icalcft in 
«^h 4<rtCt.©n SiHt S',"H, SS'^W 4"D jl4 jt 
9.5 K 10,2 ctn) 



Mo#&l Fy|} Sca^e 



Cahbr^tJon Accuracy 



W-4 



?ijO< WD lis IS*^ Of rvBdlnn '^ 2 walls) 
?000 watts *IS% of rirfiding + ^0 watts) 



^^j 1DQ watts a [5% of reading 4 1 watt } 
1 UOQ watts = t &'% ot refid»ng 4- 1 wacts) 




DRAKE 




SSR-1 



COMMUNICATrONS 

RECEIVER 



« Synthesized • General Coverage 

• Low Cost * All Solid State • Built-iti AC 
Power SuppJy • Selectable Sidebands 

• Excellent Performance 

PAELrMENARr SPEClFlCATJOKS: * Covtra^*; 50Q kfil to 
3ti MHz * F^fi&qyencr Can he toad accurately to beltar than 
5 kHz * Sef»iUvit|f tytucAnf 5 microvolt Tar 10 dS S-^N^N 
SSe and belter than 2 microvolts tor lO dB S + M/W AM 
• S«t«ctable ■idebandf • Biillt-fn pdwvr gupfilyT 1t7/234 
VAC ~ 20% • It Ibe AC powar toure« fall* ttie um\ aw^tcties 
aulomalically [o an inTerrml tiatttfry pack *hich use* ttlght 
0-c<!llii (rvol supplieel) • For ftdyced current drAin on DC 
Oporaiion the dial? do n-ot light y[> ynless a -red puahbuttan 
on !he tront panel i% a&pr&^^&d. 

The peir(arm3riGe,. vartailltty, si2.& and low coat of the 
SSH-1 make it id^^al tor u$e as a sland-b^f amalnur Of 
novice-amateur TCQmvmr, ■tiod wave receiver. iCB moTiilor 
recerver, or gflner^i pgroose laboratory receiver 

Price: S350.00 



{GENERAL: « Atl unAleur bandi tg mtu QG meEers in &e«-«n 
eiC :» Hz' f amge^ • SdUhl StftM VFD Willi it IlHj 4jial dibrsjofti 
* iModM SS6 Upper anti Lowtr. CW Bid AM « Butlt-(n 
StdviOA* and automatic T/R tw^lctime on CW • 30 tut>^ 
unit »mi-cfiadlielBtft ■ Oimentiqfn: 5 I'^M, tO?'i'*W, t4H.* 
Cii:4CjL:r3M 36-5 cm\ Wt: 16 ibs. (7.3 kgj. 
TfUNSWiT: * VOX «# FTT o^ 3S@ or AM • tnfiut l>DW«r: 
SSe 300 watts PJE.P.: AM. SW watts PEP controlled 
C4iiin«r cornpatJibFe wilti S53 linears, CW, 26Q watts » 
Adjustable pl-networlu 

RECEIVi: * 5«fliltivitr b^nar Ihan % ^V far 10 dB S/N « 
I.F. Salflctivllr 2.1 kHt @ 6 dB, 2.B ktii @ 60 dB. • AGC 
lu[l on receive modei. v^FstjIo witti FIF gairt coniror, rasl 
;i[iLick nnd slaw releasa With nol3« pulse suppres-slorv • 




Dlodtt Deleclor \at Aivl rscaption. 

price- $699.00 

34-PNB Plug-m Noise Blanker 
FF 1 Crystal Control Unit . . . 
MMK-3 MpbMe Mount »...** 
RV-4C Remote VFO ,,.**.. 



TR-4CW SIDEBAND TRANSCEIVER 



. 100.00 

. . 46.95 
, . . 7.00 
$150.00 



POWER SUPPLIES 
AC-4 Power Suppl/ 
DC'4 Power Siippty 



, $120.00 
. . 135*00 



2 METER FM 

PORTABLE TRANSCEIVER 

Model TR-33C 



LINEAR AMPLIFIER 
Model L^B 





Amateur Net $229.95 
SCPC* Frequency Control 
12 Channels with Selectable Xmtr Offsets. 
All FET Front-end and Crystat Fiiier for 
Superb Receiver Intermod Rejectton. 
Expended Antenna Choice. 
Lowv Receiver Battery Drain. 
Traditional R. L. Drake Service 8dCkMp, 
Single Crystat Per Channel. 



L-4B Linear Amplifier 895.00 

• 2000 Watts PEP^SSB ♦Class B G rounded- 
Grid — tv^o 3 500Z Tubes ♦ Broad Band 
Tuned- Input ♦ RF Negative Feedback ♦ 
Transmitting AGC • Directional Wattmeter 

• Two Tautba nd Suspension Meters • L 4B 
13-15/16" W. 7-7/8" H, 14 5/16" D. Wt.: 
32 lbs, • Power Supply 6-3/4" W, 7-7/8" H, 
11" D, Wt.: 43 lbs. 

POWER SUPPLIES 

AC 4 Power Supply S120.00 

DC 4 Power Supply 1 35.00 



Touch-n-go with 

DRAKE 1525EM 

Push Button Encoding Mike 




Drake 1 525EM, microphone with tone encoder and 

connector for TR-33C, TR-22, TR-22C. ML-2 $49.95 

• Microphone and euto-patch encoder in single convenient package with coil cord and 
connector- Fully wired and ready for use. 

• High accurBcy IC tone wnerator, no frequency adiustments. 

• High reiiabilitv Digitrgn® keytioard. 

• Power for tone encoder obtained from transceiver ttirou^ microptiDne cable. No 
battery required^ Low current drain. 

• Low output impedartce allows use with almost elt transceivers. 

• Four pin microphone plug; directly connects to Drake TR-33C without any modifica- 
tion in transceiver. Compatible with all previous Drake and other 2 meter units with 
minor modifications. 

• Tone level adjustable* 

• Harig-up hook supplied. 





Tufts Radio Electronics •209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic A Wfiue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395^8280 





iv/zy waste watts? 






(SWR-1A$25.95) 




SWK-I otiards against power loss 

]f you're not pumping out all the 
power you're paying for. our little 
SWR-1 combination power meter 
and SWR bridge will tell you so. You 
read forward and reflected power 
simultaneously, up to 1000 watts RF 
and 1:1 to infinity VSWR at 3.5 to 150 
iViHz. 

Got it all tuned up? Keep it that 
way with SWR-1. You can leave it 
right in your antenna circuit. 



® 




tor in, 40 



UULVXh 

7^2TRJtt7MND 
MOBILE 

ANTENNA 

• Autinnyti-aJly 
liryptrf resprance 
And 75 meters. 

• Powef ntted jt SOU WjU^ 

• lndu<lts tjase 3x^4:1 Kin, uulo- 
mariiraU jnd whip Utp r^rc- 
Ikin 742 AntPtinj 

Price: $10935 




* 



JMR /MOBIL-&1R " 

Two^way^radto headset with superior fidelity 
Electret-Capacitor boom microphone and 

palm-held talk switch. 



Mni^nUpg 0>p 



$69.95 






ELECTRONICS 



EXCLUSIVE 

PELUXE 

5 BAND MOBILE 

45 ANTLNNA 

* All hjnd mmimi init^zhiiiE 
mtcnn^ far 10. 15. 10. 40 
jQcJ 75 mflert 

• |>owrr rated at 1000 Walti 
Pt P 

9 Induilr^ fvise scdion wjlh 
iniil>ilifo:iil 9 fid &ix fotif whip 
fop !!iC4^lidn.45 Anlfrnnu 

Pric<?: $119.95 




SWAN METERS HELP YOU 
GET IT ALLTOCETHER 

These wattmeters teii vchj what s going on. 

Wit h one Of these in h ne wattmet ers do we* resoiogs^ For wnatever [ju rpose 

vou II Kfx>vw If vou re gettirtg jt all weve got the watrmetw for yotJ u^e 

together all the time Need high ac- your Swan credit card ApDticarions ^ 

cu racv? High power nan dl I ng^ Pea K at vour dealer or write to us ■ < 









mr 








J 






w-tm 






p 1 






1 


*^- »n 




^I^^Sftj. 




r" 


<- 


)m^ 


- 






H^9 




-1 









1 

1 





x<'^^ 






WM3000 in-uoi watt 
metw Wim Musc^ Seated 
tfi 2000 w3tt« r^ew f lat- 
resaorfte rJirectiona^ touo 
ifif fot fnaKjmum accuracy 



WAi^DOO Psaitrtaaing 
wanrnpiGT. Reacts fim 
power then with tlieflTrk 
Of a swj rch tru* peak 
oov^f Of vDtir ^^ngte- 
stdflD^no Signal Thats 
wJiatcnurtsonSSB 

S79,9S 



WM1500«ign'AcC%»r3CV to- 
Une W^ttrnttcf 10^ futi 
sca»e accuracy on s 50 
500 and: 1500 watt scales 
? to 10 MHj FonA/aro and 
reflecteo power Use it 
for trou&ie-snooting. too 

S'M9S 



ELECTRONICS 





SWAN LINEAR AMPLfFIERS A Miirk II 2000 
watt P.E.P, fun Ifftal input powt-r unit or the 
1200X matchiriE Cyenet 1200 watt P.E.P, input 
priwethouse with buik^in power supply. The choice 
is yi>uis. $849,93 



NEW SwKn MMBX 
impedance Matcher 

It keeps your iratismitter and your antenna on 
speaklrig terms for a song- Price; $23.95 

CYGNET 1200X PORTABLE 

LINEAR AMPLIFIER 

To quadruple the output of ihi* 300B Cygntt de 
novo^ simply add this matching unit for mori* than 
a kikiwatt of power, Complet*; with seH-contaihed 
power supply ifid provision for external ALCt l-his 
Cygnet offtrs exceptional! v hifth efficiency and 
linearity. S349.d5 

Addiiionat Stuart praduets include: fLxed and mobile antenTms, VFO*t telephone p^ich^ 
VOX^ wattmeier^ microphones attd mounting kits. Ai another extra termce^ only Swan 
Eiectronie^ offers factory -backed financing to the amateur radio community. VitH an 
authorized Swan Electronics dealer for comptele detaih 




® 



ELECTRONICS 




05->1 



VMi^^la C>in Itamrsl'- 



POR BROADCAST-QUALITY TRANS- 
MISSION AND RECEPTION FOR BOTH 
MOBILE UNITS AND BASE STATIONS. 

• Boom -mounted elec tret-capacitor micro* 
phone <lelivers Btudto-quaJily, un distorted 
voice re product ton. Variable gain control 
lets you adiu£^i for optimum modulation > 

•Ciuhioned earetip tete yott monitor in 
pmaey - no speiker blare to disturb 
others. Block* out cnvironmenul noi£««, 
too. lyUde of unbrealLAye ABS plastie. 

• Headband self -ad just* for comfortable 
wear over long hours. SpriT^gflesc hinge 
lets you dip headset on and off with 
just one hand. Reversible for ri^ht or lefl 
ear. 

• Headset can Up hung on standard micro- 
phone clip. 

• Compact pialm-held talk switch lets you 
keep hoth hanfls on the wheel for safer 
driving- Made of unbreakabte ABS pta«tic, 

• Built' in PET transtslor amplifier ftdapu 
microphone output to any transceiver 
impedance. 

• Compatible wilh most iwo-way radios in- 
cluding 40-channel CB units. 

• Bull 1 -in Velcro pad for easy mountinl ot 
thf talk switch. 

• Mjidp in USA, 

SPECIFICATIONS 

Earphone impedance 

and type: 8 ohms, dyrtamic 

Microphone type: Electrei eapacltor 

Microphone ffequtocy 

responw: 200-6000 H? 

Amplifier type: FET iransi*tor» 

variable gain 

Amplifier battery 7-Tolt Mailory 
power: TR-175 

Switching :^ Relay or eleclrnnie 

IDKAL FOR EVEity TWO-WAY RADIO 
COMMUNICATIONS NEED . . . 

CB operators ■ Amateur radio operatoni! • 
Police and fire vehicles • Ambulances and 
emergency vehicle - Tasb and iruckere • 
Marme pleasure and work boats • Con- 
iftt ruction and demolition crews • Indus tri- 
al communications • Security patrols • 
Airport tower and ground crews • Re^ 
mole broadcast and TV -camera creWM • 
Foresters and fire -watch units • 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 021 B5 • (617) 395 8280 



A new precision clock which tells time anywhere in the world at a 

glance, has been announced by Yaesu Electronics Corporation. The time in 
any principal city or time zone can be simuhaneously coordinated with 
local time on a 24 hour basis. After the initial setting, as the clock runs, a 
Time Zone Hour Disc advances automatically, showing correct time all 
over the world without further adjustment. The clock is especially 
designed to withstand shock and may be hung on a wall or placed on its 
desk mount. The clock will run an entire year on a single 1 .5 volt flashlight 
battery and the mechanism starts as soon as the battery is inserted. It 
measures six inches in diameter by two and one half inches deep. An 
excellent item for the business office, ham radio operator, short wave 
listener, boat owner^ and others who want an accurate dependable clock. 

Price: $30-00 Amateur net. 




Educator ll'WHEN SYSTEM 3000 



& Power Supply Kits 




m 




BYTES 

Diver let lo ! 



K^EV FEJmjf^S 


Ktr fEAtUAES 


• Oft «Mr[j rkiri 


* DMigrMKf ipKiHcJilIV tot ma e^Mcaw rt 


• 12a ■ d RAM 


• Haf)ijMl«d 5.6 • 1^ vote dc ouUxji '[^ 1 D 


• Dft'Bijanr rifffviiMin rop lecarKf E38" k $ RAM 


smpB, 


* Re9J(tft(1ir MEiiri^liv^ priTvidaa lor frimi pAn^l CCniFDl 


• 80 HiJ rEitil lirriti cIdcK qvailflUlc (npiproximatclv 


> SuilMn umuMt wmdAm lof pro^gram lud Rndi rword 


5 W |3eifl»i'liO-p«Ah|i. 


* SMreh IttJihJrit Uti rireigram kiad imm caiC^lla iVUvKJid 


■ CcjmplotiJ hlj - nil parlB, OHbtnflt and 


• Edafr j^nfv«-10li pinvnkf lull ifitortafie lo poriphofftl inCoriscfl 


construrjlii^n iiiiinciMl 


u^plv jPIAf «ti4 nil adHJre&s, eilBid tnQ conltDi bu» mgnalt for 


9 EAiy. on* QVttriing oonittucbdn. 


KyiMKn ei|i«nkiQn 




• Te»t^A*Y(wByiifl tor »cun4e, ■ejTOf ti«a MTwirwftfir* 




■ Ea»r. w<^ wifti(>MC4»on — one -genirfl 




* Supeon lieajmrmiihiin aimed si Isacntng UPli Wmmjt mtd 








> CirMvWy Mtl-DWttrned Al piiflb fKtwM U lf«i n eorWlete 




{xr^HjEfean i^timd . 




• Stiptn»pemir mgf»fVBicfatBiiSV^ t.Omf^ ' 






CUSTOMER iMFORMATlON 



SHfccron ■ kit pncwa wFOHWAncw: 

$169 Jd 



POW^R SUPTT.V" (SEE PHOfTD AQOVEjt 
AOOinOtsrAl. t29 X e ram iC4fl11>: 



ACCESSORIES TO COUE fH HEAR FUTURE: 

ViDEO Q^SP-_AY 

KEYQOARO 

MdOUtE CAflO RACK AND POWBl SUPPLY 

MBMORV M00OL£S 

APPUCATICINS PROGRAMS OH CASSETTES 



TEN FRONT -PANE L'PROGB AM ABLE PRtOfliTY CHANNELS for storage of fre 

quHncy, transmittei pf^itEJl. and tore encode r/d&codSf modfi /frequency. 

BUILT-IN SCAISfl^ER tor automat re tunirkc] in uKer-MJecied one or four MHi bands. 

Stan ap*fid 2.5sec/MH/, ;jdjusidbEe pause. 

PRIORITY CHANNEL SILENT MONITOR ^ vcnJC*i operate qn one frequeocv while 

monitor fng anotN^, 

TWO FREQUENCY TONE ENCODER/DECDDCR pravides twa selectable, fullv 

adju&tabte, subaudit^ lones lot trtfrsmxt and/or tone -coded squetch, 

ANY THANSMtTTEH OFFSET wiltiout additiqnil crvstilt. 

AUDIOA/ISUAL ALARM lo let y{>u know M^en rtie moriiiofed priority ch»ifler h 

ocQjpied or wtien tone coded fQuelch is acltvaOKt. 

AOVANCED PLL SYNTHESISER coven 1440C0 - 147.39S MHi wtlh luJI 

pu^h button lumng 

SUPERIOR RECElViB wlb v^n^itivity^ seJcetwity »id intermodul^ion chirictvrtttia 

that are miore like mtlit^ry rh#n amijteur 

POWER OUTPUT ADJUSTABLE TO 25 WATTS, 

EXTRAORDINARY WARRANTY. Every SYSTEM 2000 »% wan^ted to ba tree from 

dfifeCTS far two full ve^rt, «nd it is Amef tcan made lo s«r vicing is no protaHem. 

SMALL SIZE. Desi^r>ed for mobile arid fixed operaEion, SYSTEM 3000 i% only 5.3 

inches wide. 2.6 inch« hi^ and 11 inches de^p^ 

VERY COMPETITIVELY PRICED. Introductory price h only S499. 










t14S1'4n - 



Me. 1t«.]104fft -«»J» 
-no J» Ife 1 14329401 - Brn* - O.M 



11«.]^<l4Ka-0.2B 






NYE VIKING SPEED-X KEYS 

NYE VIKING Stand^d Sp««fl-X keys fealtire^ smootli. adfusuble 
bearings, heavy -duty silver contacts, and are mounted on a heavy 
oval die east base with black wrinkle finish. A %'a liable virith 
standard 4 or Ka^' knob* writh* or without switch, and with nickel 
or brass plated key arm and hardware. 

Pamper youfself with a Gold-Plae«d NYE VIKING KEY! 

Model No. 114-31C'^04GP haa ail the smooth action features of 
NVE Sp«ed-X keys ifl a $p«{?ial "presentation'* model. All 
hardware is heavily gold plated and it is mounted on onyx-Uke j^t 
black plastic sub^base. List price is $50.00. 



NYE VIKING SQUEEZE KEY 

Extra-long^ finger-fitting molded paddles ivith 
adjustable spring tension, adji^tabie contact 
spacing. Knlfe*edge bearings and extra large, 
gold plated silver contacts! Nickel plated brass 
hardware and heavy, die cast ba&e with 
non-$idd feet. Base and dust cover blacic 
crsckle Enished. SSK*1 - $23.4 &. 
SSK-1 GF has heavily chrome^plated base and 
dii^t cover. List price* S29,95* 

You i^et a sure, smooth. Speed- X model 
310-001 transmitting key, linear circuit oscillator and amplifier, with a 
built-in 2^^ ^^ker, alJ mounted on a hea^'y duty aluminum base with 
non-skid feet. Operates on standard 9V transistor type battery (not 
included). List price, SIB. 50. 

PHONE PATCH Model No, 250-46-1 incisures 6-1/2** wide, 2-1/4" 
high and 2-7/8" deep. List price, $36.50. Model 250-46-3, designed for 
u^ with transceivers having a built-in speaker, has its ow^ built-in 2^* x 
6'' 2 watt speaker. Measujres 6-1/2" wide, 2-1/4" high and 2-7/8" deep. 
List price, $44.50. 



CODE PRACTICE SET 



Tufts Radio Electronics ©ZOg Mystic Avenue •Medford MA 02155 • 16171 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avtniae* Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 






Gain (over Isotropic 



• Model TA -33 

• 3 Elemerkts 
*J0.1 db Forward 

iiource) 

• 2a db Front>to-Back Ratio 

The Mosley TA-33, 3-e lenient beam provides 
out5t4indmg 10, 15 and 20 ixit^ler perfor- 
ms nee. Exceptionally broadband — gives 
excellent results over full Ham bandwidth. 
Incorporating Mosley Famous Trap-Master 
Lraps, Power Rating — 2KW F.EJ». SSB. The 
TA-33 may also be used on 40 meters with 
TA-40KR conversion. Complete with bard- 



10, 15 1^20 Meters 



Gsm (over isotropic 



MULTI-BAND BEAMS 
TRAP MASTER 33 . . . 

• Model TA-33Jr. 

• 3 Elements 

• 10.1 db Forward 
sourt«) 

• 20 db From 'to-Back Ratio 

The TA-33Jr . . . mcorporates Mosley Trap- 
Mtistcf Junior traps. This is the low power 
brother of the TA-33. Power Rating — 1 KW 
P.E.P. SSB, $151.65 




TA-33 JR. POWER CONVERSION KIT 
MODEL MPK-3 

Owners of the Mosley Trap-Master TA-33Ji, 
may obtain higher power without buying an 
entirely new antenna. The addition of the 
MPK-3 (power conversion kit) converts the 
TA-33*Ir. into essentially a new antenna with 
750 watts AM/CW and 2000 watts P.EJP. 
SSB. $52.25 




TRAP MASTER 36 . . . 10, 15 & 20 Meters 

• Model TA^6 

• 6 Ekments 

• Forward Gain <over Itotiopie source^ - 10.1 
db on 15 & 20 meters, llj db on 10 
meters. 

Front4.0'-Baek Ratio on all bands. 20 db. 
This wide*spa<:ed, six element configuration 
employs 4 operating elements on 10 meters, 3 
operating eiementB on 15 meters, and 3 
operating elements on 20 meters* Automatic 
bandswitcbing is accomplished through 
Mosley exclusively designed high impedance 
parallel resonant "Trap Circuit.*' The TA-36 is 
dc*iigned lor 1000 watts AM/CW or 2000 
Wiitts P.E.P. SSB. Traps are weather and dirt 
prool, offering frequency stability under all 
weather conditions. $33 5. 25 




MOSLEY AK-60 MAST PLATE ADAPTER 
Mast Plate Adapter for adapting your Mosley 
IW* mounted beam to fit 2" OD mast. 
Complete w^ith angJe and hardware. $11-15 




A brilliant new 2 meter transceh^r 
with i^cTv in-ikiTiafid operating 
fratua^ 3nd L^)fi\^enk?nce 
KLM MULTI - 2700 - S 795.95 

^Synthesizer afv3 VFO. 

* All modes: NBFM, WBFM, AM, 

SSB w/USB/LSB and CW. 

• Frequency synthesizer (PLL) 

3 Knob. 600 channels, 1 O kHz steps. 

• VXO, plus or minus 7 kHz. 
^ LED readout on synthesizer. 

• standard 600 kHz splits plus . . , 
•Two "oddball" splits. 

^ OSCAR transc^iua 2 to 10 metier operation, 

• OSCAR receiver buiit-in. 

• Connectors on rear for separate 2 



lYHiter and 10 meter antennas. 

• Built-in VFO (eontinuous coverage, 
144-14S MHz in 1 ,3 MHz segments. 1 
kHz readouth 

• 8 poie SSB filler plus two FM 
fitters, 

• 100 kHz crystal calibrator^ 

• voice operated relay (VOX} or 
p-t-i. 

* Audio speech compression. 

• Noise blanker. 

• RIT, plus or minus 5 kHz. 

• Power out/'^S" nrieter. 

• FM center deviation meter* 

• lOW minimum output power^ NO 
TUNINGI 

• Hi-Lo power provision. 

• Built-in AC/DC power supply. 

• Double conversion receiver, 16,9 
MH^ and 455 kHz l-Fs- 

• Receiver sensitivitV* 

FM; 0.5^V for 28 dB S/N. 
SSB/CW: 0.25JL(V for 14 dB S/N. 
AM: 2^Vfor lOdB S/N. 

• Size: Inches: BH, 14.88W, 12D. 
MM: 128H, 37SW. 305D. 

• weight: 28 lbs. (13 KG J. 




CLASSIC-33 ... 10, 15 & 20 Meiers 
Model CL-3a 

• 3 Elements 

• lO.l db Forward Gain (oveT isotropic 
source) on nil hands. 

• 20 db Front-to-Badt Ratio on 15 & 20 
meters, 15 db on 10 meters, 

BRIDGING THE GAP . , . The Clasac 33, 
combines the best of two Mosley systems. 
Incorporating Mosley Classic Feed System for 
a "Balanced Oipacttive Matching^^ system 
with a feed point inipedance of 52 ohms a.t 
resonance, and the Famous Mosley Trap* 
Master Traps for "weather -pi oof" tiap^ with 
resonant friiquency stability. This extra 
sturdy muiti*band beam. Model Clf-33, for 
operation on 10, 15 & 20 meters features 
improved boom to element damping, stainless 
steel h^rdwart!, balanced radiation and a 
longer boom for even wider element spacing. 
Power Rating — 2 KW P,EP. SSB, Eecom* 
mended mast siat — 2" OD. Wind Load — 120 
lbs. at 80 MPH. Approx. pupping weight — 45 
lbs. $232.50 




C1.ASS1C203 _ , 20 Meters 
Model CL'203 
3 Elements 

• lQ,l db Forward Gain <over fsotropie 
source) 

• 20 db Front-to^Back Ratio 
Incorporating the Mosley patented Classic 
Feed System, this full size 20 meter single* 
band beam has IW to 3/8" dia, "swaged" 
elements wide spaced on a 2" dia, 24' boom* 
Maximum element length-37' SW. The high 
standards in qwility construction established 
by Moslijy in over a quarter -century of manu- 
facturing is reflected in this mono-band . . . 
Model CL*203. Boom-to-mast clamping 
assures stability with a time-tested arrange^ 
ment of mast plate, cast aluminam clamping 
blocks and stainless steel Unbolts. The exclu- 
sive ''Balanced Citpacitive Matching" System 
has a nominal feed point impedance of 52 
Ohms at 2 KW P.E^, SSB, Recommended 
mast si2e*2** O.D, Appro x. shipping wt; 42 
lbs. via truck, $227.65 




CLASSlC-36 , , - 10. 15 & 20 Meter* 
Model CL-36 

• 6 Elements 

• 10*1 db Forward Gain (over Isotropic 
source) on 15 & 20 meters^ 11 »1 db on 10 
meters. 

• 20 db Front -to-Back Ratio on all bttnds. 
The Classic 36^ like the smaller Classic 33, 
incorporates both the Mosley World-Famous 
Trap-Master Traps and the Mosley Classic 
Feed -System. Designed to operate on 10, IB 
t 20 meters, this multi^band beam Model 
CL-SB, employs the high standards of quality 
construction found in all Mosley products. 
The boom-to-mast clamping assures stabiUty 
with a time-tested arrangement of mast plate, 
cast aluminum clamping blocks and i^tainless 
steel U-bolts. The exclusive "Balanced Capaci- 
tive Matching^' system has a feed point 
impedance of 52 ohms, at resonance^ Wind 
Load — 210.1 lbs. at 80 MPH. Power Rating 

— 2 KW P.E.F. SSB, Recommended mast aze 

— 2" OD. Appro X. shipping weight — 7t lbs. 
via truck. $310.65 




40 METER CONVERSION IQT MODEL TA- 

40KR 

Work 40 meters In addition to 10* 1 5 & 20 
meters by usinga TA^OKR conversion kit on 
Ihe radiator element of the TA^33 and TA-36v 
(Beams with broad band capacltlye matching 
may not be converted!) Convert the TA-33Jr. 
with the MPK-3 (power conversion kit) before 
adding the TA-40KR kit. S92.25 



SIGNAL-MASTER ANTENNA 
Beam Antenna . . . Model S-402 lor 40 meters 
For a top signal needed to piL^h through forty 
meter QRM. the Mosley Signal Muster S-402 
wiU do the trick! This 100% rust-proof 
2 -element beauty constructed of rugged 
heav¥*wall aluminum is designed and engi- 
neered to provide the performance you need 
for both DX hunting and relaxing in a QRM 
free rag-chewing session. Beam is led through 
link coupiing, resulting in an excellent match 
over the entire bandwidth. $267^50 



Tufts Radio Electranics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics •209 Mystic Avenue •Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



6 METER BEAMS 




1-5-6-10 ELIMiNTS 

rovtm pertomiance from ruRgtti, [ull slx«, S metor beams. 

\e-mtinl HjjACErtgfianJ lengths havo huen crArefully engineered to 
ve best pattt-rn, hifiJi forward g&ln., gtrnd frunt lo back ratio 
id broad frerjuency rt&ponse, 

ooma are -058 wo.!! and elements are S/4'* — S/S" .04iS wail 
?amlesg ^'hromc Finish aluminiun tubing. The H ^lud 5 i^ileinciit 
.■Lima havfl 1 y/a" -1 L/^'- booms* Thefisind lOulmnErnt beams 
ivy I 5/S" - L 1/2'' boomis. All brackets are heavy gauge 
i^ni:M"&iuiriililJiin, tStight rirsisiht^ad pla.tedilbi>k^ Arc adjuhbiblc 
r up to t 5/^"' msi&t -on '3 anrf 5 (^tement and 2" on a and EO 
enient beams. A[l models maj be mounted for horizontal or 

Hw features ineludt adjustable length elements k Rilou'^tt. Heddl 

iateh and bMllt-Sn cms fiUlTT.& fordirsiet ^2 ohm (eed. Thfi^&e 

i3ms iire liiL'LQr>' Jimrked and supplied with instructions for 
jlck assembly. 



DiOicriptiDn 
Mrtfkfl No 
BocjiTV Lmjth 
Longest El. 
Tiirn f^»diLE3 
FMvd, Gain 



3 efErriEnt 

117" 
^■ 

7.5 dB 
?OdB 
7 \\>i. 



Selt-rncnt 


6elerrieni 


lOelenneflt i 


A50-5: 


A505 


A50t0 


12' 


20' 


24' 


117- 


117 


117" 


7' 6" 


IV 


13' 


9.5 HB 


1t.5dB 


13 dB 


24tiB 


26 dB 


2SdB 


11 lbs. 


ta Ihs. 


25 lbs. 




RINGO 
RANGER 

for FIH 




.5 dB" - 6 dB** 
Dmnidirectional 

GAIN 

3ASE STATION 

ANTENNAS 

FOR 

MAXIMUM 

PERFORMANCE 

AND 

VALUE 



Cush Craft has created another first by making the? 
world's most popular 2 meter anteiiTia twice as good. 
The tiew Ringo Rangi&r is cleveJopcd from the tiasic 
AR-2 with three ha^f waves fti ph^ise and a one eighth 
wave TTi ate hirig^ stub- FLtngo liang:er gives an extremely 
low a,Ti^le of radiation for Iwtter signal eovera^e- It is 
tunahEe over a broad frequency range and perfectly 
matched to 52 ohm pnax, 

ARX-a. 137-160 MHz, A lbs,, 

AHX^220. ZZO-525 MHz, 3 lbs., 

ARX<45a, 435-4&0 MMz, 3 |b$ , 



112" 
75" 
39" 



* Reference ^ wav* dlpole. 

'* Reference H wave whip used as grain stand&rd by maay 
raanuifacturej'g . 
Work full quiettng into more repeaters and extend the 
radius of your direct t'on tacts with the new Ringo 
Ranjter; 

You can up date your present AR-2 Hingo with the 
simple uriditioJi of thin extende-. kit. The kit includen 
the phiismg' network and necessary element extensiotis. 
The only tnodiftcatioiis required are easy to make aiiw 
slits in the top section of your iintenna. 



ARX-2K 



CONVERSION KIT 



2 METER 

ANTENNAS 




A-FM Hl*(GO ^■'^^ ^ GaJa ireferencfi *i wavw wtvipt- HnJf wivt EetigtJi *Bt 
tfilinaa with dirwit tk ground. 52 nhprt f**tl LakSi PL-aSD, IcJ^W iJiJJl* it( mdii- 

LLoii with ]"1 S'WB^ Fiittiii^- ^iieA;!2semfrSad iii-d ready to UibEjiJI. S ine't«r 
pjidJy pn;aAs*iHitit«l. all bul 450 MHz lake LH" shsLiil,. Th*™ art mora HErvgoa 



Model NumlMT 


AK-Z 


AR-25 


AR.fil 


JMl-220 


AB-4M> 


Fi-i!<jLi,«nt.'y WTtri 


J35-176 


13*- ITS 


*0-S4 


220--235 


4^P-1BQ 


Power — Kdlg, Watla 


too 


SDO 


IW 


IM 


2m 


Wind ftrtik 4iq. ft. 


.31' 


,21' 


JT^ 


,30^ 


M- 



B-fl POLE L'p if 9 dB Oflin ci-mw a fe wjjv* -dijirjj^, Qvendl jHTit-pfliiJi length 
147 MKs 2d' 220 MH2 - 1S\ 4:55 MHe - *'. pattern 390' a dfi gfiSn, 
lao-' & dB galm., 5'2 ohm /iMd tELkei FL 3C9 rnnnw'tnr. PncJc-ijfE cnrludEs 4 
<?DnipJetc dJpole EifsernbUeii c>n n>(7untlnj^ bt^m?, ham€3!; and iti\ hardware. 

AFM"IT> m ' 150 MHz, toaCh Witts, wind ifea. 2.Si aq. m 
AKM-lf4D a:!ft-lS25 AlH?, lOtiU wfttt,g, ifciini irea t.Si sq fL, 
AFM'^iD 435 --^M WHii, tOOO wattta, wlEul aisa I.13 aq. *t: 

D'f'OWER PACF^ "Hir big si^ai CSS clement airayi /or U mete]' FM. u:-;*h 
LWh> A14T~|I1 ^^gi£i WLtti a llCH££!tlta] n^iDUhtLEL^- bfHim, tCuf.^-M' lvt^^«s^; iLiiri 

A]] hardi^'are Pfsrward ^nJn Ifl dB, F.B tuiJ^f 2-1 dB. 'i powpr beRmivSdth 

4:1-'. (f i mirn^iunif 14-1" >^ HO'' k -CO", Lurti tilditi:!! BO", Weight .15 ll^^.; 52 Qtlnl fi£«Ll 

tiLiKe^ r£j-259 attSn^. 

A147.22 HA . 143, MHz, IDDD Vf^LtB. wlRd ana. £.42 aq. ft 

D-tAGl &tACM»*G KjT5 VTK ineludes tioHEontal mounting tKwm., harrnw5, 

avar tm P^ngle aj^tenna. 

A14-VP«, ■KHTiplete 4 fflemcni .'stiiphiJh^ kit 

AI4-SK, -1 Btdm^nt efintse hai-neea onJy 

mU'VT-'K £u.rnpiete II e-lememl sta^^klng Kit 

AI47-SK. It etamwit i:yitJt nasmea? oiUy 

A449-SK, B - 11 eSemunt cpas hmrtiMSi i>nXy 

E-4-6-11 t-LEMfHT TAP IS The KhLni3;n.rd r>f cniiigMEri scm ih VHF-UHF CCHIl- 
munJcattoRfl, now tut for FM and v*ri.ieaJ poSatisatLon. THe foLU- arid a\x ete- 
mi(!nt fn*>J«lK con tic ttiwtr .fjtlt hiiivnicd. AW P-rr ifmteij nt )0M i*-itut with 
direct 5£ ohm r«od aikd Pl>-299' connaelors. 



Mode] Humber 

Wght./Tum radium 
GtdA..''F/B rktii* dB 
■Vi Power b&ain 
Wifld nreft Sq. ft. 
Fniqucncy MHz 



AH7-11 

13.2/23 

4&" 

1.^1 

ne-i-ie 



A-I47-t 

i Jbs.t 44" 
&/2fl 

.4* 



A444-11 

eg-.'i;t'- 
4 ttM., 90" 
13.2/-^^ 
4S" 

.:3S 

440^450 



A44fr-9 

a Its., i«" 

440^^» 



ASlffO-lI 
102 "/^fl" 
5 1^., il" 

l3.&.'-2fi 

.50 
2350.225 



FrFM TWISt l2.-i dB Gain. T«jn ■PlcmPnt* tiiririituitat jiGlartEalton for tuw 
twvd mv*ray.j? ^cuj t*Ti *]*;iiierits ^i^ej-ttcaJ poliii'lEatJoia fof FM ojvernK^. For- 
is-anl: g^dj]] 12.4 dB. f/B ratio f£ dB; boajn l«ii|f(h 19i;>". weight 10 ibs.. itmfiwfl 
«t«mi!nt '10", 52 dhm iH.^4}dii Kl^l.L':ti dj-iTfen eJementa tak^ PI.-^EI corniectasr:;, 
ik^a two BepBJBte Feed lines. 

A147-S0T 14ii - 147 MHe, 1000 «^-^atb«, Wind' anH 1.42 aq. ft. 



#fl6N PERFORMANCE 
VHF YAGiS 




3/4 , 1-1/4, 2 METER BEAMS 

'["he .^dtandard ^f C4>niparlBon in amateur \fHF/l.lHF -cotTimuiJica- 

liorts Cunh Craft yag is connblne nil oul perlcrmtinte aud re-lh- 
hElity with nptinium size Tor ease of iassembly anrt mfluntinjc eiL 
your aJle* 

Lighlwtftghfc yt'l ruKgtid, the atitcnna^ have S/lC 0+ 0- solid 
aluminum ^.ilemcnt&wilh &/l^" L-enter sections moutiledofi heavy 
duty formed brack fHa. Boon^s ar* I" und 7/8" OtD„ aiunilmtm 
tubing. Mafet mciiints of l/fl" formnri aluminum have udiutiUbJe 
u-boUs for up I" l-lM** Oi D. maaLs. 'they can )>? nnjurtt^ri 
for ttori£ontal or verticnl polarir-Utlan. Complete Instruetlons 
irtclude data qm 2 met«r FM repeater npt^ratjnn^ 

New features jTidude a kilov,'QE.t Redeli Mstch for cHrect H'l ohm 
coaxial feed with a standard PL-^ri.0 fitting. All elements are 
gpaccd at .2 wavelength and tap«r-'ed for inraproved bandwidth. 



Made! No: 


A 144 7 


AI^'I'll 


Ai!20 n 


A430 11 


Dosoipttart 


2m 


2m 


IVim 


.^iti 


Elements 


7 


Tl 


11 


11 


Bpam Jjigth. 


9B" 


144 - 


102' 


57" 


Weiglil 


4 


6 


,4 


3 


fvrti. Gain 


11 dB 


13 dB 


":13ljB 


13 dB 


F.'E Raticj 


26 dB 


25 dB 


m m 


2gdB 


FwrfJ Lot*# 










'■■S pwr. pt. 


46 


47 


42 


42 


SWR^frcq. 


Tiol 


1 to 1 


1 lot 


1 Lol 




VHF/UHF BEAMS 



A50-3 $ 


32 B5 


A144-7 


21.95 


A50-B 


49,95 


A 144-11 


32.95 


A50-6 


69.95 


A430-1 1 


24.95 


A60-10 


99.95 






AMATEUR FM ANTENNAS 




A147'4 $ 


19.95 


AFIV144D 


54.95 


At47-t1 


29.95 


AR-2 


21.95 


A147-20T 


54J95 


AR-6 


32.95 


A147-22 


84.95 


AR-25 


29,95 


A220'7 


21.95 


AR^220 


21.95 


A220-t1 


27^5 


AR-450 


21.95 


A449-6 


21.96 


ARX-2 


32.95 


A449'1 1 


27-95 


ARX-2K 


13.95 


AFM^D 


59 B5 


ARX-220 


32.95 


AFM-24D 


57^5 


ARX-450 


32.95 


144IVrMz. 
Duacrtption: Model: Pnca: 


220 MH^, 

Model: Prka: h 


43ZMHE, 



70 EPciment 

DX- Array 
Ffarp^rft Hnmess 

140 E.^ 
Frame- &. Harna55- 

(80 El. I 
1 -1 &?-flhfrL bflluft 
Vsrir. PSfc. Bracket 

r20Et.> 



DX-120 42,95 

DXK'140 5S.9S 

DXK -180 109.95 
Q^f-IBN 12.9B 



DX'22di ^,95 
D^l£-24Q ^.^ 

DX-2Bt^ 12.95 



DX-430 32!,95 
DXK-440 ».96 
PJCKJtaCi TtjfiS 



DX-VPB 



9,s& OK.vi^e s-is ox-vpa 9.9s 





Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue # Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 




Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 




For all you hams with little cars .. 

We Ve got the perfect mobUe rig for you. 





The Atles 210a Qr 2t53( mnejiiirna nhty 
9^i' wide K 9'^' deep is mily %%' hJiih. y^t 
Lhe above photugraph ahuwti how aiiiiiil> ihe 
Atlas tranaceiver tits in la El cttntpftct ciir^ 
And there's pEent^' a( maia lo ipiirv For 
VMF gear and other acceKOTV Kluhpfiisnt 
With the eKcJusive Atlst pJug-kn dmign. 
you can a!ip your AtLu \n and i^l of ytmr 
ear in a mattej- of seconds. All uortniScljiQna 
urn DudeuiKoiiHliciiUv, 

NT mmn let thi smau. size fool 

TOW 

Eiren llunti^ ilk? AUat Zlflbi add ILSsi limM- 
<!fliv«f» 04^ hg^ than IhU tb» iIm sfld 
walglhi of ctihef HF mMMtaiin, Tbt Alki 
h truly a pa]it mj 



dotlstatltiy reflecl gteai Burt^riBU' nl rhn Hig- 
aal iSlretLgtJi in rDlution to lhe puwof raliujj;, 

FULL 5 BAND COVOtAGE 
The 210* taivers 10-6O imttan, whlb itiri 
t\^n ctivvts IS-teo EDorim. Adriing the 
AlW Model lOTtCnvtMlOtctitHrurr'r^wldB 
gT«!4lly increaEiitnl frequaicy i:uvi!irtijf(^? tor 
MAKS and network apgraUock 

NO TRANSMTTTEH Tt^TNG Oft 

KOADING co.vrmoLs 

wifh Atlas' totaJ fanxulliHLadinit. Wilh four 
AdtSfOagetifiBtBiitQSYHfidlkUidi ' 




EXCEFnONAL TMMI'Nmr TO 
SIGVAL OViXLOAD A-^D 
LT.\TIQ\. Th© mn/dkaryw. ffOll 
fD ih? r«p«|M«r aOairt i«u to ^ipiffriil* datar 
In freq u enc y to itrcHV nnjilimiiinf tlpialt 
than fm ban e*ar expwiHicfcl b#f cnt H 
you bdne not ve4 operatfld on Atlai trnio- 
caiVBT IB a cmwdBd band atid oMUMtad it 
wl!^ any fpHier tacaivBr <)t tfa iiae ali Wf > rw 
havaa reel ihrill coining 



H —J- 4 ^ ^ 


\S 


m^ 




t^vi 


"Tf*\\~ 


~l-*y \ 





A WORIJ) WIDE UEALEH NETWO^ TO 
SEHVE YOU. 

Whother ymj'redrlviiiiij a Hondo In Kima4ia 
City or a MorcsdaB llifn?. In Wohi LivrmitJiy, 
ibere't an AUas dealer near v^U- 



AtiuSlQi or 3!ia« ........ 


. IHTQ.OO 


W/Ni7id« BIUikiT . 


, TIB 00 


ACCESSOBIES- 




ACCdnsolr liD,'?2Q V 


i14t,CK} 


PcnUMe AC uippttt t tDf2:tO V 


100.00 


Ptti|-to WAlMlr Kit 


4i.CW 


llhi Osc_ Icsi CTT*(ili 


aaoQ 


IkeitftI ThmX p£»-6ti 


339 04 



ZOO WATTS POI^IX KAfliGT 
This pcmrET tevd. id a lavHi pound inA^ 
anfff ia JncmdiUa: but mia. Alki 1r«na> 
rBTsri gTEB fmali ifaa Uli pDwrt^r vm aaod 
to VMnl din warid harafoat. Sijcnitli n^xxia 



fclOST ADVANCED STATE OF THE AIT 
SOLID STATE OSBBltf 

ncri auj:^ scctM^ilEi for itt light miiliL bat 
B^vi^es |Wj y«ar» of tup pprfomanm and 

PUJCMN dBCtTT BOARDS 

and laodBtaj deaipi prtnridBt tor aaa* of 

*»r> l cU ii L 



FKE*iOMENAL SELICnvnT 

The excliisivt! 9 pub eryataL Uicldar fUtflr 
used Id Ad^ut tnuitcviv«<r« rapfQ9«niJi i^ 
ma|n; biaaJilhnNigh in fillifr desjin, with 
wnpmrwteirtad ■Ufl aalactniti jvod at- 
timjiics rpjecHotL AalteahgWjFraph'tbgiia. 
ihis filioT pitividei a G dti banoKidSb of 
ZjOD HerbL ID db domt ntnJnr 4300 Hatt, 
and jji b^Ddwidlh of obIt UOD Harti 4i IID 
ffi} down! UltiBiaia rvfadtkiQ t» in euseaa ol 
130 db; creatar iban Iba flwaauiiivr linsits 
ot natal laal aqiiipqitnL 



For cDflipMa deiaik aaa yuur Allu daalar, 
or ditq} as a aaid and we II mail tou a 



.^^ ATLAS 

"^^^^ RADIO INC, 





AMATEUR 
ANTENNAS 



M 



the home of originals 



1 1 



SUPER QAIN 
Twe Meier b 



MOBILES 




I 



mr tu 



STANDARD GAIN 

MOBILES 

Two Met*™ 

■ S/B wavtaeng^ — IJl d* Klin 
iwer I, '4 Wire rrMtllli 

■ FrequBficv i;i:n*f a||B— Ml to 149 
MHz 

• pTj»«r ratiri>g^2SJ *Blti FM 

HOO^I- BBLT-1M 

#r afl-tEFina cainn«ll«ft *iW» Mlilf 
Ut iftstilli. no hoVi ts (tftti, fru(4 
iia fneuiit. innoct iprulf 4nit K 

Adtnns ttliri04A(* Imm iKtM 



ML'IU 



•31 J 



HUSTLEft 
"BUCK^ U STER" 




WF-9 



{ 




HiTil^firl^ 
MHz 

PlMnr falltv— JOd Wlttl fM 

TWO AND Sm MtTEBt— 
tRUNK UP MOUNT 

MODEL HFT 

Fijn* MctKm t*(»«oiilc *f[f*nrr« 
p«fntiti »EMriCi itjiuirnwnl lot 
^n\mHintiMj\ mKtfWKt Of* Cw;> 
■mj irii rrmwn OpartHan^l 
iwtthi *lf tanptrntt ttllh ttunk 
Ufilmmt. tJ Mit, SPBC PiCWi-U 
wj tKtBTir rttKfi« »n. /» 

Fric* I22.SS 

¥HF.'UKF AWTlNIMj^ 

MXiOF aOUMT 

MCDDtL UHT-t 

ben UD la IB MUfc <Mifai cikMl 



IMf-l 



CUT 

141 



CO 



oeLUXE 



MOeiLE MCXINTS 




1' 



MODEL DCT-144 

rior r^c^iviJiB cnpiblll^ willr tfili 
H!i" DolinEBr antenns. C«»V iriiUl- 
lafiDn on iid* tjr «<l|ff (it Erynii lip 
rtithDui d^iHifiK -cnmfvliitt *lth 
V?' WILSPEC FfG-58-U and PL-M*. 

fVtctLl41^ 



UDQEi CG'144 

Same chiiracfcr^liKi » C&T^l^lil 
supfHied «itn ^"-24 bflw la 'It bII* 
i»nabtl« bah -fMiun't'i >- L«n|in \k 
IS' Urmtll' ahi^ CAS It! fHtl m 



¥WF/UHF JUNnXHH*^ 
TlUFiK Uf MOUNT 
HaOEL TW 
F44 



AU resonators are precision wound with 
optiinized d^sigji for e^ch band. Asseiri'^ 
bly includes 17^7 PH stainless steel 
adjustable tip rod for lowest SWE and 
band edge markei'. Choiuse for medium 
or high power operation. j 



STANDARD HUSTLER nESOWATORS 
Power Ratinn: 400 WatU SSB 



JIM 



Model 


Band 


Prico 


RM'10 


10 meters 


$ 6.60 


RM-15 


15 meters 


6SB 


Rhfl'20 


20 meters 


7.30 


RM^O 


40 meters 


13.20 


RM-75 


75 meters 


1B.E0 


RM-SO 


80 meters 


^sm 



^ 



SUPER HUSTLER RESONATORS 
Pa war Rating; Le(pl Limil SSB 
Supers ha^vB wkJeiT bandwidlK 



**rr 




iEsoa»TD« sraiafr- 

STfttKLEH fTTEL 

EL au^ 




ftifli tn«a Iw 
sal PL^l. 



SSHnl 







Mock^l 
RM 10S 
RM'ISS 
RM2DS 
RM^SOS 
HM-75S 
flM.60S 



6 and 

10 meters 
1 5 mfltsrs 
20 metfffn 
40 meters 
75 fTietftrs 
80 rrHBtsri 



price 

sn,30 

12,66 
13.00 
1B.50 
30 OO 
30.40 



For 6-10-15-20-40-T5-80 Meter* 



r««4 




MASTS 




\i\iflV >iEt rnounE Ich tm) 
ntilM inntvlitJcin on wl? 
or *l|l 9) iFCik lid. In- 
clu*i* 17" Ri:^Ba4.l ran.- 
mcion jiticrwd 



MHhl 



HIH 

tNtlcikt trunH tip rmunt 
wllti ISD O^ttrr* iwiv«l 
ball icK iKiiiTlcMii hi iH' 
teitfH tp 4B[1lcsl Eijfty 
no IwlH - intliMitlDi^ 
Includei 17 nG^^B-U 
^abJe jnd mnnictdfl 
MlactiHL Prlea $17 JO 



aoi^i 



VDOn MNM 

All itiijstiK. «r^lei cnn 
UtBit Irlfn line gutte-rs 
lni;Eu0«-i IBQ" sa iwcl 
tMll Prh:p:«i.CM] 



TIM^ 




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fipf««f tell Via SO^ 
^dmpclon 



IHMIIiTtli-i 

Tryfl^ |n»sa aiOMiii m- 
ibilfc m MHwn a«i of 
■nof* imat* tjuii' lict 

ftmM fa oa 




rot OtCK, FlttOFR H «iff 
PlAT ^LrilFU£ 
HODCL SSfel-i 




MOKL C-S 

Sill Tna ufft c &mpi#t* 
(pith- BWUriTn^ 



SHIJCK DISCONNECT— 
1|l«% STILINLESS STEEL 

■pif prcsa Anrt ii#i'[i '^li*!^ tsm 
■litlfrair Mj-thi iniP iM jifrtfl. ID<}% 
LliiFilv!.!. il>«l !.'■' jt irirtail-k— IliiHial* 
Una BPiiT. nn|l9 l;h/4 iilKfi 

'Uiitli'ini loi mrn'iniptri nnii« j>>rk tip 
Kfl inii MIL SPEC IQ iirtHh rt ^[]-)m 
Libia SupflliiLf 4ki1h Lynr4ulm wA 
%^i\i*A ro-' ui# «iillt bill tr hjrn|H> 

UaOtl S«.J44A— Lhfluif. lfP» 

ridiMMM cC tte »Wfy»nf ShuAt t*d 
wrrtti (Ix HiiH><i4*>9 HxdLilnr '^ 

H '#■** uppf f«<ti«ii Hfifpit ] 1 r^ 

sum JC rtdwunCE }. J I fif btffvf 
'«liMC HMDWtfKfH Wi"!! 
lOi^ UPi# iiirfaa an «*^ 
i« la l%~ OD lO^: ' 




mwid! 



HODfl HO-I 

Fjp 

it mat 









CDrerv lO 1$ ZO to Mrl«n 

Wh«l4 a^nd tfertflfl 



\ 



HMU 4-«Tv 



H4 1 



tt^i 



lomvt 3wfl— PLUS. 

^fl^wldith «l Its «mitf«itl 5W1^ 
E.4S Ta I ot btrttKT a^t bund edgei 
Huirtitr Aitcmt^vC' Eup cti^rt 
"^pfilf" «¥(rud^ Ep pth(?i^iw ui^ 
ini4n*b44 Cld« Ir^lpfincrs J«lul" 
ing Kturilv and p«rindnefi[ tr«p 
■nonflnc*. 

Sijibi) enc inch flfa«ilas& trie fto^n^ 
fair (wtimurn etectricai mpH nV' 
Chpflkjl itibility^ 
Cztr« hai^V ')"*> JlwMrnUiiti rtKiiiOl 
M^ Siv:k*t i*tlh hi» lo«t— hif^ 
ttwiflPi pn^ulMWl Hfti^i^ '%«»tf 

Wtfft PlEkjdHl 

411 iKtHins Itt' htrrt mtl h^fp 
WHKL^aiV 



•ti^iiflti ^iMininum 

Stiinliil, il**l t^imC)* pBrfflittm^ 

kdjuilpmnl wilttoul 4irnigv it; fh^ 

ilumiFium tubin|> 

GiitrAntiMl tC' In tintji Aiivrnbiif 

of l<*!f tlultl »n4 rtftie*! 
Anlanni hii H"-?^ itud jI Imp Id 
*CCtpl HM-T) Q^ RM-n-^ Huiller 

Htwn ^ttifvd 

■# bi*iii»iJrri *fld ftiin** i*d^'t*^ 

iifli«k»ficT' 

FBPd Willi' ii^ hmpP ^ 4Mni Owa: 

iHmi f GiiMbiitTih— hi^t <«ci>' '■>■•<( 
S« SW a' CM 






Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue # Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medfortl MA 021S5 • (617) 395-8280 



Super Amp 



front 




Match everything from IbO ta 10 
with the new ItO-lO MAT 




NEW: The Monhar Tuner w^ desigrwd hm- 
cause of ov^fwhelmiriifi cJemond. Kiimi mtcH 
Ul they wanl«j i 3 hilowatt tlitlttr lAnfh a^ 
tuih in wmimrivr. t Iront panel antflnm 
HtoctDT inr cou, btimuxd line andT random 
KVirc. So wt «n9in<Mf ad Hit l^'Q-IOtn Monitor 
Tunar. Its a lifatimi' ittviBiinwit st (299.50 



$299'SO 



If thtt mnphtier you're ih in king at buying doasn't daNvar at kaiX 100Q to IZOO wain output, 
to ttia antenna, YDif''r« buying tha wroni) amplifier. 

Our Naw S^uper Airtii 4 KMt^rng the coumry twcau» harm have pbbIjih^ that ttw DenTron 
i,;. Afiniilitw will deliver to tha Bittfrnp, loutiHri poiMart, wtm otffcr rn^ufaciunafi rate at input 
po«m. 

Th« SufMr 4mp rufs a fult 2000 wnTO P.EJ*. input on S5&, aid! 1000 vntti DC on CW, RTTV 
or SSTV 160 10 meten. the mamummi legal pouMt. 

Tbt Sugar Amp b ax mpm a ^ knv proFi}*, has a aoM ona^pica calxnat asn^iHng rmjumuni TVi 





Meet the 
SuperTuner 



The DsnTrofi Super Tunor lunas awvvthing from liSO-lQ niiivt>, Whrdiar vou hava 
balancad lina, cot» «Aik. random of long *rtn^ ihc Supw Tunar mfl man^ tha anianna 
tmpadanoB to your trafHrnimr. Afl DanTron mnen pv* you majdmum ponwar trviifat 
ft^nn vOur tnnvniftlar to your mtannl^ *id im't that tnhan it raaMy CDUcrt^ 



Tha h a a rt Af our ^rnplifiir. tfii [w wr uippty, a a DonUmjout dhJty, selfoDntainarl tutsply luitt 
tor ODntait parform^nce. 

VW« mount ad t^e4-S72iS't, ^nduitrwl Morklicirsa tui[j«t, rn a Qooling Ehamtwr laaturin^ dia 
On damand vartjble Doc3ir>g lyilam. 

The hnnti at DHnTron prlctathiiinM^lvei on quatity work, i^ti w« hghi ta keep prit«t down. That'i 
'Atiy the dynamic DenTron Unuat Amplifier beats them nLl 

$574.50 

The SO'tO Skymatcher 



1 KW 



MODEL $I29*S0 ^KW MODEL ^229«50 



Hara i an 



lunar for 80 Ifirouglh 10 
m m fanddrn fnre sitanna 



, handlKt BOO w P.E.?. and matchas rour 




* Continuoui tuning 3.2 - 30 mc 

* "L'natyiior* 

- Ceramie 12 potUlon rptary awttch 

* SO— 239 recvptianal lo lran»TTittBr 

* Random wire lunar 

* 3DQ0 volt capacitor ipacing 

* Tapped inductor 

* Ceramic antennn feed iNru' 

. 7 ■ W, 5'^ H. B" D,. Waiflht- 5 Ite, 



Openers 



SKYMASTER 

A IvMv dMvlfltMd an 
■■TtKBl ■KlwnfM ap«cn 

■dWlMtHlMiWh 




i 



«iid HO TripL IJLVIUTTEn a 

vtHVaHv m HIV pOS^F H9Bf ^n^ ll rOff 
inctl^^Hi 111 otgt ijppr (rii^ [jt 



5S4.50 



AI^Q IW m |*|«n*tOi' fw tap mountkna oh 
SKVMASTER. 



1 J 1 J fast 

T fwt brilind ■ t It fttot 
■Itmini t^d dnH. Jt rintft S2 ohfn D9IJI 

• dkH%«tAc* in on-HH-iir p«-farnwnai !)•- 
LHlnf. 4 A 6 Forwird Giin Owir Dlpoli. 



$29.50 



$129.50 



$59.50 



J*\L 



SKVCLAW 



Read fortvard 

and refiected 

watts at the 
same time 





high pB^Hi 

l«r 40. n, IH 

SKTCLAAI pw( roM 






Tt^ 



i 



Tuning ii *iiv and rillitil* nugpn ci>n 
ctfuenwi niurH that Ehii Hft^tu^lHHlLn^ 
unit h •mmmihviQtpat «nd Eurwinn rwDrfv 
{ft 100 (nnh wimtlt.. HaiHJki full k-pi 

pgwtF ijlmit. 



$79.50 



V 



AIJ.aAIID[x:}USL£T 
fta AM bqd t>MN*f 4^ 

taut hMtfiK <rf TM fwt tH fa, tVHdid 
CdlHH'J ilTti ijwjii it mvf Ih nwdw iharMr 
M flwaHiartp Thii nmdd DauMtl n Bntif 
fad l4\rHiih 100 fwt o« 4B0 o4wi PVC 
eDTWfld bitiPHml trmirniillofli ilfm 17m 
■iiimbiy II BomplBtA, Add Fop« to itw 
mntit tnd pull up inta poilltpfi. Tu4ie 

Veuri on 10 IhfOPflh 160 mnnipi with 
onBtnlmnil fiatr lUtl far iPMObnTfim 
All a»ndOh!Wbi*i 



Tirad of cnrtitsnt Snrilchtn^ and yia wn i k ? 

ivanr in^iOMS iiaai knfHvt ha muit read bcth fotiAwd and re«ena wattaga wmultanaouEly 

lor dutpvtactirH^b, Soupvaila witir theOtoTron M'^ Dual m In^Wactmatir. 



Thf !hATr4A CX 1 Vfrtnjij AnttfHM ti 
cbit|ntd tv Ul* iwrfHrrntnc* mkn4«d 

aa Httr, m iHn. ^. i«h 



$24.50 



$99.50 



$59.50 






DRAKE TVI FILTERS High Pass Filteis for TV SvU 

provide more than 40 cLB attenuation at 52 MH?. and lower. 
Protect the TV set £rom amateur transmitters 6*160 meters. 



Drake TV-300-HP 

Model No. 1603 

For 300 ohm twin lead 

Price: $10.60 



DRAKE TV-a300-LP 

1000 watts mMx. b«low 30 
MHz. Attenuation better thari 
80 dB above 41 MHz. Helps 

TV i-f inter ference, as well as 
TV front-end problems. Price: 
$26.60 Model No. 160E 





Drake TV*75*HP 

Model No. 1610 
For 75 ohm TV coaxial 
cable; TV type 
connectors installed 
Price: $13,25 




LOW PASS FILTERS FOR TRANSMITTERS 

have four pi sections for aharp cut off below channel 2^ and to 
attenuate transmitter harmonics falling Ln any TV channel and 
fm band. 52 ohm. SO-239 connectors built in. 

DRAKE TV-5200-LP 

200 watts to 52 MHz. Ideal 
for six meters. For operation 
below six meters^ use 
TV- 3300- LP or TV-42-LP. 

Model No. 1609 Price: $26,60 

DRAKE TV-42-LP Model No. 1605 

is a four section dter designed witii 43.2 MHz cut-off and 

extremely hi^ attenuation in all TV cbanneU for trarismilteis 

opera ting at 30 MHz and lowers Rated 100 watts input. Price: 

$14.60 




Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue m Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617J 395-8280 

WORK ALL REPEATERS WITH OUR NEW SYNTHESIZER II 






KX2S1. 



RX28t W/T, 
KXSOC Kit 

RX50C W/T 
KX !44t Kii 

RXI44L W/T 
KX320C Kir 

HX220t' W/T 
RX432C Kit. 

kX4J2C' W/T 

TXSO - . . - 
TX50W/T. . 
TXi44B Kit . 
TX144B W/T 
TX220BKit . 



PA2S01H Kit . 



PA2S01H W/T. 
PA40iOH Kit . 

PA4010H W/T. 
PA50/2 5 Kit - 

l*A50/2^ W/T . 
PA 144/1 5 Kit . 



PA 144/2 5 Kit. 
PAi20/l5 Kit . 
PA422/10 Kit . 

PA140/I0W/T 
FA140/30 W/T 



PSI5C Kit 



PSl SC W/T 
PS25C Kit , 



PS2SC W/T . . 
PS25M Kit. . . 
PS25M Wfl . . 

RPTSO Kit, . , 

RPTSO 

Rn 144 Kit . . 

HPT2Z0 Kit . . 

RPT432 Kil , , 

RPTI44W/T . 
RPT220W/T . 
RPT432 W/T . 
OPLASO . . . . 

TRXSO Kit . 



TRX144 Kit 
TRX220 Kit 
TRX4 35 Kit 

TRG-J . . . 
TRC-2 . . , 

SYN [[ Kit. 



SYN II W/T 
MO-1 Kit. . 
TO- J Kit . . 



HT 144B Kit 

NICAD. . , . 
BC12 . .\ - 
Rubber Duck 



26- J 5 MH.' I M receiver \%itli 2 
poll? 10,7 MH/ crystal filtei . . , S 
sttme lis yhove -wire J ^ lasted . . I 
JO-t>tJ Mil/ rcvr w/2 ptrlt' 10.7 
WHjT crvslal fiiitfr ,...,. 
sjme iis jhovL'-wirtid it lestetl . 1 
I4f>j70 MH/ rt'vf w/2 poitr 

i0,7 Mil/ uryMiiMilter 

sciiTit? as above vvirtJ & tti^iteti - . 1 
2 10' 240 MH? rfvr w/2 poEe 

10,7 MH/ crystal fiLter 

sumi: ;is abuVe— wired i ttistetl . . J 
43 2 MH/. rtvrw/3 pole 10^7 

MHi^^rystiil filter . , . , 

^aiiu" !ift ilh^n^;- wired 4i; Te'^teii , . 1 

transmitter exciter, 1 watt. 6 mtr. 
same as above— wired & tested . . 
tra.n£mitter txciter — J watt -2 mtri 
same as ab<sve -wired & te$ted. . . 
tra n sm it te r e x c i ter - J w"a ( i - 2 2 

JVI n £ •■* 9' It •■'■*' P *1 fl ""i'.- g - - Ih 

2 mtr power aii;^ kitlwin-25w 
OLit with sajid Mate switching, 
taie^ H;;onnectori .......... 

same as above— wired &l tested . , 

2 mtr power 3mp- 1 Ow in— 40w 

out -relay switching. . 

same as above -wired &. t^s^ted . , 
6 mtr power amp, 1 w in, 2 5w nut. 
less casts connectors & svi-itching . 
same as above, wired &. tested . ^ . 

3 mtr power amp— Iw im — 1 5w 
out— less case, connectors and 

switching .,.,.,,.. 19.95 

same as PA 144/1 5 kit but 25w . . 49.95 
similar to PA 144/15 for 22 MHj 39,95 
power amp-simili^r in PAJ44/15 
except ]0war]d432 MHz , , , . . 49.95 
JOw in-l40w Qut-2 mtr amp . . 179.95 
30w iTi"l40w out-2 mtr limp . . 15 9,93 



1 5 amp--l 2 volt regujateii power sup- 
ply w/casei w /fold-back current iimit- 
ing and overvoltage protection , , 79.95 
same as ubove -wired & tested . . 94.9 5 
25amp— 12 voJt reguiattid power sup- 
fjly w/cast,w /fold-back current llmit- 

irig and ovp . . . , 8 2 9.95 

same as above -wired St tested l 4 9.95 

^me as PS25Cwith meters .... 149.95 
same as above -wired it tested , . 169.95 



59,95 

04,9 5 

04. "^S 

69.95 
I 4.95^ 

ft 9. ^5 

14.95 

79/95 
24.95^ 

39.95 
59.95 
29.95 
49.95 

39.95 



59,95 

74. 9S: 

59-95 
74.95 

49.95 
69.95 



repeater-*^ meter. . . ^ ^ . , , . . 
repeater -6 meter^ wired & tested 
repeater- 2 mtr- 1 Sw— complete 
(Itiss crys£al$) ............ 

repeater— 2 2D MHi- 1 Sw— comple 
(less cry.5tal.5) ■ ............ 

repeater- iO watt -432 MHz 
O^ss crystalii) .,-.....,,.. 

repeater I 5 watt -2 mtr. - , . . . 
repeater- I 5 watt- 220 MHz. . . . 

repealer — JO Wat t— 43 2 MHz. . . . 

6 mtr c!ose spai;ed dupl^xer . . . . 



465.95 
695. 9S 

46 5.95 



te 



46 5.9 S 

515.95 
695.95 
695.95 
749-95 
S7S.00 



Complete 6 mtr KM transceiver kit, 
20w out^ 10 channel scan with case 
(less mike and crystals). ...... 249.95 

same as above, but 2 mtr & 1 Sw out 2 1 9,95 
same as above except for 22 MHr 219.95 
same as above except |0 watt and 

432MHz 254.95 

transceiver case only 19,95 

transceiver case and accessaries . . 39.95 



fi 



2 mtr synthesizer^ traiiBmitt offsets 
rogrammahle from 1 00 KHz- 10 MHz, 
Mars offsets with optional 
adapters) , . . ^ 4 i ► ^ * » . . . - 169,95 
same as above -wired St tested . . 239.95 
Mars/cap offset optional ...... 2.50 

18 MHi optional tripler .»,,.. 2^50 



2 mtr, 2w, 4 channel, hand held receiver 
with crystals for 146,52 simplex. . 129.95 
battery pack, 12 VDCt'^^amp. . . 29.95 
battery charger for above . . . . , 5.95 
2 mtr, with male BNC cunnector . 8.95 



The Synthesizer U is a two meter frequency synthe- 
sizer. Frequency is adjustable in 5 kHz steps from 
140.00 MHz to 149.995 MHz with its digital readout 
thumb wheel switching. Transmit offsets are digitally 
programmed on a diode matrix, and can range from 
10 kHz to 10 MHz, No additi^jnal components are 
necessa^ry ' 
Kit . . , . ,\ , , . $169,95 Wired and tested$239.95 



RECEIVERS 




TRANSMITTERS 




POWER AMPLIFIERS 





HXCF . 



RF3S Kit . . 
RFSO Kit . 
Rl 144D Kit, 
ftF220D Kit. 

Rr432 Kit, . 

tV 10.7F Kit 

rM4S5 Kit. . 
AS2 Kit . . . 

TX2 2 0B W^ 
TX432fl Kit 
TX432BW/'r 
TXI50 Kit . 
TXISO W/T . 



Blue Line 



Model 

BLB 3/150 
BLC 10/70 
BLC 2/70 
BLC 10/150 
BLC 30/150 
BLD 2/60 
BLD 10/60 
BLD 10/120 
BLE 10/40 
BLE 2/40 
BLE 30/80 
BLE lO/SO 



ffccfissory fnter for above receiver kits 
gives 70 dB adjuc^ent ohannL-^l 

rejection . . ". ^ . 

10 mtr RF front end 10,7 MHz otit I 
6 mtr KF front end 10.7 MHz uut I 
2 mtr R V front end tO,7 MH? nut 1 
22 MM/ RK front end 10-7 MHz 

out 1 

432 MH^ RFTrontend 10.7 MH? 

out . . /k 2 

10,7 MHz IF module includes 2 
pole crystal ftlEer ... .. . . * ^ , . 

455 KHz II itage pEus KM deiectuf 
aadi€ ,and squelch board , ..,..., 



a. 50 
2.50 
2.50 

7.50 

7.50 

7.50 

7,50 
7,50 
5.00 



same as above— wired ^ tested . 4 9.95 

transmitter e.iciter 432 MH^ . , . 39.*^S 

j^iime as above -wired & tested . . 5*5,95 

JOO nTilliwatt. 2 nUr trsinsmitter . 19,95 

ssjmt* ys above -\^i^ed & lested - 29.95 



. RF power amp, wired 
CW'FM-SSB/AM 

Power 
Frequency input 

4 5' 5SMH? 3W 

1401 60 MH 2 lOW 

140-160MH2 2W 

140-1 60 MH2 lOW 

l40'160MHi 30W 

22O-23OMH2 2W 

220-230MHZ lOW 

220-230MHj^ lOW 

420470Mli2 lOW 

420-470MHZ 2W 

42 0-470 MHz 30W 

420'47DMHz I OW 



^ t^stedn efniisSftrn- 



Power 
Output 

I 5QW 

70W 

70W 

I SOW 

150W 

60W 

60W 

1 20W 

40W 

40W 

SOW 

SOW 



TBA 

1 39.95 
159.95 

2 59.95 
239.95 
159 9 5 
I 39.95 
259.95 
139.95 
159.95 
259.95 
2S9.95 



POWER SUPPLIES 




adds over voltage protcctian to your 
power supplies, I 5 VDC" max, 9,95 

12 volt -power supply rcguuior t:ard 
vvith fold-hack current limiting . . B.95 
new Commercial duty 30 amp 12 VDC 
regulated power supply w/csisei 
w/fold-back current limiting and 
overvokage prE>tBetion ...... 239,95 



REPEATERS 




nPLAl44 

DPLA220 

DPLA432 
DSC-U . . 

13SC N . . 



2 mtr. ftOO KHz spaced duplexer, 

wired jnd tuned tfj frequtmo , . . 37*>.9S 

2 20 Ml"[z duple.Ker, wired and 

tuned to frequency 379,95 

rack mount duplexer , . . .*.. ... 319,95 

double shielded dupleJter Cdhles 

with PLSS^J cunnectors (pf.) . . . 25,00 

same as abovti with type N 

connectors (pr.) . 25.00 



TRANSCEIVERS 



'^■r 



OTHER PRODUCTS BY VHP ENGINEERING 




SYNTHESIZERS 




WALKIE TALKIES 




t'EM Kit . , 

Cl>2 Kii . . 

rn3 Kit . , 

C(3H2 Kit H 
SC3 Kil . 

Crystals . , 

CWID Kt! . 



CWID . , 
MK' 1 . . 

TSl W/I . 
TSl W/T , 

Tl>3 Kil . 
ID 3 W/I 
HL144 W/T 

HL220 W/I 
HL432 W/ r 



10 ehitnnel receive ittal deck 

w/ditstie switching, ,..,.... 5 tr* 

10 chanficl >;mit deck w/switch 

and trimmers ....... ^ .. , 14. 

LfHV version of CUi deck, needeii 

lor 433 multi-chiiiint?l fsperittiisriL 12, 

cyrrier t>periited relay . ....,,, 19, 

10 ch^nntrl auio-scan ud:ipter 

for R.K witii prfaritv ,x + * ^-^ » . 19. 
we sintk nujsi repeater Und simpler 

piiirs rroni 14^,0-147.0 (eiit;h). . 5. 
1,59 bit, field pro^ain nibble, code iden- 
tifier with iiuilt-in stiuelch tail Lind 

II) timers ...,.,.,... , '. 39. 

wired and tested, nol pro^jmni m^d 54, 

wired and tested, prnjo-ummed . 59. 
2,000 ohm dynan^JL- cnike with 

iM.'l , ;3nd coil ctjrd . 12.. 

tone squelch decoder S9. 

nistailed in repealer, iuLiu<ti^^ 

inlerfjice ;jcct:ssories JSV. 

2 ttme decoder . , 2^. 

hLime js^ibove— wired ^ tested: . 39. 
4 pi]le helif:j1 res*matrir, wired & tested^ 

swept tuned tu 144 MM/ ban . . 24, 

[lamt'as jib<tvL' imieJ to J20MHz|>an 24. 

same asabtive tuned io4J? MH/ ban ^ 24, 



^5 

95 

95 

95 

95 
00 



95 
95 

95 

95 
95 

4^ 

95 
9^ 

95 




enslneering 

THE WORLD*S MOST COMPLETE LINE OF VHF-f M KITS AMD EQUIPMENT 



Tufts Radio Eiectronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



KLM RF Power Amplifiers 



'ADDON 



POWER! 



160 O ''^' 

WATTS oit 

LINEAR 




A simpler add-on-immedialely 
RF amplifier. 

Merely coax-connect amplifier 
between antenna and transceiver 

No tuning! Efficient strip-line 
broad band design. 

Automatic! Internal RF-sensor- 
controlled relay connects amplifier 
wfienever transmitter is switcfied on. 

Highest Quality, American- made "brand' 
transistors are fully protected for VSWR, 
short and overload, reverse polarity, 
Highly effective tieat sinking assures long 



Manual, remote- position switching 
is optionaL 

Models for 6,2,1 V4 meters, 70CM 
amateur bands plus MARS coverage. 

Two types: Class C for FM/CW. 
Linear for SSB/AM/FM,/CW. 

Negligible insertion loss on receive. 

American made by KLM. 
life, r ©liable performance. Black a nodi zed 
containers., exclusive KLM extrusions, 
t^ave seven, full length fins on 
both sides! 



FRfQ 


MOOEL PWfllNR 


NOM. PWR 


NUM.CUf^ 


$UI 


PRICE 


FREQ MOOfL PWfl INP. 


NDM. pwn 


mm. CUR 


SIZE 


PRICE 


FH£Q. MODEL PWR INR NOM, PWR 


NOM. CUR. 


SIZE PfllCE 


IWIHJI 


HUMBEN iwaElsl 


OUttV'ttlSf 


tamps it 






i^Ht) NUMBER <w5[ts) 


DUTiwaiE$j 


(3rr|i5.Jt 






1WH2) NUMBER 1 watts] OUT.(wat[&j 


<amps.)t 




SD-54 


PM-m^L 4 


sa 


IQA 


C 


T&4.95 


UAU^ ?k\\i^m^lO 5-15 


S9 


10 


c- 


159.95 


400-470 PA2-40C 1-4 40 


7 


C- 149 95 


1^^-I4fi 


PA2-l2fl 1^4 


12 


2 


k 


S995 


PA10-140B 5-T5 


140 


IS 


D' 


T99.95 


PAig'35C 5-15 35 


8 


B' 1T9.95 


" 


l*A?7O0 1-4 


70 


It? 


c* 


159.95 


PA1()-I4<1&L:> 5-15 


140 


IS 


D' 


2t5 95 


PA10-35CLO 5-1 S 35 


6 


8' 130.35 


" 


PA2-7DeLO 1-4 


75 


10 


c- 


169 95 


PA10-160BLV 5-15 


160 


2S 


D* 


229 95 


PA10-70C 5-15 70- 


15 


D' 229 95 


■' 


PA2-140e 1-4 


140 


20 





229.95 


PASO 140B 15-4& 


140 


15 


D' 


179 95 


PA10-70CLO 5-15 n 


ia 


a- 249 95 




PAlO-40e 5-15 


40 


5 


B 


63.55 


PA30-14OBL-:. r5-45 


140 


15 


D' 


169.95 








r^"' 


Pi^iO-JOBLO:5-lS, 


m 


5 


B- 


g4 95 


? 19^226 PA2-70EC 1-4 


70 


10 


C^ 


169,95 


&t2es: IncbtC ■*.?SS-.5.-2 -1. 6 5>:5-^2 


■C. 6,5x7 5k.? 


■0.5 5*10v2 , 


' 


PAia-7oe 5-15 


70 


9 


C" 


139.95 


PAia-60BC 5-15 


60 


e 


t 


149 95 


MM: 5J'!t2;>:&0.l 1fi&..<^27:-.50ft 


1^5^90^50 8 


165>: ?54>-$d,B 


" 


PAlO-7aflLO 5-15 


70 


B 


c 


149 S& 


PA30 120eC 15-45 


\2^ 


15- 


D- 


tfl9.95 


LiMEARAMPUFlEH fAt 13 SVQC 







TEMPO 




THE TEMPO 2020 



* PhMfl (oek-loop ^PLL) os£l^^alo^ circuJt minimises 
uni/vanlen fpunous raeponses. 

* Nvl^rnd Digital Ffaqu^ncy PreS^TitatiOfi. 

v Advanced Sdlid-sc^ifi design. ..only 3 tuCies. 
m Built-in AC and f2 VOC power auppl^eg. 

* CW 1 1 Iter slandpfd equipFnBnl...nDl an acce&SO'y. 
■ f^gfjifled €14&-B FjiiaF 4<in^llfler tut>«s. 

« Cooilnfl fan stsndarct equlpmrenl.-.nol an aocflsaory. 
a Htgh peifDrmanice ndiSs-bFanker is SEandafd 

EquipmenL...no1 an accessory, 
i BuiU-ln VOX end 5^mi-break Jr CW hEfyung: 
i Cry?1al Calithratdj a/id WWV re<:oivp[^g C,a$abMiij|/ 
« Microphofift provided 

* Du3l F^lT cnritral aJlows bolh brdad a.nd narrow 
1 Lining. 

* All band 8[> tnfOUiJfi lO m^teT coverage. 



Mutll-modfl USfi. LSB, CW and AW operallon. 

ExsraDndinary irecai^er sansitiwiiy t.3u S^N 10 dbl 

apiiJosciNalorslabiiitv (lOD Hz 30 m\n. after warm -up I 

FJaed channel crystal control on lw?i awallabfe 

poaitiDni^. 

RF Altenuatof. 

Ai;t|U3t3btE ALC Bcli^n. 

Phone palth In a^d OUl jacHs. 

S&pa^sfe PTT jack for fool awitcti. 

QuIM-in apBakfar. 

The TEMPO £&2l>...$75a.D0. 

ModflJ &12<] ^KTEfnal sp&akcr .529.^. Model 8010 

rernoEB VFO. ,S,t;S9.aO. 



TEMPO 

VHF/ 



ONE PLUS 



The Tempos ONE PLUS offers fuM 25 watt output or a 
selectable 3 to 15 watt low power output, remote tuning 
on the microphone, sideband operation with the 
SSB/ONE adapter, MARS operation capability, 5 KHz 
numerical LED, and all at a lower price than its time tested 
predecessor,,, the Tempo VHP ONE. 

The Tempo VHF/One Plus is s VHF/FM transcetver for 
dependable communication on the 2 meter amateur band • Full 
2 meter coverage, 144 to 148 MHz for botti transmit and receive 

• Full phase lock synthesized (PLL) • Automatic repeater split 
— selectable up or down • Two buflt-in programmabte channels 

• All solid state • 800 selectable receive frequencies with 
simplex and +600 kHz transnnit frequencies for each receive 
chanriel. Price: $399,00 



ATLAS 350-XL 





ALL SOLID STATE 
SSB TRANSCEIVER 



350 WATTS P.E.P. OR CW IMPUT 
10 THROUGH 160 
METER COVERAGE 





Illustrated witti 

optional AC supply, 

Auxiliary VFO, and 

Digital DiaL 

The all new Atlas 350-XL has all the exciting new features you 
want, plus superior peiforniaiice and selectivity control never before 
possible. Price: $995.00 

• 10-160 METERS 

Full coverage of all six amateur bands in 500 kHz segments. Primary 
freQuency control provides higMy stable operation. Also included is 
provLsJon for adding up to 10 additional 500 kH;£ segments between 
2 to 22 MHz by plugging in auxiliary crystals^ 

• 350 WATTS 

P.E.P. and CW input. Enough power to work the world barefooti 
IDEAL FOR DESKTOP OR MOBILE OPERATION 
Measuring 5ust 5 in, high % 12 in> wide x \2y^ in. deep, and weighing 
only 13 pounds, the Atlas 350-XL offers more features^ perfor- 
mance and \Tilue than any other transceiver* regardless of size, on 
the market today i 

• 350-PS matching AC supply — $195,00 

• DD-6XL plug-in digital dial readout $195.00 

• 305 plug-in auxiliary VFO — $155.00 

• 311 plug-in crystal oscillator — $135,00 

• DMK-XL plug-'in mohUe mounting kit— $65,00 



• 




TEMPO ONE HF Transceiver. 80-1 OM. US8, CW & AM - $399.00 
AC/ONE Power supply for TEMPO ONE - $39.00 

VF/ONE External VFO for TEMPO ONE - $199.00 

TEMPO SSB/OIME 

SSB adapter for Ihe Tempo VHF/One 

Selectable upper or Iciwer sideband. * Ptugs directty into the 
V/HF/One with no modification. * Ncise blanker byilt-in. ■ RITand 
VXD for full frequency coverage. ' S225,00 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Bedford MA 02155 • t617) 395-8280 



iHI 




Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (6171 395-8280 





STOP 



THIEF! 




YOUR , 
RADIO ! 




DESIGNED FOR COMMERCIAL USE UP TO 1000 MHZ. 



The TUFTS SAVE-YOUR-RADIO bracket can save you a 
bundle .., and a tot of hassle. Why worry about rig ripoff? The 
TUFTS SYR bracket mounts quickly and easily in ycxjr car and 
makes Ft possible to snap your rig out of its bracket when you park 
and pKii it out of sights 

The connector system hds a special coaxiaf cable connector 
v^ich will provide you with a lossless connection r't^i up to 100O 
MHz! No lossi In addition to the quick coax connactor there are 
also four power and accessory connections which are made 
automatically when the rig is slid into Its bracket . . , just what you 



need for feeding power and loudspeaker connections to the set. 

This is a rugged bracket mvi connector system . . . it'll take a 
beating. There is a hole on each side of the 16 gauge steel plate for a 
padlock in case you want to leave the rig fof short periods in its 
bracket. They'll has« to rip out the dash to get it . . . and it won't be 
the first lime for that. 

With two of these brackets you can bring the mobile rig into 
the house and use it m seconds. On trips you can take an AC supply 
for the rtg and use it in your hoteJ room. Price: S29.9S 



400% MORE RF POWER 
PLUGS BETWEEN YOUR MICROPHONE AND TRANSMITTER 




$ 



49 



95 




LSP-S300X' 30 tSi dyfidmic nngv tC tog amp mvt i 
Ktive fillen give clean audio WP pnHMClM] 9 V 

iru} outpm 2-3116 I 3-t(4 x * inchM 



L5P-S2l^fiX II. Samfi u LSP'S^OBX bui m « 
tim^ui^iu. 2iiB ■ >5JfB 1 5-9: ^€ n^ch Ttn-t«c 
ii«iclo9Uf9 «nt^ uncximmittcfcl J pin Mwc \Mk 
ouipgi CMUm. niiw> ^unction s«itcti 



SUPER LOGARITHMIC 
SPEECH PROCESSOR 

Up to 400% More RF Power is yours with this plug-in 
unit. S imply plug the WIFJ Super Logarithmic Speech 
Processor between your microphone and transmitter and 
your voice is suddenly transformed from a whisper to a 
Dynaniic Output 

Your signal is full of punch with power to slice through 
QRM and you go from barely readable to "solid copy OM." 




$ 



27 



95 




$ 



49 



^ij 




CWF2BX Super CW Filtsr 

B) iMf ttm JBMJm. Di«f 5Q0Q in ui*. Rmn* tJW^ 

■ihtni Mo lini^inA. iPimi b*tw«wi' r »M li » i «a4 
phorvM or conno ct tu f i n kucMo cltflu tor 

on* oclJWB Inwri asntw if^ ol 7S0 Hr fe* 90 H^r 
BW m Rwli«»S ttoise IS de * fi V biliMY 
- J-3*16 « 3r1 M It * in. • CWF'JPC, *<red PC 
EuvtS; Sie.9& * CWF 2PCK, kit PC bcirti t^ftm 



CtiOS-B043 Electmn»c Keycr 

SI All ol 1h« #rl design ufe*! CURTtS-AOO 

• Sijii^in Key « OdT rr^mont * l«in|>tc 009*9- 
Uon atiirt mvt&m^i $qii««<7« Hey * i 1^ ^ 
WPfyi « SK)e1a«»e and ^p«ritef • ^ipm<l. vol- 
lime. 1i>n?, weiQtIi iianlfiQlt • UMfft fcliotjlfl iNOHd 
Vtal0 heiung ^300 UC^IV mtJf ■ * pOkOK^n 
««ilch Ibf TU^4E OFF ON SIDE TONE OFF 
■ Lhses 4 penllghi cells * 2-in6 i 3^1/4 x 4 



NEW 



HFi-lfiDIO Anlsnna Turisr 

NwMi ^ptHj &n idjKiriiv ntl bwn4 — IW thru fO 
Mfriera ^- «tifi a tjriQb ritmotn win bh^ mn irvur 
tifll irawhmliK p&mm fiutout — vp Hi 300 wctti 
flF poww OUTPUT. 

high 'mpedanc^ by JnUrt^tiflngii^o inotti ind 

wbEte range, tiigh pedotirninu. i i potition tkDped 
jr>diic:|cir Usas two BlAcJuid 4oroi^ ctv^* 




NEW 



C^O-SSS Code Osdlltlor 

FfH ihc Qlct TifFwir Id peii»h ht« fiiil 

Fof Ttv Code Imtmctw lo l«Kh liii clBf««», 




$ 



2995 ^ft^ZJ^^^^/iQ 



m Send cn«p dear cotltr wim ptenty ol voHinie tor 

u^ne. tone co^ingle. ^utriirtum c^b^rfai • 9 V 
b^iiefy • Tcrp qufl^jtir U S caHtlruCliCHTi ■ U:^e» 
555 JC linrnfif • 2-3^1ft » 31'* • * incPies 

W-S5&, Optjoitaj Te(e§fwh tt*? Si 95 



95 



seF-2ex ssa Finer 



.OismaiLullir Inipnvai readabfUIyi 

■ Optimises your audtc IQ reducf tidfbJind 
!ip|jiirer riifttciye Low arn^ ntgNi pircl^od Of^M, hJ&9. 
SUiihC c^^AQS Dochgnsupid nom, 60 vrd T^ Hr 
fturti « f^diuc^^A r^(E)tie durimg con^cnr E3^ vtEl 
nqchewinQ * Rugs between prxiFwt «nd ■«' 
crnvrnt 01 ccHin^cT Mtwfefi lu^k} itAg* fv tfHMttt 
Opc-tJirtQiFi • 5fil»clal}te b^ndwidih IC «cl^v• 
Audio MtcT * U^ses ^ won tStlwY « i-S'lfi 1 
1-1 jj ^ 4 incfte* 



MFJ-2006X Fro^iuency Sl^nd^rd 

Proviil» Strang, pr«c!«a mcrii«n Wiry 100. 90. or 
U KHi M«tl Into VHF rtgion- 

• Estciusive circuilrv 9uDpmSH« til unwanted 
marliafg • Marltwa we o*l*d COf potttiv* idtnth 
ItcAtion CMOS iG's. wprh iFBn&nfllor out^m • No 
direct connection nec«irlary • Unit t fott 
Dotiery * Adtusiatiie imttmer lot aro tiMiung to 
WWv ■ Swiicti seiecis lOQ 5&. S KHf or Of F 



MFJ-1030BX HeceWBt PrtssJftCtor 

Clearliy copy waak unnudablt lignjiii ilncmtM 
signal 3 lo S "5"' uilllth 

i More ihan 2CI dB IOmt rpolM o^'" * Sep^^rate 
inpuj and Qiilpul [uning cflnifuii (jiie maiimu'm 
g&yr\ and f^f 9«i#c;iivfty 10 EignLrMcamt^ ieioct 
oui^-bartd signatt fvid m&M* imiot leK^Ait^ 
• DuiHi gate MOS ^ET tor icm ndlW'. «tforugi iiipiil 
iwxjivnQ abtitiies • CQfri!,iQie{y tUtfyim * Op- 
hmtZE^ for ID THru 10 WHf a 4 V t».ll4irv 




$ 



27 



95 



MFJ-40T ORP Transmlllir 

Wark ttia ^odd wUN S wmii on 40 Malar CW, 

■ IVQ [uninig * MitE'tihiu iO <it^m Um^ % Cleati 
output wiin tow nftfmomc conttnt ■ Po*Bf 
ampliPivt rranuiior tirniaetad agakntt bumoiit 
• Switch 5ei«ai 1 crysiiaif Oi' VFO ►npui • 1^ 
VOC ■ 2-3 MG A 1-1/4 > I tnene^ 

1MFJ-4a¥, CoffipanionVFO S3? 36 

illFj-lSDC, LC RHwajiiad P^mv $<ip#V 

1 amn t^VOC Sa? ^- 



Tufts Radio Electrcwiics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395 8280 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Wledtord MA 02155 # (617) 395^8280 




PROFESSIONAL HEADPHONES 

& HEADSETS 



BOOM MIC HEADSETS 
For the ultimate in communications convenience and efficiency select a boom mic headset. Long-time favorites of professional 
comnnunications, boom mic headsets allow more personal mobility while always keeping the mic properly positioned for fast, precise voice 
transmission. Boom microphones ar© completely adjustable to allow perfect positioning. And, boom mic headsets leave both' hands free to 
perform other tasks. 

All models are supplied with "close- talking" microphones to limit ambient noise pick-up and provide superior intelHglbMity. Each model has 
a convenient, inline push-to-talk switch, which can be wired for either push-to-talk relay control or mic circuit interrupt for voice operated 
transmitters. The switch may be used as a momentary push-button or it can be locked m the down position. All models have tough, flexible, 
8 foot cords which are stripped and tinned, untarminated. Communication grey with black trjm* ._ 







MODELC-eiO 




MODEL C-1210 




MODEL CM-1210 




MODEL €^^-1 320 S 



MODiLCPAetO 



MODEL C-61 Economical, dual receiver 

magnetic headphone. Delivers clear re- 
ception. Lightweight and comfortable yet 
ruggedly constructed for daily use. Ear- 
cushions seal out distracting noise and 
are removable for cleaning, Pricer $9.95 

MODEL SWL-610 Similar to Model C-610 
but with 2000 ohm impedance. Ideal for 
shortwave receivers requiring high im- 
pedance headphones. Price: $9.95 

MODEL C-1210 Medium priced, dual re- 
ceiver dynamic headphone. Precise 
sound reproduction. Deluxe foam-filled 
earctishions are extremely comfortable 
for those long sessions. The removable 
cushions reduce ambient noise penetra- 
tion and concentrate signal strength. 
Great for noisy environments or for dig- 
ging out weak signals, Pricef $28.30 

MODEL C-1320 Our finest communfca- 
tiorts headphone. Audiometric-lype dual 
dynamic receivers assure the ultimate in 
reception and performance stability. Ex- 
tremely sensitive receivers provide high 
output levels even from weak signals. 
Luxurious foam filled circumaural ear- 
cushions are removable for cleaning. 
Price: $37,90 

DUAL MUFF HEADPHONES 
The following headphones offer outstanding sound quality ar^d superb comfort for long term wearing. All the models have circumaural 
earcushions to seal out distracting ambient noise and concentrate the signal at your ear. Foam filled ^/myl earcushions on Models C-1210 and 
C-1320 add an extra margin of comfort. Adjustable headbands and self-aMgnmg eamcups assure proper fit. All models are equipped with a 
five foot cord terminating in a standard .250" diameter phone plug and have 3.2 to 20 Ohm impedance. Communication grey with black 
trim. 

MODEL CM~610 Lightweight, dual receiver 
magnetic headphone (similar to Model 
C'610K Ceramic boom microphone with -E51 
dB output. Can be used with any mobile or 
base station with high Z mic input and 3.2 
to 20 ohm audio output. Price: $42.80. 

MODEL CM 1320 Deluxe dual receiver 
dynamic headphone with audiometric-type 
headphone elements (similar to Model 
C-1320)* Ceramic boom microphone with 
-51 dB output. For use with any mobile or 
base station requiring high impedance mic 
input and 3,2 to 20 ohm audio output. 
Price: $68.30. 

MODEL CM'1210 Rugged, reliable, dual 
receiver dynamic headphone (similar to 
Model C-1210). Ceramic boom microphone 
with -51 dB output. For use with any 
mobile or base station with high ^ input and 
3.2 to 20 ohm audio output. Price: $56.90, 

MODEL CM-1320S Deluxe single receiver 
dynamic headphone with audiometrlc-type 
headphone element [similar to Model 
C-1320), Ceramic boom microphone with 
-51 dB output. For use with any mobile or 
base station requiring high impedance mic 
input and 3.2 to 20 ohm audio output. 
Price; $54.50. 

Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • (617) 395-8280 



MDQEL 


CBID 


SWL610 


C-121D 


C-1320 


CIV! 610 


CM 1210 


CIVI-132D 


CM 1320S 


HefldptioneSensMivity 
Ref.. 0002 Dynes/cm? 
^TmW input. IkH^ 


lOSdBSPL 
±5dB 


103dBSPL 
±5dB 


103dBSPL 

±3dB 


lOSdBSPL 
^dB 


103dBSPL 
^dB 


IDSdBSPL 
^d6 


iDSdBSPL 
=t5dB 


105dBSPL 
±SdB 


Hfi3ftphnne Frequency 
Response (useable) 


40 

15.DD0 Hi 


40 


20- 
20.000 Hz 


20 

20,000 Hz 


40- 
15,000 Hz 


20 

20,000 Hz 


20 

20.000 Hz 


20 

20.000 H^ 


Headphone 
Impedance 


32^ 

20 ohms 


2000ohm^ 


3-2 
20 DhiTSs 


32 

20 ohms 


3.2- 
20 ohm^ 


32 

20 ohms 


32 
20 ohms 


32 
20 tjhms 


Micfoplione 
Frequancy 
Response 


" 


" 


" 


" 


50- 
BOOO Hz 


50- 

eooo Hz 


50- 
8000 Hz 


50 
8000 Hi 


Microphone 
Impedance 


— 


— 




— 


High 


High 


High 


High 


Microphone 

Sensttivity 
Below 1 volt/mrcrabaf 

3t 1kHz 










^5ldB 

-t;5dB 


-5TdB 
±5dB 


-Side 

±5dB 


5TdB 
±bdB 


Cord 


5' 


5" 


b' 1 


6' 


8' 
j2 4mf 


B' 


B' 


g. 


Plug 


.250 -dia- 


.250" dia. 


250" m. 


.250 'dia 


unter 

mingled 


unter- 
[T>inated 


unter- 
mmated 


unlet 
minated 


Gross Weight 


j227g) 


8^1 


12 DZ 

I341g) 


15 oz 

I426g] 


12 0? 


f5o; 


leoz. 

t5iigl 


12 oz. 
(341 g) 


Catalog Number 


61630063 


61630.062 


61210-031! 


61320 012 


61630-064 


eT200058i 


61320 013 


61320 015 



















Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 02155 • {617* 395-S2S0 



Ji^ 





TUFTS SELECTED TITLES OF 
POPULAR SAMS PUBLICATIONS 




RADIO HANDBOOK (20th Edition) 



by WifUam L Qrr. WGSAi AccmpleieJy updated 20th edition of the famous communica- 
tions handbook that is the electfonics industry standard for engineers, techniCfans, arid 
advanced an^ateurs. Explains in authoritative detail how to design and t^uild all types of 
radiocommunjcahons equipment. Contains greatly enlarged section on semioanductor 
and IC circuit design , Includes ssb design and equipment; rtty circuits: finear amplifiers, 
tJOtti soHd-state and tyde types; vhf and uhf transmitters and converters; as well as 
special-purpose and logic circuitry, plus completely revised chapter on electronics 
mattiemattcs 1080 pages; BVj x 9V4; hardbound, 

No. 24032 $19.50 

HAM AND CB ANTENNA DIMENSION CHARTS 

by Edward M Noti. W3F0J. Tabulates dimension information in teet and inches for ail 
the popular antenna contigitrations. Gives data tor dipole antennas, qyarter-wave 
verticals, two element beams, quads, Irj angles, inverted dipo^es, and inverted vees 
Includes inlormation lor cutting transmission lines to a preferred wavelength, dimen- 
sioning phasing lines., cutting a matching ^tub, and spacing antenna elements. 64 
pages, 6 x 9; soffbound. 
No. 24023 %ZJ5 

COMMERCIAL RADIOTELEPHONE LICENSE QUESTION & 
ANSWER STUDY GUIDE (3rd Edition) 

by Edward M. NoU. Pre pa res the reader to take the examinations for the various grades 
of radioLeiephone licenses. Emphasizes those subjects that are most important or most 
liiceiy to be misunderstood. The questions are representative ot those used in the FCC 
examinations. 304 pages: 6x9; softbound. 
No. 24033 $9.50 

RADIO TRANSMITTER PRINCtPLES AND PROJECTS 

by tdwBrd W, Ncft. W3FQJ Devoted entirely to the sutJject of radio transmitters, this 
tjook is a helpful gathering of modern transmitter principles, ideas, circuits, techniques, 
and I earn-by 'doing projects. Covers Bipolar CW and A-M Transmitter Circuits, 
Transistor/Tube Circuits, Basic Principles of SSB-DS8 Generation, Integrated Circuit 
Fundamentais, VHF.'VHF Circuits and Principles, Frequency Modulation, and more. 
320 pages; 5^/i -n B^/z: soil bound. 
No. 24031 $6.95 

73 DIPOLE AND LONG-WIRE ANTENNAS 

by Edward M. Noif, W3FQJ Covers practically every type of wire antenna used by 
amateurs. Gives dimensions, configurations, and construction data for 73 different 
antennas, plus appendices covering construction of noise bridges, line tuners, and 
data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity tactor, and swr. 160 pages; SVs x BVt; 
soft bound. 
No. 24D06 $5.S0 

7a VERTICAL, SEAM, AND TRIANGLE ANTENNAS 

by Edward M. NofL. W3F0J. The second book in a series of practical antenna construc- 
tion and design methods. Contains data on practicably ail types used by amateurs. Not a 
rehash of previously published data, but a oompiiation of the author's own experiments 
with various antenna contigu rations. The 73 different antennas have all been t)uilt and 
air -tested by the author. 160 pages: 5Vj x BVii soft bound. 
No. 24Q21 $5.50 

FIRST-CLASS RADIOTELEPHONE LICENSE HANDBOOK 
(4th Edition) 

by Edward M, NotL An e^ceilent study guide tor the first -class radiotelephone license 
examination. Contains all the material needed to pass Element iV of the FCC examina- 
tion, including all the questions and answers found in the latest FCC Study Guide. Has 
Ihree simulated examinations, presented in the muftiple-choice form of the FCC tests, 
as well as answers and evaluations to help the reader find his weak areas. 416 pages; 
5V^ X 8Va; scflbound. 
No. 21144 17.95 



SECOND-CLASS RADIOTELEPHONE LICENSE HANDBOOK 
(5th Edition) 

by Edward M. Noil Provides all the study material needed to pass the FCC second- 
class radio telepiione license examination {Elements I, II, and itl). Ali mater Lai js based 
on the FCC Study Guide and Reference Matermi for Commerciaf OpersitOf Examina- 
tion. Two tests are included to simulate the actuai examination. 44B pages; 5 V2 m 8^,^; 
sottboond. 

No. 21111 $7.95 



THIRD-CLASS RADIOTELEPHONE LICENSE HANDBOOK (4th 
Edition) 

hy Edward M. Nofi. Serves as a practical study guide for the aspiring radio operator as 
well as a ready reference tor those working in the field. Designed as a study aid for 
obtaining licenses up to and including the Radioieiepbone Third -Class Operator Permit 
with Broadcast Endorsement, this newest edition contains questions and answers 
similar to those given on the actual examination. 208 pages; ^V2 x SV^; softbound. 
No. 21353 $S.§S 



CMOS COOKBOOK 

by Don Lancaster. Tells all you need to know to understand and profitably use this 
Ir^expensive and genuinely fun to work with digital logic family. First an explanation of 
what CMOS is. how it works, and how to power it, plus usage rules, state testing, 
bread boarding, interface, and otiier basics is given. Then a minicataiog of over 100 
devices, including pin outs and use descriptions is given. Subjects covered include gate 
fundamentals, tri- state logic, redundant logic design techniques, multivibrators, non- 
volatile memory techniques, clocked JK and D flip-fiops, counter and register tech- 
niques, op amps, analog switches, phase-locked loops and much more. A must for the 
student, hobbyist, teachers, technician, or engineer who wants to learn about CMOS. 
Filled with practical applications. 416 pages; SVa x flVa: softbound. 
Ho. 2t39a $9.95 

IC OP-AMP COOKBOOK 

by Waiter G. Jung. The first book of its kind to be published Covers not only the basic 
theory of the IC op amp in great detail, but aJso includes over 250 practical circuit 
appii cat i on s , I iber a 1 1 y 1 1 1 u st rat ed . O rg a n ized into t hree b as ic pa rts : i ntrodu ctl n to the I C 
op amp and general considerations, practical circuit applications, and appendixes of 
manufacturers' reference material, 592 pages; 5V^ x BVz: softbound. 
No. 20969 $12^95 

IC TIMER COOKBOOK 

jby Waiter Jung. Provides an excel lent intrcnduction to the field of IC timers by presenting 
a collection of various circuit "recipes" usetui in applying the devices. Arranged In three 
parts, the first part gives basic and generalized information. Part II, the appiic aliens 
section, is the "meat" of the book and includes over too different circuits for a wide 
range of uses. Part 111 contains reproductions of manufacturers data sheets, second 
source manufacturers, and more. This book is a valuable reference for the hobbyist, the 
technical or engineering student, or professional. 28S pages; St^a x BV2] softtiound. 
No. 214ie $9,95 



TTL COOKBOOK 

by DQnafd Lancaster. A complete and detailed guide to transistor-transistor logic 
(TTLJ. Explains what TTL is, how It works, and how to use it. Discusses practical 
applications, such as a digital counter and display system, events counter, eieotronic 
stopwatch, digital voltmeter, and a digital tachometer. 33^ pages; 51^^ x flVSt; softbound, 
No, 21035 Si.95 



HOW TO BUY & USE MINICOMPUTERS* MICROCOMPUTERS 

t>y WlfHam Bsrden, Jr. Discusses these smaller computers and shows how I hey can be 
used in a variety of practical and recreational tasks in the home or business, Explains 
the basics of minicomputers and microcomputers, their hardware and software, 
peripheral devices available, and the various programming languages and techniques. 
Includes selection, buying, and programming your own system and gives detailedi 
descriptions oi currently availattie systems. 240 pages; &Vj x 1 1 ; softbound. 
No. 21351 $9.95 

MICROCOMPUTER PRIMER 

by MitcheU Waite and Michaef Pardee Introduces the beginner to the basTc principles 
of the microcomputers. Discusses the five main parts of a Computer — Central process- 
ing unit, memory, input.i'output interfaces, and programs. The important characteristics 
of several weli-kncwrr microprocessors are given and a chapter is included on pro- 
g ramming your owr> microcomputer. 224 pages; 5Vi x SW; softbound. 
No. 21404 17,95 



THE 8080A BUGBOOK: MICROCOMPUTER INTERFACING 
AND PROGRAMMING 

by Peter H. Rony, David G. Larsen, and Jonathan A. Titus. The principles, concepts, 
and applications of an 8-t)it microcomputer based on the 8030 microprocessor tC chip. 
The emphasis is on the computer as a controtler. Covers the tour fundamental tasks of 
computer interfacing- (t) generation of strobe and device select pulses; (2) iatchingof 
accumulator output; (3) acquisition of input data by the accumulator; (4) generation of 
interrupt signals to the computer. Intended to heip develop the skills needed to use an 
S080-based breadboard microcomputer system. 5Vz k 8Vz; softbound. 
No. 21447 $9.95 



Tufts Radio Electronics • 209 Mystic Avenue • Medford MA 021 5B • (617) 395-8280 



PRINTED CIRCUIT 
SUPPLIES 

Pre-notched and routed 
blanks to fit S-100 bus type 
computers; also 22 pin sized 
blanks for .156 spacing. 
Positive acting resist; drill 
bit assortments; carbide 
bits; bubble etchers. W. H, 
Brady & Datak artwork. 

Z^apper strip/wrap/unwrap 
tool + 25 foot spool of #30 
wire; $6.00 ppd. . 

TRUMBULL COMPANY 

833 Baira Dr.. El Cerrito, CA 94530 




ON 
TARGET 



with 

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for 

• CB Synthesized • CB Standard 
• General Cominunications 

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• Monitor • Scanners 

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Dependable USA Mfg. for 

• Frequency Control 

• Frequency Stability 

• High Performance 

WfJTfl or f}hon9 for mom cT^rajJs SBn:i 10* iof ouf fatasi cataiog 



jnN 



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2400 Crystal Drfve 

Ft. My$r», Florida 33901 

all Phonet (813) 936-2397 



J2 




THE PERFECT 



PROFESSIONALIZE YOUR STATION 

Avoid interrupffons at home— your family and friends will know youVe 
^ ON THE AIR". 

Mount on desk or above door at your station— adjustable 
mounting bracket mcluded. 



Plexiglass face plate enclosed in 
black satin-finish steel case. 

1 Va-inch brflliantfy illuminated 
RED letters. Unit sii:e: 10%' x 

AN OUTSTANDING GIFT ITEM. 

BIJIE[S) MOT 1NCLUQED 



S'F AMATEUR RADIO SERVICES S33 

P,0. BOX 10-20 GATEWAY STATION 
CULVER CITY, CA 90230 

Please send ^signs (a) $15*95 each- 
Post Paid— check or money order enclosed* 
Co Iff. residents add 6%. 



PLEASE PRINT 



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City 

State _ 



2lp. 



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TEE/AX PRESENTS; 






THE FIRST 



Coax Toggle Switch $39.95 
Coax Relay Version $55.95 



I 



Patent Pending 



TEE/AX, INC 

5701 N.W. 31st AVENUE 

FT. LAUDERDALE, 

FLORIDA 33309 




.tm.m. s^^^o&f ^ifp-'sw^c- 



m- 




Distributor Inquiries 
Invited 




Model SW 5000 



• 52 ohms 

• SPOT, DPDT 

• Power 1KW 

• All Brass 
Construction 

• Teflon 
Insulated 

• Captivated 
Internal 
Contacts 

• Available in 
UHF, BNC.N, 
F^ all series 






J 









2BS 



AT AT 




Mail Orders Accepted — Add 75(t for Postage 



149 



One Cent Channels 

for the IC-22S 



-- inflation fighter! 



Bob Edgett WB2CBC 
Waneta Edqeti WA2HGQ 
39 Dexter Parkway 
BaidwinsviUe NY 1 3027 



Frequency Hbk 


490-8C 


1 4 7. 000= A E 


147.510=00 




505=8 D 


015-AF 


B25=D1 


146,010=60 


520=8 E 


147.030^80 


540=D2 


02b=6D 


535=8 F 


045^B1 


555=03 


O40-6E 


146.550=90 


060=82 


570=04 


055 -6 F 


565=91 


075=B3 


585-D5 


146.070-70 


580-92 


090-B4 


600=D6 


065=71 


595=93 


105-85 


615=D7 


1 00-72 


610-94 


120=B6 


630=08 


115=73 


625-95 


135=B7 


645=09 


130=74 


640-96 


150=B8 


660= DA 


145=75 


655=97 


165=89 


675- DB 


160=76 


670=98 


180=BA 


690- DC 


175^77 


685^9 


196=BB 


705=00 


190-78 


700=9A 


210=BC 


720=De 


205=79 


715=9B 


225^6 D 


735=DF 


220=7A 


730=9C 


240=8 E 


147. 750= EO 


235=7B 


745=9 D 


265=BF 


765= El 


250=7C 


760-9 E 


147.270-CO 


780= E2 


265-7D 


775=9F 


2S5=C1 


795= E3 


280-7 E 


146. 790= AO 


300=C2 


810-E4 


295=71= 


805=A1 


315=C3 


825-E5 


14S, 310^80 


820= A2 


330=C4 


a40=E6 


325=81 


835= A3 


345=C5 


855= E7 


340-82 


850= A4 


360-C6 


870- E8 


355=83 


865-A5 


375=C7 


885=E9 


370=84 


880^A6 


390=CS 


900= E A 


385-85 


895=A7 


405-C9 


915=EB 


400=86 


910=A8 


420=CA 


930=EC 


415=87 


925=A9 


435=CB 


945= ED 


430=88 


940-AA 


450- CC 


960= EE 


445=89 


955= A B 


465=CO 


976= EF 


460=SA 


970=AC 


480- CE 


147.990=F0 


475=SB 


146.985=AD 


495=CF 





Ffg. L Hexadecimal for fC-22S. 



The recent arrival of 
[corn's new IC'22S has 
comptelely changed ihe 2 
meter FM iransceiver market. 
The most noted change is ihe 
decrease in cost, for a unit 
which has the features of a 
synthesizer. The IC-22S only 
requires you to program a 
diode matrix board for the 
common frequencies that you 
will be using with the 22 
selector positions. This makes 
for very convenient opera- 
tion, with an even greater 
advantage over a regular 
synthesized unit while in 
mobile use. We have been 
able to create the best of the 
crystal controlled rig^ and the 
synthesized units, with a 
slight modification of the 
22S. 

The modification, which 
should cost only a little over 
^2.00, simply consists of 
making use of the 23rd posi- 
tion of the setector switch, 
with the addition of a minia- 
ture 8 position DIP switch. 
This will allow for pro- 
gramming this position at any 
time^ for any unusual fre- 
quency that you desire, at 



any standard 15 kHz spacing* 
The location thai was picked 
to mount the 8 position DIP 
switch was on the underside 
of the radio, between the 
matrix board and the front 
panel. This allows minimum 
wire length, convenience of 
operation! sind very little 
modification to the unit. 

The first item that is 
required is a small piece of 
vector or printed circuit 
board, approximately 1 3/8'* 
by V, to mount the switch 
on. The best source of this 
materia! might be one of your 
surplus computer boards 
from which you have re- 
moved a 16 pin integrated 
circuit Due to the limited 
mounting space, this makes 
for an easier installation than 
using an \C socket and asso- 
ciated hardware. 

Simply drill two #39 holes 
in the rear lip of the front 
pane! to secure the printed 
circuit board. The right side 
of this PC material should be 
aligned with the position 19 
of the matrix board to allow 
for ample mounting space. 
The first hole has already 
been drilled through the 
piastic portion, so it is only 
necessary to complete the 
hole through the metal por- 
tion. The second hole is 
drilled about 7/8'* to the left. 
Countersink these holes to 
allow for instaliatton of 2 -^ 
flat machine screws. Another 
piece of PC board material, 
1-3/8" by 3/8", should be cut 
and drilled to be used as a 
shim (between the front 
panel lip and the PC material, 
which will have the switch 
mounted later). This will 
make the top of the switch 
block even with the cabinet 
cover assembly after it is 
reinstalled. 

It will be necessary to cut 
a slot with the dimensions 
5/16" by 7/8" parallel to the 
front of this cover to allow 
for activating the switches 
after the cover is reinstalled. 
Viewing this cover from the 
front of the rig, the slot 
should be located 9/1 5'* from 
the front and ^y^* from the 
right side. The next step is to 



150 



inodify the matrix board by 

drilling 8 #60 holes in the 
right end of the matrix board, 
just to the left of the DO 
through D7 markings on the 
board, making sure that they 
do not make contact wflh 
any of the conductive copper 
on the board. This will allow 
for the insertion of 8 diodes 
which will later be connected 
to a cable assembly, which 
will be connected to the 8 
slide switches. 

Mount the mini DIP 
switch to the PC board- 
Install 8 diodes with the 
anode end going through the 
new holes just drilled in the 
matrix board. Assemble a 3" 
8 wire cabte, using stranded 
wire to avoid breakage. It is 
best to use a color coded 
arrangement, as you will need 
to keep the wires in order for 
wiring into the switches. If 
coded wire is not avail able ^ it 
would be advisable to run one 
wire at a time, starting with 
diode IX) going to the right* 
hand-most switch. Continue 
in sequence until all positions 



d 



SELECTOR 



Zl 



f*lO«T --',£_ 



® 



® 



® 



TO SW POSITION 
£3 




vmt a f'OJFTiOM cip sviriTCH 



X 
X 

^ 

^ 

I 



ii 22 Zi 2Q 19 



DIOD-E MflTfllJt aOAflD 



Ftg.2. 



are wired. The next modifica- 
tion is to run a wire from the 
unused 23rd position of the 
selector switch to a common 
point of all of the 8 slide 
switches. Test for broken 
connections and solder 
bridges. Mount the matrix 
board and the switch unit 
with the necessary screws. 
A note should be made ai 



this time on the actual pro- 
gramming of the switches. 
Anyone who is familiar with 
the hexadecimal system will 
have no problem in remem- 
bering how to program the 
unit. The layout is two hex 
bytes as follows: 00 to FF, 
which you can lay out as 
8421 8421. An example: To 
program 146,55, you would 



need hex 90, or 1001 0000 in 
the switches from left to 
righL As another example, 
146,94 would equal hex AA, 
or 1010 1010 in the switches. 
After learning a couple of 
these reference frequencies, 
simply remember that each 
value of hex one equals a 
change of 15 kHz. 

Another modification that 
can be done is use the small 
version of the hex (base 16) 
thumbwheel switches and 
mount 2 of them in the cover 
near the speaker, as there is 
sufficient room at that point. 
Others have run a cable to the 
accessory plug and used an 
external switch assembly. 
You could also use the octal 
thumbwheel switches, which 
are easier to obtain, but 3 are 
needed. Some people find it 
more confusing using the 
tJLt.iI system I as it is more 
difficult to remember the fre- 
quencies. 

Any of the above provides 
for a very practical synthe* 
sized unit at a reasonable 
cost, ■ 



Robert Cowan KL71EP/1 
PO Box 214Z 
Augmta ME 04SS0 



Even in an area where 
repeaters are few and far 
between, such as Maine, it 
was easy to fill all 22 
channels of the I com 22S. 
When you start adding area 
repeater frequencies, a few 
essential simplex channels, 
and attempt to cover yourself 
for those trips to other 
locations, it is very easy to run 
out of available channels and 
wish you had "just one 
more." 

While recently pondering 
the replacement of the final 
in my tcom only two days 
out of warranty, t noticed 
that the 22 channel diode 
matrix board had positions 
for 23 channels. On closer 
inspection it became apparent 
that ihe 23rd channel on the 
matrix board was not a 
mistake, but a bona frde 
operable set of holes which I 
could program to get that 



The Missing Length 



- phantom IC-22S channel 



extra channel. 

There was no wire con- 
nected to the 23rd position 
on the matrix, so I quickly 
scrutinized the rotary channel 
selector and found that one 
pin following channel 22 was 
empty. At this point it 
crossed my mind that this 
could be a trap — there must 
have been some reason why 
Icom did not wire in the 23rd 
channel, and I was over- 
looking something very 



obvious. I have been known 
to do that once or twice. 
Thinking that the unused 
connection might be 
grounded or in some other 
way be unusable, I checked 
the unused pin and several 
other connection points for 
anything that looked the least 
bit unusual. Nothing found. 
Finally throwing caution 
to the wind and dedicated to 
making some mistake^ I ran a 
small gauge wire from the 



23rd row on the diode matrix 
to the empty pin on the 
rotary switch. Success! Now, 
when I select the dot fol- 
lowing channel 22, I have 
access to yet another essential 
frequency* Frankly, I have no 
idea why Icom deleted 
channel 23 when building the 
22S, but as long as I am able 
to expand my capabilities, 
Tm happy. 

Now, if I had just one 
more channel , * . ■ 



151 



7S Magazine Staff 




Desi 



Circuit 





ner! 



-- with special plug-in boards 



Many amateurs are 
aware by now of the 
component plug- in boards 
that allow the test assembly 
of a circuit without soldering. 
These boards are produced by 
a number of manufacturers 
and utilized as the heart of 
various "circuit designer" 
pieces of equipment. 

This article describes the 
use of such boards in a cir- 
cuitry "test bed" configura- 
tion that is particularly well- 
suited to use by radio aina- 
teurs. The test bed contains 
many features found in the 
more elaborate, and expen- 
slve, ^'circuit designer'* pieces 
of equipment- But the cost 
can be kept low, with the 
main cost being that only for 
the main plug-in component 
boards. Also, some measure- 



ments were made on the 
boards which might be of 
interest to amateurs who 
want to experiment with rf as 
well as with audio circuits. 

For those not acquainted 
with the plug-in boards, their 
basic makeup is shown in Fig, 
1 - Two basic boards are avail- 
able — a circuit socket board 
and a bus strip board. Both 
come in various lengths* The 
circuit board has five tie 
points, which are all inter- 
connected vertically on either 
side of a gap in the middle of 
the board. The gap is spaced 
so an IC or transistor can 
straddle it and plug directly 
into the board* The bus strip 
boards have two rows of 
interconnected tie points run- 
ning horizontally, but 
grouped in clusters of 5 tie 
points each* One can, if 
desired p break the intercon- 
nection of the groups of 5 tie 
points running horizontally 
so as to produce 4 rows of tie 
points. Or, one can isolate 
one or more clusters of tie 
points and permanently con- 
nect them to in put /output 
devices. Other components 
such as resistors and capaci- 
tors plug directly into the 
boards, and interconnections 
are made with #22 hookup 
wire plugged into the boards. 



Fig. L This drawing shows how the internal metal binding 
strips are used to interconnect the component plug-in tie 
points on a bus strip (a) and a circuit socl^et (b). 



m 






nil so B 

^ 




W 



SS 

El El E la 

131 P El @ iH 



!/ 





Complete^ rather elaborate 
radio receivers have been 
test- built using enough of 
these boards, but for the 
average amateur who builds a 
multiple Iransistor/IC ampli- 
fier, keyer, filter, speech pro- 
cessing device, etc., 3 boards 
only will suffice* The boards 
used in the example for this 
article are the Continental 
Specialties QT'595 circuit 
board, which is 614 inches 
long and sells for $12.50, and 
two matching QT'59B bus 
strips, which sell for $2,50 
each* 

The boards are placed on 
top and towards one side of a 
7*Vx ir*x 2" chassis. There 
is about 5/16" spacing 
between the circuit boards 
and the bus strips, but this is 
just an arbitrary spacing. The 
rest of the chassis has 
mounted on it various con- 
nectors for input/output con- 
nections, power supplies for 
linear and TTL ICs, metering 
provisions, and a built-in 

loudspeaker. Also, room has 
been left to the left of the 
circuit board to include a 
built-in rf or af signal gen- 
erator for a really complete 
"circuit designer" configura- 
tion. 

By carefully examining the 
arrangement shown in Fig. % 
one can envision how the 
various terminal posts and 
connectors are arranged* This 



arrangement is a matter of 
personal preference, of 

course, but the an^angement 
shown has proved to be very 
convenient Basically, two 
input and two output BNC 
sockets are usedj^ and wired to 
binding posts near the circuit 
board. Two grounding bind- 
ing posts are on either side of 
the circuit board near the 
lower bus strip. The -V bind- 
ing post is centered below the 
lower bus strip. The two 
meter binding posts are to the 
left of the meter, and next to 
ihem are two more posts — 
one for a fixed +5 volt output 
and the other for the +V 
output. PL-59 type jacks are 
associated with the loudr 
speaker and with one input 
binding posi for the quick 
connection of microphones 
and headphones using PL-59 
plugs. 

Three power supplies are 
available in the unit, but only 
one transformer, a 24 volt CT 
unit, is used. The 5 volt 
supply is regulated with an 
LM309K. The +V and -V 

supplies are regulated by 
zener diodes in a co nven* 
lional regulator circuit. Either 
±6 or ±1 2 volt outputs can be 
switch-set ected. All the com- 
ponents for the power 
supply, except the trans- 
former, are assembled on a 
piece of perforated board 
stock and mounted in any 
convenient location inside the 
chassis. 

The circuit and bus strip 
boards come with a paper 
backing- If this is removed, 
one can readily see, for 
instance, how the tie points 
are interconnected on the bus 
strips and how they may be 
further broken down if 
desired. Since the circuit 
board would be used for rf 
circuit testing, it was thought 
best to better insulate the 
boards from the chassis. If 
available, the best thing 
would be to replace the paper 
backing with teflon tape. But 
embossing tape of the Dymo 
variety will also work fine* 

Audio circuits and digital 
circuits can be pretty well 
"wired up" (that is, plugged 
into the circuit), as shown on 



152 



a schematic. The bus strip 

boards are used to run the 
ground, +Vp and -V lines 
around the top and bottom 
of the circuit board, Rf 
circuits require a little more 
care in layout, since one must 
keep in mind the stray capacf- 
tances that exist around the 
boards. Bypassing can also be 
a problem, since it must be 
made with leads as short as 
possible to be effective. As 
regards stray capacitances^ 
measurements showed the 
average insulated binding post 
will show about 7 pF to 
ground. A bus strip run (10 
of the 5 clustered tie points) 
will show about 20 pF to 
ground- One of the 5 vertical 
tie points (on either side of 
the center channel of the 
circuit board) will show 2-3 
pF to ground. Parallel run- 
ning tie point clusters on the 
circuit board show about 2 
pF between them. All these 
values are not too bad and 
can be lived with for many 
HF circuits, although VHF 
circuits would generally be 
impossible to lay out. A 



greater problem with rf 
circuits is good bypassing. 
The solution to this might lie 
with placing a number of 
miniature ground lugs in the 
space between the bus strips 
and circuit board, and placing 
bypass capacitors between 
the circuit board tie points 
and the ground lugs as neces- 
sary for any given circuit. 

Two banana plug sockets 
are installed below the lower 
bus strip on either side of the 
-V terminal* These are for the 
mounting of a plug in the 
front paneL The panel is not 
shown, but it is just a flat 
piece of aluminum stock 
drilled/punched randomly 
with cutouts to accommodate 
switches and potentiometers 
of various sizes. 

In any case, for someone 
who tikes to do any sort of 
circuit experimenting^ the 
plug-in boards are highly 
recommended. Parts can be 
reused many times and one 
avoids those soldered-up^ 
three dimensional, experi- 
mental lash-ups which look 
like modern art gone astray, ■ 



fifiQoa 



t. 



♦5V 



^rsoiA 



r 




BUS STRIP 



IT 




/Tf 



BUS STfitP 



n 




I I"" 








Fig, 2 Arrangement of the binding posts around the 
boards and the triple x^ttage power supply. The zeners 
uo/t types. By shorting out the lower zener^ a selectable 
of ±6 or ±12 mlts Is obtained. 



plug-in 
are 6,2 
output 



H^nk Olson W6GXN 

Box 339 

MenioPark CA 94025 



A Sim pie over voltage pro- 
tection circuit can be 

built to not only protect a 
milliammeter (used as a volt- 
meter with a series resistor), 
but also provide a visual indi- 
cation of the fact that the 
meter is in the "off scale^' 
region. 

For normal operation, Zl 
(a 10 volt zener) has less than 
10 volts across it, and R1 and 
R2 {in series) simply function 
as a 20 volt meter multiplier 
for the 0-1 mA meter When 
El gets to 20 volts, Zl 
conducts and turns on Q1, 
which draws current through 
R3 and tfie LED, The LED 
gives a visual indication of the 
overvoltage condition. 

The zener Zl is one of a 
series of Motorola diodes that 
have parttculariy sharp knees 
at low current Other zeners 



will work, of course, but the 
demarcation between 

"normal" and "overvoltage" 
will be less well defined. The 

values of Rl, R2, R3 and the 
breakdown voltage of Zl may 
be changed to suit one*s 
particular voltage range. ■ 



El 
0-30V 



to 



'4 



tN4l04 



> 




UT-Z 



01 




/77 



Sensitive 
Meters 

Saved 



Fig. J. 



153 



73 Magazine Staff 




Big Bust 
Amarillo 



-- bootlegger nabbed! 



DO not pass '*G0." Do 
not collect $200. In 
fact, Jim Krueger, go directly 
to jail. 

It may sound like a game 
of Monopoly, but, in 
Amarillo, Texas, it was more 
like cops and robbers on July 
7, 1977, Four hams nailed 
James Krueger, infamous 
haunter of repeaters and 
county jails from coast to 
coast Krueger, known by 
more than a dozen different 
aliases and a number of boot- 
legged or "borrowed" calls, is 
now held on a federal charge, 
without bond, in the Potter 
County Jailj as a result of the 
actions of joe Bcthancourt 
WA7TUM/5, his wife, Mary 
Alice, )im Wilhite W5RXC, 
Scott McDowell WB5JJN, Joe 
Cowen WA5TUM, and his 
fiancee, Malinda Lyies* 

Cowen, president of the 
Amarillo Repeater Society, 
and McDowell J repeater 
trustee, along with society 
technical committee heads^ 
Wilhite and Bcthancourt, had 
been on Krueger 's trail at 
various times since he first 
appeared in the Amarillo area 
a year ago* Then he was using 
a legitimate call, WB9MRA, 
which he **stole" from a duly 
licensed Indiana ham. 



But three weeks of bogus 
operation in June and July 
using a nonexistent call, 
WD7AAB, finally led to his 
arrest It had been a game of 
hide and seek with OF loops, 
but quick- triggered Krueger 
was always on the move and 
kept his transmissions short. 
Most Amarillo amateurs 
played the game of chatting 
with Krueger, knowing alt 
along that the committee of 
four was out chasing him. 

Hams had first become 
suspicious of Krueger a year 
ago because of his un- 
orthodox repeater habits — 
^'WB9MRA, requests the 
patch'* — at which time he 
would key up the touchtone 
autopatch access. 

His old, white school bus, 
laden with CB slogans, 
antennas, and advertising for 
CB repair, was seen by Cowen 
last yearj before it was known 
that he was illegally using 
another amateur's call. But 
Krueger became wise to the 
Situation and disappeared last 
summer, before he could be 
apprehended. 

During summer months, 
Krueger travels Interstate 40, 
working truck stops. This 
year he was recognized, by 



the unmistakable Indiana 
twang of his voice and his 
well-known repeater habits, 
even though he was using the 
new call. One cail to the FCC 
established that it was a fic- 
titious set of numbers and 
letter. WD7AAB just didn't 
exist, A vehicle similar to his 
was spotted briefly by 
another local ham, John Gif- 
ford W5SYB, who im- 
mediately contacted Cowen. 
Cowen later saw the bus in 
the parking lot of a movie 
theater in Amarillo. 

'*l had gone to see 'Star 
Wars,' but I never made it/* 
he said. Cowen and his 
fiancee, Malinda^ saw a crowd 
in front of the theater 
and learned a projector had 
broken and was being re- 
paired, 

*'That discouraged us," he 
said, *'and I started to drive 
away, and Malinda saw the 
bus," It was vacant and 
parked. But, it was the same 
bos driven in Amarillo last 
year by Krueger, 

Cowen called the other 
three hams, by telephone, 
from a nearby store, knowing 
that Krueger carried a pocket 
scanner> McDowell, a dis- 
patcher for the Texas Depart- 
ment of Public Safety, put 



local highway patrolmen on 

standby, and joined the stake- 
out crew — Cowen, Bethan- 
court, Wilhite, Miss Lyies, 
and three vehicles fitted with 
UHF gear on a. commercial 
frequency for coordination 
without detection. 

The stakeout started at 
6:50 pm, and, finally at 
about 10:45 pm, Krueger 
came out of the theater and 
entered the bus. Before his 
exit, the hams, knowing from 
past experience that the bus 
had equipment to monitor 2 
meter and law enforcement 
frequencies, had set up a 
com muni cations system using 
Bet banco urt's wife, Mary 
Alice, who was at home. 

"We used the UHF gear to 
communicate with Mary 
Alice," Cowen said. *Then 
she'd taJk to DPS holding on 
an open phone line." 

Officers then made 
arrangements to stop the bus 
on Interstate 40^ after it was 
trailed in James Bond fashion 
throughout the city by the 
four hams coordinating 
through Mrs, Bethancourt, 

"We were just plain 
lucky," Cowen said, **that it 
turned out that Krueger was 
wanted by the FBI for un- 
lawful flight to avoid prosecu- 
tion, a fact that could not be 
confirmed until officers had 
learned his date of birth from 
the 'driver's license check 
stop' made by the highway 
patrolman. 

"We knew that he was 
arrested in Indiana last year 
and jailed for dealing in 
stolen CB equipment," 
Cowen added, "and this year 
we gpt highway patrol co- 
operation because the regisr 
traiion tag on the bus did not 
fit the vehicle, according to 
information Scott McDoweil 
was able to get out of 
Arizona, its state of registry/* 

Because of the mismatch 
of license tag to bus, Texas 
troopers had "just cause" to 
stop the thing and investigate. 

"We hoped that some of 
the CB radios, or perhaps the 
I com 2 meter gear he was 
using, would turn out to be 
Stolen," Cowen said. **We had 



154 



tried last year and this year to 
get the FCC Field Enforce* 
ment Team tnterested. It 
seems that they could not 
have cared less, and we knew 
if we were to get Krueger off 
the air, it would have to be 
done on other charges, due to 
the lack of interest demon- 
strated by the FCC and the 
American Radio Relay 
League. 

"[ wrote the ARRL and 
the FCC last year about 
Krueger, and so did the legiti- 
mate holder of WB9MRA. As 

far as I know^ neither of us 
even got an answer. 1 know I 
didn't/* emphasized Cowen. 

* ' Howe ver/' Co wen 
stressed, '*l think we may gel 
some action this year from 

the FCC, for I hand-carried a 
written request to the FCC to 
investigate the situation to 
Texas Congressman Jack 
Hightower. We have tape re- 
corded evidence against 
Krueger, and, by his own 
admission to the highway 
patrolman who stopped him 
and asked to see his amateur 
radio license, we know he is 
not a ham. 

"Even the FBI has egg on 

its face after this deal," 
Cowen added. *'Scott 
McDowell also phoned the 
local FBI Resident Agent to 
tefl him that we were staking 
out Krueger, because he was 
jn violation of federal law due 
to his illegal amateur radio 
operation. That agent didn't 
have much to say when he 
was phoned again later the 
same evening by Scoti to 
inform him that he should 




Ham hunters who naUed bootlegging operator James Krueger are (left to right) joe Cowen 
WASTUMf Mafinda Lytes^ Mary A/ice Bethancourt, and Joe Bethancourt WA7TUM/5, Kneeling 
are (left) Jim Wit hire W5RXC and (right) Scott McDowell WB5JJN. Hams and two of their 
ladies are shown around a Dodge Ramcharger^ one of the vehicles used to track the bootlegger, 
who Is now in Jail awaiting federal prosecution. 



appear at the Amariilo DPS 
office to pick up his prisoner. 
The agent was completely un- 
interested in Krueger when 
we wanted him for violation 
of communication laws, but 
his interest picked up some- 
what when he learned that we 
apprehended a fugitive under 
federal warrant/' 

"Some of the radios in the 
bus have had serial numbers 
ground off, and it is my 
understanding that checks are 
being made on all confiscated 



equipment,** Cowen said. 

'*We realize that Amariilo 
is a long haul from the 
nearest FCC office/^ he 
added, *^but we feel that this 
case warrants further investi- 
gation, so hams will never 
again be bothered by James 
Krueger, We know the FCC is 
on our side, but at some 
point it is necessary to either 
enforce the rules we have or 
forget them altogether. If we 
forget them, however, then 
we have lost amateur radio to 



the nKjney-hungry EIA, with 
its lucrative CB industry, and 
the amateur frequencies will 
rot away to the tripe now 
found on 11 meters, 1 hate to 
see this happen, but we hams 
are powerless, it seems, to 
legally enforce the rules, and, 
without the FCC*s help, we 
are completely vulnerable to 
any CB freak who has the 
bread to buy a radio. If 
Krueger had not been wanted 
on other charges, Tm afraid 
he'd stilt be on 2 meters-"" 



MlroiMlaGk 

hasR! 



Amateur Headquarters for the Northeast 



iDlSdlRlO/aEK 



Ra 
Supply 

185-191 West Mam Street • PO Box 88 
Amsterdam N Y 1201D Tel. fSIB) 842-8350 
Just 5 minutes Ifom N.Y, Thru way — Exit 27 



155 



WaJdo T. Boyd K6DZY 
PO Box 36 
GeyserviUe CA 9S441 



Right Way, 

Wrong Way, 

Navy Way 



--or the 73 way 



Learning the code can be 
approached in a sys- 
tematic and rewarding way. 
Like the title suggests, there 
is a right way to go about it 
and there is a wrong way. 
And when you are finished 
arguing about these, there's 
the Navy way- 

As for my credentials, I 
attended the Ndval Radio 
Communications School 
some years ago, and there in 
the short period of three 
months became a "SS-word- 
per-minute man," Subse- 
quently, on board ship and 
with a year of radio watches 
behind me, I copied "px** 
(press wireless) with ease at 
50 wpm white covering the 
International Calling Fre- 
quency with the other ear 
No one, of course, writes 
with a stick (pencil) at that 
speed. We learned to copy the 
code directly onto a type- 
writer with a special tele- 

156 



graphic keyboard with almost 
identical upper and lower 
cases. 

There are other ways of 
communicating intelligence 
by code, ! learned land line 
telegraphy and blinking light 
as well. Land line takes a 
somewhat different code, the 
true Morse code^ which is an 
alphanumerical setup, with 
five clicks for a *'p'* and 
spaces between the elements 
of a few characters. It is 
received with a sounder, a 
clicker instead of the beeper 
that hams are familiar with. 
Another code method is ma- 
chine tracing of the impulses 
on a strip of paper (either by 
offset or broken trace) and 
then sight reading the result 
like an old 1929 Wall Street 
tycoon with his ticker tape. 

The ham type code is 
known as the International 
Morse alphabet, adapted from 
the true Morse, the better to 



hear the beeping sounds from 
a radio receiver with. 

Some persons have a 
knack for the code, like a 
drummer has rhythm. Others 
will never learn it, like some 
people can't carry a tune in a 
satchel. There is a psycholog'- 
cal synapse in the brain that 
can distinguish the difference 
between a short beep and a 
longer beep, which we shall 
henceforth call *'dit" and 
**dah," respectively. Some 
people's heredity simply did 
not include the required syn- 
apse, and to these a dit is 
exactly as long as a dah and 
spaces between do not exist. 
The good code man finds this 
hard to believe, because code 
comes so easily for him, but 
the poor guy whom nature 
forgot can well believe it. 
More about this aspiring ham 
later. 

The Navy taught its opera* 
tors to send with a hand key. 
"Bu^" were verboten until 



we could handle 18 wpm 

with the hand key with ease. 
We had to take a test before a 
gimlet eyed old shipboard op- 
erator before we got our "bug 
ticket," The test was first on 
our hand-key sending ability 
and, secondly, on our ease 
and familiarity with the 
semi-automatic T. L. McElroy 
Vibroplex, the bug. There 
was good reason for all this 
caution - listen to any code 
ham band, and you'll see 
why. The lives of many good 
men depended on the accura- 
cy of sending and receiving 
the code on board ship. There 
was no phone wireless at one 
time^ remember? And even 
when it first came into ship- 
board use, phone was far 
from dependable. Navy oper- 
ators were taught to send 
clearly, at a speed no greater 
than could be received by the 
operator at the other end. 
Demerit points were accumu- 
lated for repeating portions 
of messages J for corrections, 
etc. The idea was to send so 
clearly and distinctly that the 
receiving operator got a per- 
fect message the first lime* 

When I took my ham ex- 
am, some years after leaving 
the Navy; I petitioned the 
FCC examiner to use the 
typewriter instead of a pencil 
for receiving. He, though sur- 
prised and not quite sure the 
regulations permitted, agreed. 
He had a code sending ma- 
chine that he used for making 
the test as fair as possible 
which he could set at any 
speed up to umpteen wpm. 
After I had done the required 
minimum speed test with ob- 
vious ease and accuracy, he 
asked me if Vd care to boost 
the rate. He advanced the 
speed about 10 wpm each 
minute, and at 55 wpm I 
began to make errors and to 
falter. That was the first time 
I knew with accuracy, after 
all my years of shipboard 
operating, just what my code 
ceiling was. Needless to say, I 
passed my ham ticket code 
exam the first time and, later, 
the ARRL 35 wpm certificate 
as well, thanks to Uncle 
Sam's Navy. I mention this 
for good reason. 



There is an aspect of learn- 
ing to send and receive the 
code that resembles a stairway 
landing: plateaus. You begin 
with individual characters and 
advance to recognition of 
character combinations. This 
recognition is at first a con* 
scious act. You strive to make 
sense from the sounds and 
silenceSp and suddenly sense 
comes through. Instead of 
**dit dah stands for A," you 
suddenly recognize that '*dit 
dah fs AJ* There is a very 
important difference here, 
make no mistake about iti 
Then when you drop tiie **is" 
and dit dah becomes A in 
truth witht'n your conscious- 
ness, you have ceased to 
translate, and are "thinking in 
code." That's important! It's 
the whole ball of wax, 

I don't mean to make it all 
sound easy- Learning the 
code takes a lot of appli- 
cation of the seat of the pants 
to the chair, hard work and 
perseverance* You are learn- 
tng a new language, just as 
surely as though you were 
studying Spanish, German, or 
Parsi, If you would study ihe 
science of communicationp 
try Norbert Weiner's Cyber- 
netics. You'll come out a 
better all around ham for 
having tackled it. 

I contend that most of the 
trouble people have learning 
to send and receive code is 
with the teacher, yourself in- 
cluded when self-taught. Vital 
to your success is a positive 
mental attitude. One of the 
first mistakes every teacher 
makes is to teach you the 
code alphabet* Don't do it! 
At feast, don't do it that way. 

Get hold of a first grade 
reader and start at page one, 
letter one, word one* Each 
letter you don*t know the 
Morse character for, look it 
up on a handy chart, and 
convert it to the phonetic: 
"B" = dah dit dit dit. Say it 
out ioud: dah dit dit dit. Hear 
it Send it on your hand key 
{stay away from semi auto- 
matics and automatics until 
you can send fast and com- 
fortably well with the hand 
key.) Do not, ever, say: dash 
dot dot dot. That is not what 



you hear coming out of the 
speaker* You are learning to 
recognize code by sound, not 

sight (at this paint at any 
rate)* 

By taking the letters as 
they come in a child's reader, 
you will be learning the code 
as it was meant to be learned 
by the inventor who was a 
much smarter man that he is 
generally given credit for. 
Note that the most frequent- 
ly used letter in the English 
alphabet is "E". Note its 
counterpart in Morse: dit 
YeS| he did take frequency of 
letters into consideration, and 
the Internationai Morse im- 
proved upon this somewhat 
And that's the way you 
should learn to recognize the 
Morse language^ most fre- 
quently used letters first. You 
won't have to worry about 
how often you have to refer 
to the code chart — your 
natural laziness will soon 
commit the letters and their 
Morse counterparts to mem- 
ory rather than go through 
the extra work of referring to 
the chart each time! It will 
come surprisingly naturally if 
you simply do it the Navy 
Way! 

Now as you become better 
and better acquainted with 
the sounds, and the sounds 
become the letters, a point 
will be reached when you will 
suddenly find yourself recog- 
nizing two and three letter 
combinations. They will 
sound like a new Morse char- 
acter that isn't in the alpha- 
bet: dah, ditty ditty, dit: the. 
The silences will take their 
places in the character if you 
are being careful not to slur 
in your sending and are mak- 
ing each character distinctly 
and with its spaces where 
they are intended and the 
length they are intended to 
have. You will be developing 
your ear, and you will be 
walking on the second pla- 
teau before you even realize 
it was a struggle to get there! 

So you keep on going, 
andt after you have gone 
completely through the prim- 
er reader, do it again and then 
a third time. Now you will 
probably be ready to take on 



a standard book, lay a radio 
theory handbookj or a page 
of 73 Magazine. Don't skip 
over the numerals. YouVe got 
to learn them now, and they 
are no more difficult than the 
letters. Do them the same 
way, by referring to the chart 
when you hit one you don*t 
quite remember. Get with it 
and before long you will rec- 
ognize a series of two and 
three letter words ail as one 
character! You will have 
reached the leading edge of 
the third plateau. Keep push- 
ing, keep practicing, and 
you'll be walking on third 
level with ease before you 
realize it was a tough nut to 
crack. When you do, you'll be 
receiving 15 wpm or better! 

After that it's practice, 
practice, practice- There's an- 
other plateau at about 25 
wpm, and another around 35 
to 40. Once these humps are 
cleared and become comfort* 
able, copying behind begins 
to sneak up on you, and your 
elation will know no bounds. 
Your code will have become a 
second language, just as sure- 
ly as Hindi, Chinese or Rus- 
sian, I once shared the radio 
shack with a guy who copied 
from 20 to 30 words behind! 
You can't possibly keep up 
with individual characters at 
that speed. The reason has to 
do with learning to type and 
its distinctive plateaus, word- 
combinations, etc. 

There is a way of sending 
Morse with a hand key that is 
unbeatable for clarity and 
ease. You can send all day 
without getting tired if you 
will learn this method from 
the beginning: Raise your 
wrist slightly wiih each down- 
ward motion of the hand on 
the key, like Liberace on the 
piano only not quite so car- 
ried away. Don'i grasp the 
key with a death grip; treat it 
reverently, lightly, caressing: 
ly. That way your muscles 
will remain almost relaxed. 
(Yes, I know that raising your 
wrist feels absolutely wrong 
at first But persevere, and 
you'll never regret it,) 

!t takes a lot of hard work 
and determination to master 
the code, but I am certain 



that too many potentially 
good hams make a hard, hard, 
bitter job out of it when 
really it's not that hard at all 
It's simply a matter of start- 
ing out on the right foot — 
wups! Careful! You'll be ac- 
cused soon enou^ of sending 
with your left foot! 

And when you've been at 
it for a few years, and the 
birds and bedsprings begin 
talking to you in Morse, it's 
time for a vacation into the 
phone bands! Many a crack 
Navy op ended his radio ca- 
reer in a padded cell — there's 
a certain hazard attached to 
daily, year in and year out 
high speed code work. 

What*s tops in speed? Well, 
there's another little quirk of 
the human grey matter that 
blends a rhythm into a solid 
roar above a certain thresh- 
old. Even the best signalman 
begins to lose his differentia- 
tion of blinking li^ts at 
about 12 to 15 wpm. If he 
didn't he'd never be able to 
appreciate the movies or tele* 
vision. Same thing with code 
by ear. After some level 
around 50 to 75 wpm, indi- 
viduals will find it's time to 
let the computer handle it. 

There are dozens of little 
hints and kinks that can be 
passed along by old radio ops. 
For instance^ youVe got to 
push yourself to copy at a 
speed faster than is comfort- 
able for you at any given time 
in your learning period. If 
you don't, you'll top out at a 
very low speed. It also means 
that you have to expect to 
make errors. Don't sweat it; 
let the errors fall where they 
may as you are climbing the 
speed ladder* When you have 
reached the level beyond 
which you don't feel the ef- 
fort is worth the use to which 
you'll put the ability gained 
thereby, settle down at that 
speed and begin to perfect 
your accuracy. Keep away 
from swinging your sending. 
Another hint - if you make a 
mistake, don't go back over 
iL Keep on going with what 
you are copying. Trying to 
correct an error only causes 
you to miss what's coming. 
After you have learned to 



157 



copy behind the signal, 
there's plenty of time to cor- 
rect minor errors. 

Another hint — team to 
receive on a typewriter, right 
from the beginning. There's a 
much better linkup between 
the code, your brain j and a 
typewriter key than between 
the brain and a pencil. 

And after all thiSi if you 
try and try and pretty soon 
six months rolls around (at 2 
hours a day) and you haven't 
passed 5 wpm, ask for help 
from a psychologist. It's just 



possible you are one of the 
unfortunate few whose syn- 
apses never quite got together 
for thai particular mental 
function. Then do some letter 
writing. Petition the FCC to 
let such bona fide proven-by- 
a-psychologist handicapped 
persons pass the test by read- 
ing written dot dashes 
from a moving tape. Because, 
chances are, even though you 
can*t hear the difference in 
character lengths, if you are 
sifted you can learn to read 
the difference as fast as you 



and I can read this printed 
page! Having known guys 
who could, whose job was to 
handle the automatic code 
printer In the radio shack^ Td 
say we have reached a point 
in our ham evolution where 
there's room for this particu- 
lar exception. 

Therefore, let nothing you 
dismay. You, too, can learn 
the code. As long as the 
majority of hams persist In 
maintaining the code test re- 
quirement for licensing, go 
along with them and show 



them youVe got what it takes 
to pass their silly old test. 
And who knows, maybe it*s 
not so silly after all? Suppose, 
for instance, you were sud- 
denly stranded on a desert 
island, and all you had lo 
signal for help with was a 
simple, keyed transistor oscil- 
lator you whipped together 
out of a pocket radio? Once 
you learn the code, you'll be 
surprised at how much fun 
you can have with it, and, at 
infrequent times, how vaf- 
uabfe it is to you! ■ 



Joyce F. Holland WA4WZL 
HiwsES&e College 
MadisonviUe TH 37354 



Living With 



the Family Ham 



-- planning births, etc. 



In many situations a ham 
marries a no n- ham. Realiz- 
ing thai I here is a scarcity of 

information available on how 
to cope as a non-ham in a 
ham worid, I have compiled 

the following information 
dedicated to greater harmony 
in the lives of hams and their 
spouses. 

1- Do le*trn the radio vocabu- 
lary. 

— PTT and CW are not real 
estate agencies* 

— XYL is not the abbrevia- 



tion for xylophone, 

- 73s and 88s are not just 
lock combinations. 

— DX is not just a brand of 
gasoline* 

2. Remain calm while as 
many as 5 antennas are in- 
stalled on the roof. Describ- 
ing to a stranger that you live 
in the house with 5 antennas 
leaves less chance for mis- 
understanding than describing 
a house with blue shutters, 

3, Don't panic when the 
utility room gets transformed 



into a ham shack. 

4. Plan to serve meals at 
limes that do not interfere 
with radio nets* 

5. If possible, try to schedule 
the birth of children in mid- 
week so as not to interfere 
with hamfests, 

6. Don't get upset if your 
spouse cannot coordinate 2 
articles of clothing in the 
closet, but he is able to spot a 
new transceiver in a store 
window from across the 
street. 



7. Don't get alarmed if the 
side is cut out of the broom 
closet to make way for a 
transceiver installation. 

8. Even if they do just look 
like funny post cards to you, 
do not throw away QSL 
cards. 

9. Do your homework. 
Have ready for curious 
friends and grocery bag boys 
at a moment *s notice clear 
and logical answers to the 
following questions: 

a. Why do you have those 

funny license plates on 

your car? 

b- What kind of CB is 

that? 

c. Can you hear police 
calls on that? 

d. How far away can you 
talk to people? 

e. Can you talk to my 
friend in Guatemala {or 
Peru, or Liberia, etc.}? 

10. Learn to reassure the 
neighbors when they ask if 
being a MARS member means 
you report the activities of 
the nei^bors to the FBI. 

11. If possible, study radio 
code and theory for your 
own license. Never under any 
circumstances comment that 
the code sounds to you like a 
confused woodpecker. 

12. Relax and enjoy the 

benefits of your spouse's 
hobby. It does, after all, keep 
him (or her) home much 
more and is usually less dan- 
gerous than auto racing or 
scuba diving. 

After almost 6 years of 
marriage to a ham, I took the 
lest. In October, 1976, I was 
licensed as WA4WZL. ■ 



158 



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Add Jazz To Your Tempo 



- - with a few simple mods 



Ronald R. Gro^ans WBSZBJ 
PO Box 121 
NUes Mt 49120 





^bE. 



Microphom with dip in staffed. 



I have been an amateur 
radio operator for about a 
year and have had to start on 
a financial shoestring. My 
first piece of equipment was a 
Tennpo fnnh HT. As my only 
means of communicating 
with my fellow hams, the HT 
went a lot of places with me. 
I soon discovered that the 
handie-talkie was not so 
handy as It was on the road- I 
tried hooking a carrying strap 
to the two provided eyelets, 
and this, too, proved unsat- 
isfactory. I then put on my 
thinking cap in earnest. 

I knew Motorola made a 
wide variety of HTs. 1 dug 

out my Motorola wish book 
(commonty called a catalog) 
and started my search for a 
better means of carrying my 
HI, 

I discovered that there 
were two ways available to 
carry an HT in comfort One 
\^y was by means of a case 
which attached lo the belt. 
To use the HT one simply 
lifted it out of the case. 
Second was by means of a 
belt clip, the belt clip being 
permanently affixed to the 
unit. This second method 1 
liked for two reasons; one, it 
was more secure, and, two, it 
turned out to be less 
expensive- 



Having solved the problem 
of how to carry my HT, I 
started to work on the idea of 
a hand- held microphone 
accessory. This turned out to 
be more time-consuming than 
the belt clip. Therefore, since 
it would take time to work 
everything out on my micro- 
phone accessory, I decided to 
go ahead and put the belt clip 
on. 

1 went to a local Motorola 
parts saies and repair dealer 
and ordered what I needed. I 
placed an order for one belt 
clip, one fiber adhesive insu- 
lator, two screws, and one 
metal backing plate. The 
entire order came to a 
whopping grand total of 
$3/67. The Motorola dealer 
did not happen to have these 
parts on hand, but ordered 
them for me* I had them in 
just about a week. 

Now the hard part. I 
found a microphone with no 
problem. That w^as the easiest 
of this group of pans to find. 
I had a microphone, but I 
needed a means to connect it. 
After many long hours of 
searching, 1 settled on a con- 
nector made by ITT, A five 
piece connector system costs 
$4.88. 

After comparing the 
schematics for both the 



160 




mm 



The inside of the Tempo after modification. 



microphone and the HT, I 
discovered that the micro- 
phone switch alone would 
not handle the switching 
chores in the HT. Now here 
was a real problem. How does 
one get a manual slide switch 
to function from a remote 
hand-held microphone? 1 
instantly thuught of a relay 
operated switch. But most 
relays I had seen were way 
too big 10 fit into the limited 
space of the HT. Now I really 
had a problem, one that 
could kill this whole mod- 
ification. 

I dug into my parts 
catalogs and, after making a 
molehil! out of a mountain, I 
found iust what the doctor 
ordered, I found two Mag- 
necraft relays that would 
work perfectly- Yes, I said 
two relays, Magnecraft 
manufactures all sizes of 
relays, and these two relays 
are the size of an integrated 
circuit, one DPDT and the 



other an SPST- These two 
parts were the second most 
expensive items after the 
microphone. They cost a 
total of $20,00 but are worth 
the cost for their size aione. 

After waiting for four 
weeks for the relays and 
connectors, 1 could now go to 
the workbench. To start with, 
you need a small container to 
put the screws in. These are 
small screws and easy to lose. 
It is so hard to find a good 
screw — once you have one, 
you hate to lose it. 

The first step involved the 
removal of all case parts. 
Then, taking the top plate 
and removing the useless 
meter, I inscribed the outline 
of the connector and filed the 
hole to fit I found that ! had 
to bend the tabs down on the 
connector in order for the 
connector to fit. To secure 
the connector, I liberally 
applied a plastic cement 
(commonly used to build 





I 'J 



The Tempo fmh after modification. 



plastic models). Setting this 
aside to dry, I then went to 
work on the circuit board. 

For working on the circuit 
board you need to get out 
your surgeon's cap, gown, 
and mask as well as your 
trusty scalpeL The first step 
here was to locate both the 
B+ connections and the 



antenna switch-over. Once 
locating these, I was ready to 
start the operation. My 
assistant handed me the 
soldering iron, and we were 
off. I removed the meter 
connections first. Then, with 
the scalpel, I made an incision 
to sever the printed circuit 
between the points where the 





Parts List 








Motorola Parts 

1^4206081 
14-8 2643 E 25 

3-1 36666 
64^2043001 


clip 

insulator 
screw 
plate 


S 3.50 
S .03 

$ .04 ea. 
$ .10 


Req'd, 


2 


Magnecraft Parts 

Wt71DIP-14 
W1720IP-19 


SPST<9> 12 V 
DPDT<i) 12 V 


$ 5,00 
$14,95 


Req'd 




ITT Parts 

DE^9P 
DE^S 

DE -110963-1 




$ K48 
S 2,02 
S 1.33 


Heq'd 




Radio Shack Parts 
21-923 


microphone clip 


$ 1;29 


Req'd 




Mura Microphone 


DX-120 


$29.95 


Beq'd 





161 



antenna was switched (3 

places) and the B+ switching 
(3 places). 

Then turning the patient 
over» I inserted the DPDT 
relay on top of the existing 
slide switch with a little glue. 
I also adhered the SPST relay 
to the back of the unit's 
internal microphone. (Note: 
M the position indicators are 
hard to see once the relays 
have been gtued down, it is 
recommended that a spot of 
white paint be placed on the 
underside for easy identifi- 



cation.) 

The glue takes some hours 
to dry, so I left the patient 
under the anesthetic and 
went to the microphone. I 
soldered the wires to the 
connector and bent the tabs 
down, then put the plastic 
clip on. I was careful to write 
down which pin got which 
color wire. This done, I went 
to lunch. I returned after 
supper to finish, making the 
connection to the relays and 
the circuit boards, (Be sure 
thai shielded wire is used in 



the antenna connections.) 

Depending upon how you 
wish the unit to function, 
you may wire it so that it will 
work either with or without 
the externa! mike. However, I 
have rarely used mine 
without the externa! micro- 
phone. ! find it to be much 
more convenient with the 
microphone. If you wish only 
operation with the external 
microphone, you may omit 
the SPST relay and simply 
disconnect the internal micro- 
phone* 




I 
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Next I placecl a Realistic 
microphone holder on the 
front of the unit by just 
peeling off the adhesive 
protector and pressing the 
holder into place. One thing 
about that Realistic micro- 
phone holder is that if you 
have a touch tone pad on the 
front of your unit, you can 
put the holder on a leather 
strap and slide it on your 
bdt. 

This group of modifi- 
cations may be used on, other 
HTs as well* « 



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163 




Interested 
Television? 



-- how to get started 




Fig, L A homemade comer reflector for A TV a$ constructed 
by WB8JXF. Maximum gain with such arrays is in the order of 
10-12 dBf depending largely on the size of the reflector and its 
angle. This gain is easily realized, the antenna is simple to 
construct and match^ and the array has a wide frontal lobe 
making aiming noncriticaL These features make the corner 
reflector an ideal candidate for home construction where 
adequate facilities for precision antenna work are not avait- 
able. 



Dr R^lph E. Taggart WBBDQT 
602 S. Jefferson 
Mason MI 48SS4 

There is little doubt that 
ATV holds a fascination 
for many operators. If articles 
in the literature for the last 
few years are any indication, 
we well may be entering a 
modc^it growth phase for this 
fascinating mode. ATV, 
because of the incredibly 
wideband nature of the 
signals, is completely 
different from other modes 
with which amateurs are 
familiar, and even consider- 
able experience in VHF and 
UHF is not sufficient to 
predict the requirements for a 
useful system. Quality results 
over a given path are not 
nearly so easy to achieve as 
some might suggest Getting 
sufficiently good results to 
sustain local interest is a 
matter of being willing to 
invest a certain minimum 
amount of effort in setting up 
a quality system, and this is 
largely a matter of paying 
attention to innumerable 
details- 

WB8JXF and myself have 
devoted a considerable period 
of time to developing the 
guidelines for an ATV system 
that would provide the kind 
of performance that would 
encourage others to give the 
mode a try* Some of the 
things we have discovered run 
counter to conventional 
wisdom, as expressed in many 



articles on the subject, but we 
have taken the trouble to 
document all aspects of 
system performance. If you 
follow some of our recum- 
mendations, you can expect 
to have the same level of 
system performance. 

It is all too easy to quote 
results that can be obtained 
under particularly favorable 
conditions of location, 
terrain, or band conditions. 
Our approach has been 
extremely conservalivej for it 
is the average performance 
level that must bear the brunt 
of day-to-day operations. 
You wilt occasionally be able 
to do considerably better 
when conditions permit^ but 
our approach will be to pitch 
the system in terms of what 
you can expect in the way of 
performance whenever you 
turn the equipment onl 

If you have been thinking 
about trying ATV, why not 
read on and see what you can 
accomplish? If you are giving 
serious consideration to ATV, 
and there is no present 
activity in your area, you 
should convert at least one 
other station. A working 
operation over a reasonable 
path is usually a prerequisite 
for interesting still other 
operators. 

System requirements are 
largely related to the range 
involved in the specific path 
you wish to cover. Function- 
al ly, requirements break 
down into a few general range 
categories: 

1, Less than 5 niilub. In this 
categcry it is usually possible 
to achieve true **line of sight" 
conditions. If this is the case, 
it is possible to get by with 
low power or relatively 
simple converters or an- 
tennas* 

2: >10 miles. About 10 
Watts average power output is 
required in this category, 
assuming that quality 
antennas and converters are 
employed. If not^ still higher 
power will be needed, 
3, 1O20 miles. 10-100 Watts 
power output will be required 
for this distance, depending 
largely on the remaining 
system elements and the 



164 



terrain along the iniended 
path. 

4. 20+ miles. Regular work 
over exiended paths will 
require good antennas and 
converters and a power out- 
put of 100 to 1000 Watts 
depending upon the path. 
Even the best of stations will 
have difficulty maintaining 
quality pictures out beyond 
40 miles* 

Note particularly that 
these categories are based on 
normal band conditions. Real 
DX of up to a hundred miles 
or more will be a rare event, 
usuafty coupled with excel- 
lent band conditions. The 
quality of such long haul 
pictures is such that they are 
acceptable primarily because 
they are DX. To sustain a 
local level of ATV activity 
requires consistent coverage 
over a much smaller area with 
pictures of consistently good 
quality. The purpose of this 
article will be to describe the 
requirements for the various 
system elements to achieve 
this end. Those elements 
include the antenna system, 
the receiving converter^ the 
basic ATV exciter, high 
power options, and the 
matter of voice transmission 
along with the pictures. We 
will discuss each of these 
separately, but you should 
keep in mind that the results 
you achieve will depend on 
the quality achieved with 
each link in the system at 
both ends of the circuit. The 
pictures that arc possible over 
a given path will be critically 
dependent on the weakest 
link in your system^ and the 
gradual increase in coverage is 
largely a matter of optimizing 
each element of the total 
ATV system. 

Antennas 

The keys to success here 
are gain and bandwidth. 
Unless you just want lo work 
down the block, you should 
not consider anything less 
than 10 dB, and you should 
try for all the gain you can 
get. Yagi arrays are oul for 
ATV, primarily due to their 
limited bandwidth. 
Commercial antennas are cut 



f 




Fig, 2 The MBM48/70 antenna in use at the aathor*s QTH, This antenna exhibits 1 7.3 dBi of 
gain and is essentially flat across the entire 420-450 MHz band. The driven element and 
reflector look somewhat like a combination of a quad and skeleton slot with two conventional 
directors transitioning into a series of cross-shaped elements each of which consists of four 
half-wave elements. Despite its unusual geometry^ the antenna really performs as indicated by 
the specifications certified by the British Aerial Standards Commission and verified by our own 
tests^ Like most high gain arrays, this one is extremely sharp in terms of pattern and is 
definitely not suitable for round tables, a/though It ctmnot be beaten for long haul 
point-to-point work. 




Fig. 3, One of the modified /\4MC 432/28 converters (MMC 438/56) used in our system. The 
photograph also shows the 1/4 waue stub for channel 6 which is used to remove a spurious 
mixer product between channel 6 and 23 in our area as described In the text. The use of such 
modern crystal controlled converters results in considerably better system performance than 
can be obtained with converted UHF TV tuners and outboard preamplifiers. 



for the wrong parts of the 
band and even a home brew 
antenna cut for your 
operating frequency will 
noticeably restrict the rcsolu- 
tion of the pictures. 

The simplest antenna that 
will do a relijble job is a 
corner reflector such as the 
one illustrated in Fig. 1 , Such 
antennas are easy to 



construct/ are sufficiently 
broadband for TV use and are 
not critical to aim. About 10 
dB gain is what can be 
expected. Several commercial 
antennas are designed to 
cover the entire 420450 MHz 
band and thus can be used 
not only for TV, but for 
other modes as welL Table 1 
summarizes some of these 



antennas. The KLM models 
are well thought of in ATV 
circles, although we have not 
used them. Our favorite is the 
MBM48/70 from j. Beam of 
Great Britain* This antenna is 
flat across the entire band yet 
packs a respectable 17 dB of 
gain into quite a compact 
package. This antenna, illus- 
trated in Fig. 2 and marketed 



165 







Fig, 4, Test tmnsmission sequence from WBSJFXas received by the author using the MMC 438/56 converter Antennas are those 
illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, with 10 feet of antenna Iteight at the transmitting end and 25 feet at the receii^ing end. The pHJth is 8 
miles over rolling low hilts. Power levels are 10 Watts (AX J 5 Watts (B)^ 20 Watts (C)^ and 30 Watts (D) avenge output The 
important fact here is not the absolute power versus path length, for we have now reached the point where 5 Watts average 
power does as well over this path as 20-25 Watts in this test (by simply raising the antenna at WBSJXF's end). What is significant 
is the pronounced threshold effect for video signals. Even hS dB additional system gain (B) will produce a surprisingly good 
picture; 3 dB is even better, as Is 4.5 dB (D). Once you can see any video at alt^ a comparatively small Increase in system gain at 
any point will give you a working operation. The other side of the coin is that if you are near the thr&hold, a simitar small loss 
in system gain can ruin otherwise acceptable pictures! The proverbial '^snow^free" pictures require at least 20 dB additional gain 
above the threshold, and you are not likely to get such pictures without line of sight conditions. 



by Spectrum International, 
certainly has not received the 
attention that iL merits based 
on performance. 

Pdarizalion is completely 
noncri Ileal as long as it is 
matched at both ends of the 
circuit. You will probably be 
best off deciding between 
vertical or horizontal based 
on what other modes you 
might wish to play with on 
the band in addition to your 



TV activity, Heiglu and loca- 
tion of the antenna are prime 
factorSi however, and care 
should be excercised to insure 
minimum run of transmission 
line to the station. The 
antenna should certainly clear 
local obstructions, and height 
gain increases nicely up to 
about 50 feet. Above this the 
increase in height gain is 
usually counteracted by 
increased line losses, so super 



high antenna systems are 
really far from desirable. 

There is considerable 
mystique about transmission 
lines for VHF and UHF work 
these daySi and the feeling is 
that everyone should be using 
some form of hardline. 
Extensive measurements we 
have performed regarding 
direct line losses and system 
performance indicate that for 
runs of up to 50 feet there is 



little to be gained by going to 
the more expensive hardline. 
Use a good brand name RG-8 
type foam cable, and you will 
do just fine. This does not 
mean you should use CB type 
cables. These have low braid 
density, and the braid is 
rarely tinned or plated - 
both factors leading to 
excessive line losses. Short 
runs around the shack can be 
handled with RG-58 foam 



166 







C D 

Fig, 5, A test transmtsston sequence similar to that of Fig. 4^ except that power levels of 5 Watts (A), 10 Watts (B), 15 Watts fC), 
and 20 Watts (D) are shown. Again^ the pronounced thresho/d effect over a signal range of 3-6 dB above vlsibi/ity is clearly 
evident 



with good results up to power 
levels of 50 Watts or so. 
Higher power levels will cause 
noiiceable line heating with 
58 foam and you will have to 
go lo the larger cable sizes. 

Equally misleading are 
some of the opinions circulat- 
ing about connectors. Most 
serious UHF operators use 
type N connectors for larger 
cable sizes, dropping to BNCs 
for RG-5S cable due to the 
impedance bumps caused 
when the typical UHF series 
connectors {SO-239, PL^259) 
are used. Although such 
impedance bumps arc real^ 

they will not result in notice- 
able degradation in system 



performance if the venerable 
UHF connectors are installed 
properly. The newer solder- 
less PL-259 connectors are 
ideal for use with RG-59 
foam cables and are far less 
tedious to insuli than a BNC 



TR relays arc ^continuing 
problem- If you look at the 
astronomical cost of such 
relays these days, you would 
assume that they must 
perform. The sad fact is that 
the relays available to 



amateurs generally perform 
very poorly at this frequency 
and are a major source of lost 
power in transmitting and 
disappearing signals on 
receive. The only suitable 
route we have found is lo 



Model 


Source 


Gain 


Langth 


Price 


420-470-14 


KLM 


13JdBi 


5 feet 


$21.95 


420-450-27 


KLM 


16.7 dSi 


10 feet 


$39.95 


1:1 balun for above 


KLM 






$19.95 


MBM48/70 


Spectrum 
International 


17.3 dBi 


6.5 fpet 


$51.75 



Table h Antennas suitable for use on ATV^ Listed prices do not include postage, KLM 
Electronics is located at 17025 Laurel Romi, Morgan Hi ft CA 95037, Spectrum International is 
located at Box I084C^ Concord MA 01742, T/re KLM antennas require the listed 1:1 balun, 
while the MBM4S/70 can be fed directly with 50 Ohm cable. Staci^ed pairs or quad arrays may 
be employed for an additional 3 or 6 dB gain. KLM makes a variety of 2 and 4 port power 
dividers that vastly simplify the proper phasing and matching of larger arrays, A major 
advantage of these wideband antennas is timt they are equally effective for other modes 
anywhere in the band. 



167 



INPUT 

^ — 



f^ 






■f 



I MM 






^I 



f^CEtn'Mnu 



/77 



WTPUT 
tA**Tt 

m 



>4Tft 



'^ POT 



m 



F/"^* 6* In-line power output meter suitable for use on any 
VHF band. The coupling loop is a length of #24 enamel wire 
threaded under the shield of the braid of a length of RG-58 
foam coax. Input and output connectors may be 50-239 
bulkhead connectors but matching hoods (Amphenol S3-76S) 
should be used to minimize the Impedance anomalies at the 
connectors (see Fig, 7). Lead lengths for the terminating 
resistor (47 Ohms) and the JN34 diode should be kept to a 
minimum. The diode is bypassed using a J 000 pF feedthrou^ 
capacitor A button mica capacitor may be substituted but a 
conventional disc capacitor is unsuitable. The meter may be 
calibrated using a Bird or similar in-line wattmeter, with the 
I Ok pot used to establish the desired full scale deflection. 



shop the surplus outlets for 
military relays designed for 
US6 in the high UHF and tow 
microwave region (like about 
1 GHz), (n any case, avoid 
no V relays, as these seem to 
have a tendency toward over- 
heating coils and less than 
perfect performance. 

Converters 

A great deal of thought 
went into the subject of suit- 
able converters. The conven- 
tional approach is to use a 
padded UHF tuner, usually 
with a quality preamp to 
compensate for the poor 
sensitivity of the tuner.^ 
There are several objections 
to this approach. First of all, 
even the best of the outboard 
tuners employ passive diode 
mixers. This results in a mixer 
noise figure of 10-15 dB. A 
good preamp will have low 
noise and a gain of perhaps 
20 dB, This gain is not 
sufficient to overcome the 
mixer losses and still set the 
system noise figure. The 
result is a higher system noise 
figure and a system toss of at 
least 10 dB compared to a 
system employing a low noise 
active mixer. The preamp 
does improve things consider- 
ably but you have not 
optimized either system gain 
or noise figure. The tunable 
feature of these converters 
was useful in the old days 
when self-excited transmitters 



mtghl be operating anywhere 
in the band (or out of it on 
occasion), but is of marginal 
utility today when trans- 
mitters should be crystal 
controlled. The tunable 
converter is really only useful 
over a few megahertz if the 
preamp is peaked for maxi- 
mum performance in any 
case. You can go to a broad- 
banded preamp but ihis will 
cost in terms of both gain and 
noise figu re. 

The answer, of course, is 
to go to a conventional 
crystal controlled converter 
of the same type that would 
be employed for work at 432. 
The converter we use is man- 
ufac lured by Microwave 
Modules of Great Britain and 
is marketed in this country 
by Spectrum International 
and others* The basic 
MMC 432/28 converter is 
designed for 432 input and 
28 MHz output and costs 
$65. For an additional $20, 
SI will peak the front end to 
your video frequency, install 
a crystal to bring you out on 
any low VHF channel (we use 
channel 2), and repeak the i-f 
output circuits. Thus for $85 
you get a converter with a 6 
MHz front end, a 3,5 dB 
noise figure and a total of 25 
dB of conversion gain! This is 
cost competitive with the 
tuner-preamp approach if you 
tally up the cost of all the 
components of the latter 



J 



system, and will outperforni 
the latter in terms of botN 
system g3in and noise figurej 
Other converter manufac- 
turers (Van^ard, Janel, etc.)^ 
will do similar jobs, or you 
can build any of the modem 
conveners in the literature, 
making appropriate changes 
in the crystal frequency, LO, 
and i-f output circuits. The 
fine tuning control of the TV 
set will swing you several 
MHz, permitting the signal tq 
be centered as desired in the 
i'f passband of the TV set ' 
My own modified 
MMC 432 converter is shown 
in Fig. 3. We adopted a videoj 
frequency of 437.25 MHz foij 
a very practical reason. Mosti 
converter manufacturers offer 
432 units with 50 MHz 14 
output as an option. If 432 
comes out at 50.00 MHZj 
then 437.25 wilt come out at^ 
55.25 MHz, which just 
happens to be the videq 
carrier frequency for channel 
2! Thus a crystal for 6 meter 
output can be used, savin 
the long wait for a specia 
crystal order The only 
additional modifications to 
the converter involve a retun^ 
ing of the i-f output coil for 
55-60 MHz and repeakingthq 

front end for the video 
frequency. Spectrum Intern 
national labeled this version 
the MMC 438/56 and car| 
deliver within a few days. ! 
Fig, 3 also shows a fix for 
another kind of problem 
which you may encounter. In 
our area we have two power^ 
fill TV stations — one ort 
channel 6 (video frequency of 
83.25 MHz) and the other or^ 
channel 23 (video frequency 
of 525.25 MHz). Given our 
i-f, one of the many possil 
spurious mixer products fall: 
right in our video window.' 
Channel 6 is about 1 mild 
from WBSJXF's location] 
while channel 23 is less tha 
2 miles distant. He was face 
With a very strong spuriou 
si^al while, even thou^ 
was about 9 miles from either 
station, I had a moderately 
strong image. After far toq 
many evenings waiting fort 
one or the other station td 
sign so we coutd get on wjth 



3 



our tests, we decided to solve 
,the problem. One solution 
would be a strip-line or 
coaxial filler in the input line 
Ito the converter, but I 
decided to try a simpler solu- 
tion first A coaxial T connec* 
lor was mounted at the 
converter input with a 
quarter wavelength of coax 
(electrical length) cut for 
channel 6 on one arni, with 
the antenna lead on the 
other. This stub had no effect 
on reception at 437.25 but 
completely removed th§ 
spurious signal. WB8]XF 
tried the same trick, and it 
worked perfectly despite the 
very high signal levels at Jiis 
location. In-line filters may 
be required for some types of 
interference due to front end 
•overloading, but if one of the 
,offending components is on a 
'VHF frequency this simpler 
^approach may work equally 
fWell. 

Converted TV tuners do 
have one major use — they 
jare so insensitive (without a 
preamp) thai they let you 
monitor your picture when 
operating at moderately high 
ipower levels. Simply pad 
down the LO in the UHF 
[tuner of your set, and you 
will have that capability. 
iDirect monitoring with the 
^high performance converter is 
jnot really feasible as tt will 
• overload with outputs over a 
few Watts. 

Another factor worth 
mentioning is the TV set used 
as the i'f. It makes little sense 
to use a junker from the back 
room of the local service 
shops when modern sensitive 
sets are available for so little. 
If yoL! get one with a power 
transformer (not a hot 
chassis), it can even be con- 
verted for use as a video 
monitor. I use a Sony TV-770 
with excellent results 
($139.95 at a discount store), 
but many other types are 
suitable and cost even less, 

ATV Power Levels 

I Before discussing specific 
transmitter options we should 

'have a realistic chat about 
power. The power require- 
ments for ATV are directly 



168 



related to the path yoU 
intend to cover. The wide^ 
band nature of TV, coupled 
with I he performance of rf 
amps and the age threshold o^ 
the TV set, results in a very 
pronounced threshofd effect? 
over any given path. Over M 
distaoce of op to a fev^ miles 
a low powered transmitter 
{@ 1 Watt) will yield accept- 
able results provided line of 
sight conditions exist. The 
latter condition is increas^ 
ingly unlikely as the path ii 
stretched out^ and it ii 
amazing how fast the vided 
signal disappears despite thej 
fact that QRP voice commu* 
nication is possible over th^ 
same path. 

Power output is a difficult 
question to address in the 
case of TV since there are 
several reference levels that 
can be used^ including peak 
power, black leveh and 
average power output level. 
Peak power is equivalent to 
the power output of a proper- 
ly set up transmitter- 
modulator combination 
during sync pulse intervals. 
An in-line wattmeter such as 
a Bird will measure peak 
power only when the camera 
is switched out of the modu-' 
lator input. Let us say that 
the transmitter will grind out 
10 Watts under such condi-, 
tions- Provided things are set 
up properly, if the camej^a is| 
switched in but the lens is- 
capped we should get an 
approximation of the blacfc 
level output. This should be^ 
about 75% of peak output or 
7-5 Watts. If we uncap the 
lens on an average scene we 
would get an average powei^ 
output reading typical or 
what would be obtained 
under normal operations- 
This average level should run 
about 50% of peak output, or 
about 5 Watts. The average 
power percentage (relative to 
peak) will obviously vary con- 
siderably with the subject but' 
it is a convenient reference!, 
and, unless otherwise noted, 
all test results will be quoted 
as average power output. 

Fig, 4 shows one path test 
between WB8)XF and myself 
at various average power out- 



put levels. Both of us are 
'above average terrain and 
:about 8 miles apart, with the 
intervening path consisting of 
gently rolling hills. Total 
system antenna gain is 27 dB 
(10 dB + 17 dB). Several 
intervening hills do not permit 
line of sight conditions at the 
antenna heights used in this 
and the following test. The 
■first picture (10 Watts) is just 
'at the threshold of visibility. 
6ince ihe basic modulated 
(exciter is running about 1 
iWatt output, additional 
system gain of 10 dB is 
required to reach the thresh- 
old of visibility. Note, 
however, that comparatively 
jlittle additional g^in is 
jrcquircd to boost the picture 



vt 



i 



rom the threshold level to a 



point where it is quite accept- 
able. Referenced to the 
threshold, an additional 1.5 
idB {15 Watts), 3 dB (20 
jWatts), and 4.5 dB (30 
Watts) result in progressively 
.better pictures. Depending 
upon your tolerance for 
snow, anywhere between 3 
and 6 dB of additional gain 
wilt certainly produce accept- 
able pictures. Once you have 
^boosted the signal to the 
l^oint where it can be seen at 
ithe other end, comparatively 
little additional gain is needed 
to make the path usable, 
WB8JXF's antenna (a 10 dB 
corner reflector) was only 10 
Feet high for this test. Raising 
lis antenna from 10 to 20 
reet produces about 5 dB 
increase due to height gain, 
which means that pictures at 
Ihe 10 Watt level would now 
be equivalent to those at 30 
Watts with the previous 
bntenna height. Note that all 
that is required is that the 
^otal system be increased by 
8*6 dB, which can be 
Achieved by any combination 
bf factors at either end of the 
circuit. Conversely^ a similar 
kmal! drop in gain can have 
pisastrous consequences if 
J/ou are near the threshold in 
terms of system performance. 
Even over our short path it Es 
feasy to document small 
fchanges in path loss when 
operating at the 5-10 Watt 
average power output level. 





B 



Fig, Z External (A) and intemot (B) views of the in-line power 
meter shown in Fig. & The meter is kept in the transmitter 
line at all times to monitor power output 



The chants amount to no 
more than 3 dB fluctuations 
in path loss, but if you want 
acceptable performance every 
evening you must incorporate 
that 3 dB as a buffer in the 
form of additional system 
gain« 

Fig, 5 shows a similar test 
sequence, only this time the 
threshold was at 5 Watts 
average with power incre- 
ments of 10, 15p and 20 
Watts shown for comparison. 
This series, showing some of 
the station equipment^ also 
shows the Bird wattmeter 
used to monitor power out- 
put — you are not getting 
estimates based on guesses 
from a #47 iampl 

There is no doubt that the 
most effective means of 
monitoring power output in 
the 420-450 MHz band is a 
Bird wattmeter with a suit- 
able set of slugs for the power 
levels you wish to use. It is 
highly doubtful that without 
the useof WBSJXF'sBirdwe 
would now be sending 
pictures back and forth. The 
problem is of course that the 
little devils are expensive and, 
although it is usually possible 
to borrow one for a short 



time to tune up a transmitter 
or check the antenna system, 
what is needed is an inexpen- 
sive yet reasonably accurate 
means of monitoring power 
output so that one needn't be 
afraid to tinker with the 
transmitter. The ever popular 
VHF Monomatch^ works 
well for the lower VHF 
bands, but is more critical in 
layout to get a good null 
when used at 432, Numerous 
descriptions of more elegant 
directional couplers are avail- 
able, but these are tedious to 
construct- It is possible to 
effectively modify the basic 
monomatch concept, how- 
ever^ if all we are interested in 
is measuring forward power. 
Such an approach is illus- 
trated in schematic form in 
Fig, 6 and with photos rn Fig. 
7. This basic unit will 
effectively monitor power 
output up to about 100 
Watts. If you run higher 
power, you can go to RG-8 
foam cable and a shorter 
pickup loop. The internal pot 
can be set for full-scale 
deflection al any desired 
power level down to less than 
1 Watt. Calibration is best 
accomplished using a Bird or 



169 



mo 



^ 80 

ft 

O 

* 40 












^ 










9 

/ 








__J^ 


/ 




y 




/ 


y 






/ 




^ 


^J^ 







JmSET A 



4 e 

METEIi READING. 1mA 1 



9 



4-fl. 



F\g. S. CaUbrQilon curve for the author *s in-fine power meten 
Curve A (s for 432 MHz and curve B is for the two meter band 
Provided the antenna system exhibits a tow swr, once you have 
caUbraied your meter you can reiiably use it for power output 
measurements. The calibration curves will differ for each 
instrument, so there is no way to avoid the task of calibration 
if you want it to be useful. 



similar unit for setup, A good 
50 Ohm load is required, buL 
this is easy at 432 -- simply 
use 50-100 feel of RG-58/U 
(the older the better) termirv 
ated with a 50 Ohm resistor. 
Using ih€ Bird as a reference, 
set the transmitter for the 
desired peak value (50 Watts 
for example) and then insert 
the meter into the line (start- 
ing with the pot at the 
maximum resistance setting)* 
The pot is then advanced 
until full-scale meter deflec- 
tion is obtained. Now reduce 
the transmitter power in steps 
(40, 30, 20 and 10 Watts for 
example), comparing the 
meter reading with the power 
as indicated by the Bird watt- 
meter. The meter may be 
used in several power ranges 
by switching in different pots 
with each range being calibra- 
ted as indicated. The adjust- 
ment pots should be internal 
to eliminate the urge to 
linker with them and thus 
throw off your careful 
calibration at some later time. 
You can then use your meter 
readings to prepare a calibra- 
tion curve. An example of 
such a curve is shown in Fig. 
8. As I on gas you are working 
into a reasonable toad (low 
swfj you wilt be able to 
estimate your power output 
quite nicely anywhere in the 
band. The meter can also be 
calibrated for other bands, 
but in that case you leav&the 
pots as set for 432 and simply 
tabulate power ouiput against 



the meter readings. The fixed 
geometry of the pickup loop 
causes the instrument to be 
less sensitive at lower 
frequencies, as shown by the 
two meter curve included in 
Fig. 8. 

See how interesting it is to 
read all the articles in 73 each 
month! Even if you never 
intend to operate TV, you 
now have a reference for a 
simple and cheap instrument 
(less than $20) for keeping 
track of your power output 
in any mode on any VHF 
band. 

Transmitters 

There are many approach- 
es that can be taken to anrive 
at a suitable transmitting 
system. One of the more 
common procedures is the 
modification of a commercial 
transmitter strip obtained on 
the surplus market. Some of 
these modulate quite easily 
with adequate bandwidth 
(RCA *'Carfone" and G.E. 
'*Prog Line*'), while others 
are more difficult to use 
(Motorola T44). The primary 
advantage of this approach is 
that you have a well engineer- 
ed transmitter operating at 
moderate power levels. The 
disadvantages are the bulky 
power supplies and the fact 
that replacement lubes are 
getting harder to find at 
reasonable prices. Both JXF 
and myself decided to opt for 
a more modern approach, 
starting with a basic crystal 







VIDEO 
kNPUT 




m 



lod 






B*TQ ALL 
STjftfiES |MCCyt 
FiMAL 






^ 



Hlf ssoo* 



LEVEL 



lOO 



B- fO T1432B 
FWl*L OUTPUT 



Fig, 9. Video modulator, designed by WB8JXF, for the 
TX-432B transmitter strip. Unless otherwise noted, fixed 
resistors are 1/2 Walt anils. The Ik level control can be a 1/4 
Watt PC pot mounted on the modulator board, or it can be a 
conventional panel mount control. Since it is usually not 
adjusted following setup, it is perhaps best to mount it 
intemalfy to prevent tinkering. No heat sinks are required for 
use with the TX-432t but, if other transmitters are to be 
modulated (the modulator will sink up to 7/2 Ampjj they may 
be required, Some tube-type cameras have a dc component In 
their output that will alter the bias on the input transistor, 
This can be eliminated by adding silicon diodes in series with 
the input (inset A) until the modulator provides proper video 
swing. JN914 or other small signal diodes are fine here. No 
diodes will be required with solid state cameras. No terminat- 
ing resistor is required at the input, as this function is taken 
care of by the input transistor itself Several features con- 
tribute to the excellent performance of the modulator^ 
including the use of high frequency transistors and the 
incorporation ofdc coupling throughout, 

controlled solid state exciter, the crystal to check for this 



The one we use is the 
TX-432B from VHF 
Engineering (see ads in 75). 
The kit for this strip costs 
$39,95 J and one approach to 
using it as a TV transmitter is 
described in **Simple 
Amateur TV Transmitter."^ 
The strip is constructed 
following the kit instructionSi 
with the single modification 
involving re-orienting a single 
RFC so that B+ for the final 
can be brought out on a 
single land without using 
additional components. 
Attachment of the output 
coax to the board is critical 
for maximum output and 
stability. Short exposed leads 
are a must, and I achieved a 
30% boost in output power 
by soldering the flange of a 
BNC connector directly to 
the foil groundplane with the 
center pin going directly to 
the rf output pin on the 
board. The object is to tune 
the exciter for maximum 
stable output into a 50 Ohm 
load. The final will take off 
on its own at certain tuning 
settings, and you should pull 



possibility when you think it 
is tuned up. You will get 
between 1 and 1.5 Watts out- 
put at 13.8 V, depending 
upon your specific output 
transistor. If you are getting 
much more output, you 
should suspect self-oscill^ 
tion. The transmitter strip is 
quite clean when properly 
tuned. Heat sinks are 
provided for the driver and 
final output transistors^ but, 
in both versions we have 
built, the pre-driver has run 
uncomfortably warm, 
requiring an additional heat 
sink. 

Reference 3 describes a 
video modulator for the 
exciter, but another circuit, 
designed by WB8JXF, is 
shown in Fig, 9. This modula- 
tor is essentially noncritical in 
terms of parts placement and 
lead length to the transmitter 
boardp and has more than 
adequate bandwidth for use 
of an aural subcarrier audio 
system (more on that later). 
With the camera connected to 
the modulator, the level pot 
should be adjusted for a 



170 



power output of approxi- 
mately 50% of what you 
obtain with the camera 

d iscon nee ted. The camera 
should be set up on a proper- 
ly lighted siibjecl for this 
step. Final setting of the level 
cohtrol can be optimized 
while watching the picture, 
Al one extreme the video will 
"white oiJt" with very little 
power output from the strip, 
while at the other extreme 
you wilt have plenty of con- 
trast but the picture will 
become unstable as you grad- 
ually eliminate the sync 
threshold. With normal video 
input the output will be 50% 
of peak, rising to about 75% 
if the lens is capped. Some 
older lube- type cameras have 
a dc component in the output 
sigriat, which wilt mess up the 
bias on the input transistor or 
the modulator. This problem 
can be eliminated by adding 
one or more silicon diodes in 
series with the input to the 
base until you have knocked 
the dc component down to 
the point where you get good 
video swing. An old Dage 
camera I used required three 
such diodes in series. No 
diodes will be required for 
solid state cameras. Fig. 10 
shows a photograph of my 
own exciter and video modu- 
lator. 

When properly set up, the 
modulated exciter puts out a 
very nice picture that Is limit- 
ed in resolution only by the 
camera you employ. The 
main difficulty is that it 
simply does not have enough 
power to carry very far, I can 
shoot a nice picture around 
town (WB8JXF could do the 
same except that he doesn't 
live in a town!), but the 
picture quality drops off dye 
to snow within a few miles. 
With everything optimized 
over the 8 mile path between 
us, we can exchange barely 
recognizable pictures with the 
basic e^tciter* The answer of 
course is higher power, and 
here WB8JXF and I took 
different routes, mostly to 
see what could be accom- 
plished with various ap- 
proaches. 

The route I took involved 




Fig. JO. The basic exciter md video modulator used In our AT V operations, in tfie author's 
version, sltown here, the transmitter strip is mounted on standoffs with the modu/ator board 
mounted yerticafiy next to the exciter strip^ An extra large chassis was used, because I initially 
thought I would mount a power amplifier along with the exciter^ but later decided to keep the 
exciter as an Independent unit for demonstrations and portable work. A socket was used for the 
audio IC on the transmitter strip^ but the IC is removed because the modulator is not being 
used at the present time. The additional heat sink added to one of the driver transistors (third 
from the left) shows clearly. A BNC connector is used to couple the rf off the board because 
this resulted in approximately 30% more power output than simpiy attaching the coax directly 
to the output pins. 



the use of the Motorola 
MHW-710 power module as a 
linear amplifier. Reference 3 
describes this as a **1 Watt in, 
10 Watts out" module, but, 
as we shall see^ this Is not 
strictly correct. Two versions 
of the module are of interest 
to amateurs,, depending upon 
your video frequency. The 
MHW-7T0-1 covers 400-440 
MHz without tuning and the 
MHW-710-2 does the same 
over a 440-470 MHz frequen- 
cy range. Both cost $41.50 
and are available from 
Motorola distributors across 
the country. The module is 
basicajly an IC that requires 
very few additional compo- 
nents to do its job* Fig. 11 
shows the schematic of my 
power amplifier using this 
module. A photo of the 
module and associated 
components is shown in Fig, 
12. The module is one of the 
easiest- to-u so rf components t 
have ever come across, and 
the amplifier is simplicity 
personified. The whole thing 
is constructed in a small 
aluminum chassis using a 
piece of double-sided glass 
board lo provide for short 
ground returns. The board is 
mounted to the inner surface 
of the chassis with several 
screws and the input connec- 
tor^ to assure that the inner 
copper surface is actually at 
ground potential. A cutout in 
the board is provided so that 
the module can be mounted 
directly to the metal chassis. 



with thermal grease applied 
between the metal IC ground 
slab and the chassis surface. A 
large heat sink is mounted on 
the other side of the chassis, 
secured by the same screws 
that mount the IC. Use 
thermal grease at the inter- 
face between the heat sink 
dtid the chassis to assure good 
heat transfer. The amplifier is 
unconditionally stable if the 



exposed ends of the coax 
cables are kept very short — 
particularly the output line. 
Subminiature RG-174 is used 
to minimize lead stress on the 
module. Grounded IC pins, 
coax shields, and the ground- 
ed side of the bypass capaci- 
tors are soldered directly to 
the copper ground plane, A 
power supply capable of 
delivering at least 4 Amps at 



JZ 




t 



m 



4\ 



1/2 w 



Fig, IL Schematic for the circuit utilizing the Motorola 
MHW-7iO power module in linear TV service. J J is a 
Switchcraft 3501 FR phono jack. Interconnection to the 
module is made with a short lengths of RG-1 74 coax. A piece 
of double-sided circuit board with a cutout to accommodate 
the module (Fig, 12} permits sliort ground leads for input and 
output coax, bypass capacitors^ and the grounded pins of the 
module. The schematic shows the fC pins as viewed from t/ie 
top of the module. The metal slab of the module should be 
mounted directly to the aluminum chassis using thermal 
grease, with the heat sink mounted on the other side of the 
chassis in a si mi far manner }2 is an SO-239 connector 
interconnected to the module with another short length of 
RG-1 74. Small coax is used to minimize lead stress on the 
module. Output lead length (exposed center conductor and 
shield at both ends of the output coax) should be kept to an 
absolute minimum. /J is connected to the exciter by 50 feet 
of RG-} 74. This length is gradually trimmed until the proper 
drive level is obtained as outlined in the text. RFC — 8 turns 
#22 enamel on a I megohm J Watt resistor. 



17t 




Fig. 7Z Under-chassJs \/{ew of the MHW-710 power amplifier circuit. A piece of doubles ided 
glass PC board is mounted on the Inside of the chassis surface to provide for direct ground 
returns for the power module pins, bypass capacitors, and the coax shields. This board is 
secured to the chassis with several screws and the input connector, A cutout in the board 
permits the metal mounting slab of the IC to be grounded directly to the aluminum chassis. 
Thermal grease is used to provide thermal coupling between the ICand the chassis. A large heat 
sink is mounted on the outside of the chassis, secured by the same screws used to mount the 
power module. Thermal grease should also be used in mounting the heat sink. Mounted in this 
fashion, the amplifier can run continuously at peak output (75 Watts) without overheating. The 
amplifier is unconditionally stable provided the free ends of the output coax are kept to an 
absoiute minimum. The relay used to switch power to the amplifier during transmit is just 
visible to the left. Ideally the amplifier should work into a load with an swr of less than 2:h I 
have made a few mistakes in this regard, and the module still works, but extended operation at 
full power into a large mismatch will probably do you in eventually* 



13,8 V will be required, as 
the chip draws almost 40 

Watts averages input under 
modulation. 

If driven directly by the 
modulated exciter, the 
module will put out almost 
20 Watts, but very little 
modulation will be evident. 
Only 50 mW average drive is 
actually required, and the 
chip simply isn't linear when 
driven by 1 Watt from the 
exciter* The module performs 
excellently under modulation 
If we drop the drive level to 
the proper value^ but we do 
not want to alter the tuning 
or voltage on the exciter^ 
because this wilt alter its 
characteristics when modula- 
ted and will require that it be 
reset up if operated indepcn- 
denily. Major changes in load 



will also have an adverse 

effect on picture quality. The 
answer turns out to be the 
use of a moderate length of 
RG'174 coax for coupling 
bt^iween the exciter and the 
module, This small coax is 
very lossy at this frequency 
and will drop the power to 
the module very smoothly 
while maintaining the proper 
50 Ohm load on the exciter. 
Start with 50 feet of this 
cable (it's only $.08 per 
foot). With no camera 
connected to the modulator, 
gradually prune the coax 
while watching the power 
output from the amplifier. 
Slow down when you get to 
10 Watts and begin checking 
with the camera to be sure 
that black level and avera^ 
output are tracking at 75% 



and 50% respectively. The 

module will not stay linear 
beyond 15 Watts peak, and I 
play it safe by stopping ai 13 
Watts. If you push for the last 
possible Watt^ you will start 
infringing on the sync thresh- 
old^ which will hurt your 
weak signal performance even 
if it is not noticeable in close* 
If you trim off a little too 
much coax, it's hard to put it 
back together, but you can 
recover by compensating with 
slight adjustment of the level 
control on the exciter. You 
should try to get it right using 
just the coax, hov^ever, for 
then you will have the exciter 
set up properly if you want 
to use it independently. Fig, 
13 ts a photograph of the 
comp letc transmitter^ 
showing the coaxial coupling 



and the heat sink on the 
power amplifier The result is 
a solid state ATV transmitter 
that performs as well as a 
converted surplus strip and 
which can be built for 
$100-130, including packag- 
ing. 

The basic ATV transmitter 
just described puts out 
enough power to function 
well over normal paths of 
10-12 miles, and it can also 
be used to drive an amplifier 
in the 50-100 Watt class. 
There are several ways to go 
in getting to this latter power 
level. If you want to stay in 
the solid stale business, there 
are a number of solid state 
linears which will do the job 
nicely, KLM makes two 
amplifiers that will do the 
job. Their PA10-35CL 
($139.95} will put out 35^ 
Watts (average) when driven 
by the basic transmitter, and 
the PA10-70CL ($245.95) 
will deliver about 70 Watts 
under the same conditions, 
VHF Engineering has recently 
announced the introduction 
of a simitar series of amplifi- 
ers. Both companies, and 
others as well, are tooling up 
for amplifiers that will deliver 
comparable outputs when 
driven by the basic TX-432B 
exciter, but amplifiers with 
35-70 or more Watts out with 
1-2 Waits of drive are expen- 
sive. Costwise, it is far 
cheaper to incorporate the 
MHW-710 module to get 
enough drive to use one of 
the less expensive 10 Watt 
input amplifiers. All of these 
amplifiers require a regulated 
high current supply. {The 
PA10-35 draws 6 Amps and 
the PAlO-70 requires 18 
Amps.) So some pretty hefty 
power supplies are in order. 
Many manufacturers are 
marketing supplies for use 
with solid state HF trans- 
ceivers in the 200 Watt range, 
but check the specs carefully 
if you plan to avoid the hassle 
of building a supply. Many of 
the HF supplies are rated for 
SSB service, and it is the 
continuous ratings thai you 
should heed in making a 
selection* 

Solid state linears with 



172 



their requirements for 
massive power supplies make 
it reasonable to consider 
tube-type amplifiers for more 
power output, as suitable 
supplies are readily available 
and often cost tess than a low 
voltage supply required for 
comparable output v/ith a 
solid state linear. \VB8JXF 
weni this route using the 
basic TX-432B exciter 
described earlier. One of the 
nicest amplifiers for outputs 
in the 30-100 Watt range is 
the cavity configuration using 
a 4CX250 described in the 
The Radio Amateur's VHF 
Manual,^ This amplifier will 
deliver 30-40 Watts (average) 
on an 800 volt transceiver 
power supply and can push 
Op to close to 100 Watts 
average at maximum rated 
voltagie. Do not attempt to 
drive such an amplifier direct- 
[y with the TX-432B exciter. 
WB8JXF did and lost the 
Qulput transistor; It seems 
that the 250 tube series 
develops rather high rf grid 
voltages (a fact not men- 
tioned enough in the litera- 
ture), and the poor 2N5913 
in the output of the exciter is 
only rated at 14 V on the 
collector! WB8JXF employs a 
2C39 in grounded grid as a 
buffer between the exciter 
and the cavity, with excellent 
results. The 2C39 is set up to 
provide very little gain, and 
functions primarily to protect 
the exciter from the ravenous 
grid circuit of the cavity. 
Power output of the 
MHW-710 is more than ade- 
quate to drive such a cavity 
using lossy couplings thus 
protecting the power module. 
ir there is sufficient demand, 
WBSfXF could undoubtedly 
be persuaded to document his 
power train, which not ctfily 
works well, but also employs 
some rather interesting ideas 
on coupling the exciter, 
2C39, and cavity amplifier. If 
you want to go the limit on 
power, then the K2RIW 
kilowatt^ is probably the best 
route* 

You will note that our 
system philosophy has 
involved the use of a well set 
up exciler %vith linear amplifi' 




Fig. 13. Rear view of the complete basic A TV transmitter using the TX-432B exciter and video 

modulator (long chassis) and the MHW*7W power module (short chassis). The heat sink on the 
latter is Visible, as is the coiled length of RG-J 74 used to drop the exciter power output to the 
proper drive level for the power amplifier. The front panel holds the TR switch, camera input 
and monitor output jackSt and video switch. The vacant space in the collection of boxes is for 
the cavity final (4CX250) which is presently under construction. An oversize panel is used to 
allow for metering and control hardware for this amplifier. 13.8 V comes into the power 
amplifier compartment and is Jumpered over to the exciter. This permits power to be applied 
separately to the exciter if desired^ with the latter connected directly to the antenna. 



ers to get to the desired 
power output level. You will 
occasionally read that such 
strings of linears result in a 
toss of picture resolution. 
This simply is not so if the 
stages are tuned properly* 
The linear approach does 
have the advantage that the 
power train can be broken 
down to any useful inter- 
mediate power level for 
demonstrations and such — 
something that is not possible 
with a modulated final. When 
we are talking about high 
powered tube finals, linears 
would appear to present a 
problem with power output^ 
since maximum efficiency 
with AM linears is limited to 
about 35%* An interesting 
fact discovered in our tests is 
that excellent video quality 
can be obtained in class B. 
The finals can thus be biased 
AB1 for local work and easily 
shifted to class B for really 
long haul schedules. The only 
effect of the latter operating 
conditions is a very slight 
compression of the grey scale. 



which actually may improve 
subjective picture quality 
under conditions of high 
noise. The effect is hardly 
noticeable locally, but you 
can always shift back to ABl 
for color or other critical 
applications. Given the flexi- 
bility of line^ power trains, 
this approach seems to us to 
be better than grid modular 
tfon of the final, for there is 
little or no difference in 
effective power output at any 
given input when the power 
difference could actually 
make or break a contact. For 
those who might doubt, the 
test photographs of Figs. 4 
and 5 were made with the 
cavity final operating rn class 
B! 

Sound 

There are many ways to 
handle the matter of sound to 
go along with the pictures. 
The easiest way is, in our 
opinion, the best. It involves 
using your existing phone 
equipment on another VHF 
band (2 meters is ideal). This 



gives you a reliable audio link 
that is so essential in setting 
up a system and permits voice 
communication without 
firing up the video gear. 
Another substantial advan- 
tage of this approach is that 
your audio commentary will 
receive maximum exposure 
and perhaps gel you some 
new converts. If you put the 
voice up with the video 
signal, no one but your 
cronies will hear and you cut 
your chances of snagging new 
converts. 

Another approach is to 
simyltaneousiy FM modulate 
the exciter, recovering the 
audio on a separate FM 
receiver tuned to the carrier 
frequency. This is easy with 
the TX432B exciter since 
there is an FM modulator 
already on the board, but it is 
hard to keep sync buzz out of 
the receiver, particularly in 
the case of a signal that does 
not limit fiilly during video 
modulation. 

Audio in conjunction with 
the TV receiver can be 



173 



accomplished in two ways. 
The first is the use of an aural 
subcarrier unit in which a 
voice modulated 4,5 MHz 
oscillator (FM) is mixed with 
the video at the input to the 
moduEator of the TV trans- 
mitter. This results in two FM 
sidebands 4,5 MHz from the 
video signaL The upper one is 
demodulated as sound in the 
TV set. Several problems are 
associated with this method. 
First, the video amp must be 
flat to 4.5 MHz (the one in 
Fig. 5 is) to pass the FM 

subcarrier. The more power 
you apply in the subcarrier, 

the more you take from the 

picture signal^ so compromise 

is required. The subcarrier 
unit must be designed so that 
It does not load the modu- 
lator input if a loss of resolu- 
tion is to be avoided. A nice 
subcarrier circuit is described 
in *' Practical Ideas for the 
ATV Enthusiast/'*^ The most 
elegant approach is to use 
another FM transmitter 4-5 
MHz above your video carrier 
frequency. The most effective 



sound level is achieved with 
an output level from the 
voice transmitter of 1/3 to 
1/2 of the average video out- 
puL This ratio is in terms of 
the effective radiated power, 
so the antenna gain for the 
voice transmitter should be 
taken into consideration. 
Simple yagi arrays are fine 
here since the voice signal is 
narrowband- 

Summary 

This article has covered a 
lot of ground in attempting 
to document an effective 

ATV system. The system out* 
lines provided are realistic, 
and if you are interested in 
trying ATV you can imple- 
ment them with expectations 
of success, tf you are within 
line of sight of an ATV 
r e p e a t e r > you can 
undoubtedly get by with far 
less in the way of equipment, 
but our approach has been 
oriented toward point to 
point service. When band 
conditions are good, you wilt 
get even exceptional results 



with a ^ven power level, but 
you will have assembled the 
station with a realistic idea of 
what you can accomplish at 
any time. 

I first got into ATV when 
virtually every item of equip- 
ment had to be buiil from 
scratch, and when you were 
done the technology was such 
that you occasionally 
wondered if it was worth the 
effort. Today the effort and 
costs are actually less than 
they used to be^ and there is 
no comparison in terms of 
the results you can achieve. 

ATV is a fascinating aspect 
of our hobby. You will have 
to tinker to optimize the 
system, but there is lots of 
room for real experimenta- 
tion. The biggest stumbling 
block is simply getting an 
effective two-way operation 
going, I think we have 
developed some workable 
guidelines to make that task 
easier. 

Once you arc on you can 
branch out in any direction — 
color. Pong, microprocessors 



via ATV time-sharing — you 
name iL The name of thp 
game is both fun and a little 
ecfucation. If you do give it a 
try, you will not only enjoy 
demonstrating your efforts, 
but will also have accom- 
plished something far more in 
the traditions of amateur 
radio then simply playing 
with store-bought goodies. 
For about what it would cost 
for a fancy FM toy, you can 
come up and join the video 
freaks for some real pioneer- 
ing ^ why not give it your 
best shot? 1 ■ 

References 

The Radio Amateuf'i VHf 
Manual^ ARRLi Newington (H" 

my edition). 

Brown, B., "Amateur TV Re- 
ceiving System/' 7J* June, 1976^ 

Brown, B,, '*Slmple Amateur 
TV Transmitter/' 73, June, 1976, 
^ The Radio Amateur's VHF 
Manual, ARRL, Newington CT, 
2nd edition, p. 257. 
^ Knadle, "A Strip-line Kilowatt 
Amplifier for 432 UHz" QST, 
April and May, 1972. 
*0*Hara, T. R., *'Practicar Ideas 
for the ATV Enthusiast, Part II " 
QST, Febfuarv, 1075. 



i 




NFVFP Sav DH 



. A W2niSDll 



from page 95 

delegates foynd little enthusiasm for 
ihh move with the other countries, 

and head counts of the countries 
indicated that we were very fsr short 
of the needed mafarity. 

On the opening day of the con- 
ference, the U.S. managed to get the 
Netherlands to start things off by 
proposing the 3-30 MHz postpone- 
ment, sort o! in the hopes that it 
VH^ouldn't look as if the U.S. was 
pushing for it, and thus sM\en it wbs 
defeated, it would not be a U.S. 
defeat. The entire assembly of the 
plenipotentiary meelin§ was thunder- 
struck when the Soviet Union rose 
and secor>ded the Netherlands moiion. 
With a large numbef of smalt nations 
in the U*S,S*R. pocket, the motion 
was carried and amateur radio was 
saved until the next conference. 

How did this happen? It was a pure 
fluke- Khriijshchev had jusi vtsited the 
U.S. and been most cordially weJ- 
comed by Ike. When he returned 
home, he wanted to make sure that 
his good feelings toward the U,S, were 
reflected, and it happened that the 



eOfTORfAL BY WAYf, 

first opportunity to show friendship 
between the U,S.S,R. and the U.S. 
came at this ITU meeting in Geneva^ 
When you consider that not tong after 
this Gary Powers was ^lol down arvd 
tfie U.S,S,B, mood changed^ you can 
appreciate how we tucked out* 

1964 -THE ITU 

As more and more of the emerging 
nations joir^ed the ITU. the balance of 
power changed from the U.S./ 
European block to the third world. 
The American Secretary General of 
the fTU was voted out and replaced 
by an Ethiopian. The American who 
realty ran the ITU was ftred and the 
whole ptace changed to reflect the 
new African/Asian influence. 

Alter the Ethiopian Secretary 
GeneraJ, they voted in one from India, 
with the second man in command 
from Australia. Rememtief, if you 
wiU. the 20 kHz ham band proposal of 
India and the 50 kHz proposal of 
AustraMa. Amateur radio no longer 
had good friends in high places. 

1966- I TRAVEL 
With a possible frequency confer- 



ence scheduled for 19^, it s^med 
like time to take stock. I decided to 
take a trip around the world and visit 
some of the countries that woutd be 
deciding the future of the ham bands 
at the ITU. My trip took me to 
Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Ethiopia, 
Sudan, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, 
Iran, Afghanistan, India, Nepal, 
ByriTia, Thailand, Singapore. Aus* 
tralia, New Zealand, New Caledonia, 
Fiji Islands, Western Samoa, American 
Samoa, Tahiti, and back to tfie U.S. I 
DXpediiioned from tS of the 
countries, working x&t^ of thousands 
ot amateurs as I traveled. 

In each country. I got together wiih 
the national amateur radio society of 
that country or with the local ama- 
teurs where there was no significant 
society. In several, I visited the 
ministers of communications to 
explain the importance of amateur 
radio to them and their countries. 

One of the results of this trip was 
the development of the concept of 
having ham ambassadors visit smdMer 
coyntries to point out the benefits to 
them of encouraging amateur radio. 
This was written up in my November, 
19G6, editorjal in 73 Magaiioe . , . 
written while I was in Sydney, Aus^ 
traiia. 

While in Ethiopia, I got together 
with the ex Secretary General of the 
ITU and exp lamed amateur radio to 
him. He had very little background in 
It and became most enthusiastic when 
I pointed out the benefits to emerging 
nations of the hobby. I showed him 



how people could be encouraged to 
learn electronics and communications 
on their ovwi time and pretty much at 
their own expense, and thus become a 
very valuable resource for the country 
, . - technicians and engineers* He 
suggested that J should get together 
with the current Secretary General of 
the ITU when I was in India, and he 
helped arrange a meeting. 

In Delhi, I did n»eel with the 
Secretary General arxl discussed the 
importance of amateur radio to 
emerging nations wAth htm. I pointed 
out that smalt country students 
normally think in tenns of being 
lawyers, doctors, or civil servants, and 
the concept of an engineering career is 
to^. With amateur radio as an 
impetus, many of the students would 
want to try for technical school train- 
ing and the country would benefit 
greatly. 

Communications is the basis for 
growth of any civilization, and when 3 
country has to import everything elec- 
trical and electronic, including techni- 
cians at S200 a day Crom Sweden or 
Switzerland, they are able to buy very 
little in the way of telephone systems 
and radio communicaiions. With local 
technicians, they would be able to 
buy much more. 

The Secretary General W3& 
enthusiastic when j suggested that I 
could provide a sample set of amateur 
radio regulations for the ITU lo make 
available and recommend to srndtler 

Cotnimmd on page 177 



174 



D O V E T R Q 





MPC-IOOOC 

Multipath- Diversity 

Amateur Net: I49&X0 



The MPC-IOOOC features MULTIPATH CORRECTION, IN-BAND DIVERSITY (single 

channel copy during deep selective fades) Operation and a PHASE-CONTINUOUS 
AFSK TONE KEYER, The Mark and Space channels are CONTINUOUSLY tuneable 
from 1200 to 3100 Hz. The internal RY GENERATOR and DUAL-MODE AUTOSTART 
(FSK or MARK) are standard, as are rear panel provisions for SIGNAL REGENERA- 
TION 3nd SPEED CONVERSION peripherals. 




MPC-IOOOCR 

Signal Regeneration & 
Up Down Speed Conversion 

Amateor Net: $595,00 



The MPC*1000CR combfnes all the features of the MPC-IQOOC with the TSR-200 
SPEED CONVERTER-REGENERATOR. A front panel SIGNAL SPEED switch provides 
electronic "gear-shifting'* between 60, 66, 75 and 100 WPM speeds. All inconning 
and outgoing signals are regenerated by a CMOS UART and a crystal ^control led 
DUALCLOCK to less than 0.5% bias distortion, providing an extremely low error- 
rate on weak and badly distorted signals. 




MPCIOOOR 

Dual-Uart Regeneration, 
ZOO Character Fifo 
Memory & Word Correction. 

Amateur Net: $820.00 

The MPC-IOOOR combines the features of the MPC-IOOOCR with the TSR-600 SPEED 
CONVERTER-REGENERATOR and offers 200 characters of FIFO MEMORY, a DUAL- 
UART REGENERATOR that also providefs local copy during all PRELOAD-RECIR- 
CULATE functions, a WORD CORRECTION circuit that permits an incorrect word 
to be erased from memory by depressing the local keyboard's BLANK key, VAR* 
lABLE CHARACTER RATE and automatic BLANK/LTRS DIDDLE. Character OVER- 
RUN during down-speed conversion is prevented by an automatic CHARACTER RATE 
OVER-RIDE and TEE DEE INHIBIT circuit. Three preset AFSK TONE/SHIFT combi- 
nations are selectable from the front panel. 

The MPC-IOOOR (80 characters of memory), MPC-IOOOCA (Tri-tone AFSK), MPC- 
IOOOCR A (Trr-tone Regenerator) and MPC-IOOOCS (Crypto -Scram bier) are also 
available. 

Your QSL will bring complete specifications, or calf: 213-682-3705. 



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Simple 



Electronic Siren 



R^y Megirim K4DHC 
606 S£ 6ih Avenue 
Deerfield Beach FL 5Z441 



"W 



it 



'hatcha makin* 
Dad?" 
A microcomputer, son." 

"What's it do?" 

"Well, when it Is Finished, 
I hope to program it so it will 
run my rig. Every fifteen 
minutes it will initiate a re- 
ceiver scan of all the ham 
bands to search for rare DX. 
If a rare caKsign is recognizedj 
it will tune up the trans- 
mitter, select the best 
antenna^ call the station , and 
sound an alarm so I can tate 
over. H will also make out a 
QSL card and record the 
contact for my log," 
OhJ' 

'Why don't you go next 
door and play with Buddy so 
I can get this thing finished. 
It*s costing me a bunch and I 
don't want to make any 
mistakes in the wiring." 

"Yeah, ok. His dad fust 
made Buddy a turn signal for 
his bike. He makes a lot of 



**, 



<41 



-- it's loud! 



neat things for Buddy, He's 
real smarU See you later. 

Pop." 

Then It hits you. Is it 
realiy that long since you 
were pouring sand into a 
length of copper tubing so 
you could bend it into a tank 
coil for that super new 5 
meter modulated oscillator? 



And it can't possibly be so 
many years since you thrilled 
to the sound of Big Ben on 
49 meters with a one-lunger 
on a cigar box chassis. Tran- 
sistors? Who needed *em! 
Your vacuum tube superregen 
ran on 6 volts with the grids 
reversed. Remember? Ah, 
those were the fun years. 



m 




Fig. /. Schematic for the electronic siren. The c ire fed numbers 
correspond to numbered pads on the printed circuit board. 



An Electronic Siren 

Weli^ here is a fun thing 
you can build in a couple of 
hours that is guaranteed to 
make you a hero in the eyes 
of any youngster and iust 
possibly the envy of your 
neighbors. What Tm selling is 
an electronic siren. Not a new 
idea by any means, but this 
one has enough operating 
controls to make it particu- 
larly appealing. The circuit is 
self-starting, simpie, and runs 
on standard 9 volt radio 
batteries. Drain is low enough 
so you won't have to make a 
trip to the drug store every 
day for fresh batteries. You 
can vary the repetition rate 
from a long wail to a rapid 
warble, control the volume 
from soft to annoying^ vary 
the pitch and the symmetry. 

The circuit, as shown in 

Rg, 1, makes use of a type 
5558 dual op amp and 4 NPN 
transistors as the sctive ele- 
ments. The IC is used to 
generate a triangle wave much 
as any basic function gener- 
ator. This triangle can be 
distorted by means of the 
symmetry control to form 
either a fast rise or a slow rise 
sawtooth. This signal is 
applied as base bias to the 
astable multivibrator formed 
by Q1 and Q2. As the level of 
the triangle or sawtooth rises 
and falls, the charging time 
for the cross*coupling 
capacitors varies and causes a 
change in multivibrator fre- 
quency. Output is taken from 
one side of the multivibrator 
and squared up by direct- 
coupled amplifier Q3. The 
audio output stage^ 04^ is 
pulsed on and off by the 
square waves and provides 
plenty of noise with little 
expenditure of battery 
power. 

The siren contains about 5 

dollars wo rth of parts. 
Depending on the cost for an 
enclosure^ the tot^I outlay 
shouldn't exceed 10 bucks. 
All resistors are H Watt. The 
output transformer isn't 
critical. I used a 500 Ohm to 
voice coil type with PC leads 
for use with the board layout 
shown in Fig* 2, The tran- 



176 



hero 
makier 



4- 




PUh 



K4DHC 




lOK 



Fig. 2. PC pattern and parts placement for the Hero Maker. 



sistors are NPN silicon units. 
Mine were house-numbered 
cheapies in TO-18 cans which 
I picked up years ago. The J 
uF capaciiors are 50 voli 
discs. The 10 uF coupling 
capacitor in the audio section 
is an electrolytic. The 4.7 uF 
capacitor used in the integra- 
tor section of the tri^uigle 
generator should be a tan- 
taJum unit fur best results. I 
used a small dipped tantalum 
which fits the board layout. 
An axial lead type may be 
used by mounting it hairpin 
fashion. The operating switch 
can be either a push-button 
or a toggle switch to allow 



hands-off operation when 
used on a bicycle. 

Operation of the controls 
and their effect on the siren 
sounds will become apparent 
after a few minutes of use. 
The symmetry control is the 
only one whose purpose may 
elude you at first. The com- 
plete cycle consists of an 
audio tone which starts at a 
low frequency and rises to a 
high point before retracing its 
way back to the starting fre- 
quency. If the symmetry 
control is set at one end of its 
range, the rising wail of the 
siren can be stretched out to 
occupy the greatest portion 



of the cycle time or the 
falling wait can be made 
longer with the control at the 
other extreme. Somewhere in 
between, a symmetrical 
triangle is generated and the 
rise and fall portions of the 
siren sound writ be equally 
long. The pitch control varies 
the actual range of fre- 
quencies covered in one conrh 
plete cycle and the rate pot 
controls the number of com* 
plete cycles per unit of time. 
Most of the common siren 
sounds can be imitated with 
this toy and it will furnish 
hours of amusement for the 
youngsters, provided your 



nerves hold out If the kids 
do mount these on bicycles, 
it might be worth a little 
extra effort to make them 
removable. One of our neigh- 
bors' boys had his bicycle 
ripped off less than 12 hours 
after installing one of these 
sirens. It makes the prize just 
that much more enticing to a 
thief- 

So there it is; your golcten 
opportunity to be a hero. 
Why not put digital readouts, 
microprocessors, RAMs and 
ROMs out of your mind for a 
couple of hours while you 
build something just for the 
fun of it. Have a balH ■ 




..MW2l{lSI>lf 



rjl VS R ?4AV Oil 



from pBge 1 74 

countries. 

Upon returning from the thre* 
month trip around the world, I fountd 
the magazine m djre straits ... a 
month behind in production and 
almost bankrupt, (had lo get things in 
hand and work hard for several 
nroiithB before I could get to the 
substantial job of writing a set of 
international amateur radio regula- 
tions. 1 was partly done with them 
when i read in the newspapers that 
the Secretary Genera! had suddenly 
died. Welt« so much for ttiai projecL 

1969- HU 
I vtsited the ITU in Geneva at every 

opportunity to keep in touch with 
what was going on under the surface. 
White the African/Asian countries 
were strong enough to influence the 
vote of the tTU on many matters, 
they wete not well enough organized 
to force a general meeting to change 
the shortwave frequency allocations. 
The European nations were so far able 
to blocic every attempt at ffequency 
tatks. 



£DiTORiAi BY WAYNE GREEN 

1971 - ITU 

With the African nations growing 
stronger, a satellite frequency confer- 
ence was called for 197t and the U.S. 
participated, with the ARRL repre- 
senting amateurs worldwide. The 
ARRL went into the conference with 
237,254.77 MHz of satellite fre- 
quencies allocated to amateur radio. 
They came out with 7.5 MHz . . . ar^d 
only 3 MHi of that above 150 MHz! 
Thus they managed to lose 
237.247.27 MH^ of the amateiir satel- 
lite atlof^atton. 

This toss was duly reported in OST^ 
with the explartatlon that the con- 
feren^ might have gone tietter if they 
had done their homework. If they had 
ckjne as I su^ested in my November, 
1966, editorial, and sent ham repre- 
sentatives to visit the forel^ countries 
to make them aware of the benefits of 
amateur radio to them, we might have 
thousands of megahertz of satellite 
frequerKres today. They found many 
of the ITU delegates did not under- 
stand amateur radio and lew had any 
krtowleJge of how it mi^t benefit 
them. 

Satellites were stiU pretty new in 



1971, so the impact of tlie loss was 
not generally recognized. Now, as we 
think in terms of sateltlte communica- 
tions as a way for amateurs of all 
countries of the world to get together 
via synchronous satellites, we are 
beginning to appreciate what has been 
lost . . . and lost forever. 

1979- ITU 

The next conference is schedyled 
for 1979, and there is no indication 
that it will be anything but a replay of 
the 1959 situation, only without the 
U.S.S.R. to pull our fat out of the 
fire. There will be even more pressure 
for eliminating the shortwave ham 
bandSi, and fewer friends to try to 
hold them for us. 

The ARRL Has been generating a 
smoke screen of proposals for new 
shortwave ham bands^ none of which 
has been seriously accepted by even 
the U.S. delegation. 

Oo we yet have ham ambassadors 
visiting the third world countries to 
sell them on the value of am-ateyr 
radio [o their countries? You know 
ttie answer to that . . . no. 

1970 - JORDAN 
While visit irig Jordan and operating 
JY1 from the Royal Pataoe, I talked 
wh:h His Maiesty King Hussein about 
my plan for enoouragir>g amateur 
radio in emerging nattons as a way to 
get technical ly enthusiastic students 
who would then opt for engineering 
careers. Hussein asked me to explain 
the plan to his government, wtrich I 
did ... and it Wi^ put into action. 



despite a fierce civil war between 
Jordan and the resident Palestinians 
which began only a few days after I 
left, 

I returned again to Jordan in 1973 
and found that there were active ham 
clubs in every major city in Jordan, 
with over 500 licensed amateurs. The 
rules and regulations wefE: essentiallv 
those I had prepared for them and 
sent over shortly after my return \o 
the U.S. in 1970. As a result of the 
large number of technically interested 
youths in Jordan, the government was 
think ir>g in terms of setting up s radio 
crystal manufacturing plant and a 
small plant for making VHF trans- 
ceivers. These would have been totally 
imposible projects just three years 
before. 

In Jordan, the King supplied ham 
stations to each of the youth clubs 
arvj sent one man arournf to conduct 
code and theory classes, it worked. 

The growth of amateur radio before 
the ARBL pushed through their 
"incentive licensing" plans was 11% 
per year. If the League had not 
insisted on tryinf to force amateurs to 
get higher class licenses by taking 
frequencies away from them if they 
did not J we might have seen amateur 
growth continuing at that leveJ^ MyA 
we might have about 1,250,000 ama- 
teurs today. With numbers like that, 
we would not be having to worry 
about losing 220 MHz and other UHF 
bands. 

CommuBd Oft pas& !8! 



177 



Dsvid R.P^diolQk 
1 49 S. Porter 
Elgin IL 60120 



Digital To 
Audio Decoder 



-- for the blind operator 



About a year ago, I had 
an accident involving 
an exploding car battery 
whose shrapnel left me blind 
in one eye. As the anniversary 
of this unfortunate event 
passed me by, I got to think- 
ing about how lucky [ am to 
be blessed with sight and 
about those hams not so 
blessed, I thought how 
difficult it would be to do 
something most of us take for 



granted^ like reading a 
frequency counter or a digital 
voltmeter. 

So here is a device which 
overcomes one of the many 
difficulties experienced by a 
blind person invaived in any 
phase of electronics. In 
esserKe, it converts a binary 
coded decimal input, from 
any suitable piece of digital 
test gear, into a sequence of 
different tones — ten tones 




Photo h Digita! to audio decoder and Heathkit IB 11 00 
frequency counter. 

178 



representing the numbers 
zero to nine, and the length 
of the sequence equal to the 
number of digits displayed^ 
plus a sign indicator^ if 
desired. 

Theory 

Some readers unfamiliar 

with logic design may have a 
little trouble wading through 
the audio decoder's workings^ 
while others of you have 
probably spent the last ten 
minutes exploring the sche- 
matic and now understand its 
working better than t do. 

Perhaps the best place to 
start is with the sequence 
generator consisting of IC5, 
IC6, and IC7- IC5 is a familiar 
555 timer connected for 
astable operation, which 
means that it generates sharp 
edged pulses, about twice a 
second as determined by time 
constant RIO-CL IC6, a 
decade counter, advances one 
count as the 555's output 
swings low. When the counter 
counts to nine, the next pulse 
resets its count to zero. 

The count output, at ter- 
minals 1 A, 2B, 4C and 8D, is 

fed into IC7, which converts 
the 7490's BCD output to a 
one out of ten output. To 
clarify this a bit, suppose the 
7490's outputs were 1A=0, 
2B=1, 4C=1, 8D=0, This is 



the same as one 2 plus one 4, 
which is 6, Now only one of 
the 7442's ten outputs is acti- 
vated. Output six drops to 
zero. When another pulse 
arrives from the 555, the 
7490 will now store a 
•"seven" and the 7442's 
output seven will be a zero. 
The rest (including six) will 
be a one. So only one output 
is low at a time, and every 
tenth pulse starts the se- 
quence over* 

The sequencer drives the 
digit scanners IC1-IC3, aided 
by inverters in 1C8. (An 
inverter changes a zero to a 
one and vice versa.) The idea 
is to look at one digit at a 
time and convert its number 
into a corresponding tone and 
then move on to the next 
digit and repeat the process. 
But Tm getting a little ahead 
of the story here; first the 
right digit has to be selected. 
The NAND gates in IC1 , IC2, 
and IC3 are of the open 
collector variety. They 
provide one of two output 
states, much as a convention- 
al NAND, but, instead of 
ones and zeroes, these put 
out high impedances instead 
of ones and zeroes as in the 
regular NANDs. Caution: 
These are 7401 s or 7403s but 
not 7400s. The inputs to 
these open collector gates 
allow us to: 1) pass data from 
the data input terminals to 
the output terminals; and 2) 
make the gate outputs look 
like they are open switches. 
As long as we apply a data 
pass si^ai to only one of 
several g^tes whose outputs 
are tied together, the others 
look like they aren't there! 
The job of the sequencer, 
then, is to apply a "one"' pass 
command to only those four 
gates that are the input path 
for the digit we want. Since 
the data is inverted by the 
digit scanners, 1C4 rein verts 
the data to its proper form. 
Four gates must be used at a 
time, because it takes four 
bits to represent a number 
from zero to nine. 

At this point, the four 
outputs of IC4 first mimic 
the 100s place of the con- 
nected digital test equipment, 



"^-^^CM 



^ 7401 (3) 






SPEftKEFt 




OF DIG IQ^Q 

■ uz oien Oft SJCN^ 

HIT 1 0*t ^CHQ 



= ELEcmOLrTit 






Fig» L Schematic of 3!4-dfg{t digital to audio decoder. Resistors should all be 14 W ±liM or better^ unless noted. If not 
specified^ values are given in kQ^ i.e.^ 470 = 4701^. 



then the 10s place, and 
finally the Is place, as the 
sequencer steps from 1 to 2 
to 3- You may wonder what 
sequencer position zero does. 
It is the sign bit, in case you 
wish to connect the audio 
decoder to a digital VOM 



With this feature, or use it to 
indicate over range on a 
counter as I did. 

IC4*s output feeds IC9, 
which is another BCD, to one 
out of ten decoders, as we 
talked about in the 
sequencer. It has one 



f&o's Place 



tO^S PLACE 



NIXIE 



c 



a 



012 3*56709 



) C 



<ii^t*b^7BB 



IC3 



Al 



0-* 



itl 



c^ 



0-* 



n 



3 



important difference though: 
Its outputs are open collect* 
ofp just like the digit scanner 
gates. So once a^in, only the 
corresponding output of IC9 
wilt be brought low for any 
given Input number. This 
switches a different resistor 
into the voltage controlled 
oscillator circuit, ICIO; which 
in turn causes it to see a 



different voltage and generate 
a different tone* I set up the 
resistors to provide an 
increasing tone for increasing 
numbers. The resistors could 
be selected to play musical 
notes, Ql merdy amplifies 
the lone to drive a speaker. 

Optional Features 

C2, Q2, and associated 



nrvAC IN 



£^yM out # £^OfnA OR SWEATER 



\t2 
IDECpDEn DmV£R1 



41 



•6 



7475 

ILATCtil 



COMWOfJ 



12 



ftf 



fh 






IS 



C4 



to 



* 



iiT'yAt; 



D3 






life 



IC7 
74tS 

<LATCH1 



r 



♦CASE OF 509 
Pt (JUL A TOR 
NO NEfiTSIWK 
NECESSfiRT 



ALL DIO&€S 
tA tOClPIV 

Oft GREATER 



2 
1 



aovDC 



♦15 V 

igoufiqt 



'J- IOOOmF 



m 



TO T*aO 



TO T4^U 




*-L- 50^f ^J-^ 






/tf 



$ OUR at 



aov 



Fig. 2 Partml schematic of Heathkit IB J J 00 frequency Fig. 3. 7/7 V ac input power supply for digital to audio 
counter showing where to connect inputs from audio decoder, decoder. 



179 




Photo Z Audio decoder shown connected to Heathkit counter. 



parts cause the speaker to 
emit a click every time the 
sequencer steps^ thus 
announcing a new digit and 



serving as an audible "pilot 
light/' IC11 and Q3 eliminate 
the zero tone, which you hear 
when the sequencer is 



stepping through unused out- 
puts. 

Speaking of unused out- 
puts, enough are available to 




>} 



i 



^1 ( s % ^ 



Fig. 3. 117 Vac Input power supply for digital to audio decoder. 



allow easy expansion up to 
eight digits, if desired. All 
you need to do is buy a few 
more 16^ open collector 
NAND gates (7401s or 
7403s), and string their 
outputs together in parallel 
with Id, IC2, and IC3. Then 
duplicate the enabling cir- 
cuitry used for tCI, IC2, and 
IC3, using the unused in- 
verters in IC4 and !C8. Con- 
nect the inputs of these 
inverters to sequence genera- 
tor point 4, point 5 and so 
on, depending upon how 
many additional digits you 
want. Remember, though^ 
that these added digits are 
less significant than the first 
three, so connect the biggest 
place digit (100s, lOOOs, 
10,000s, etc.) to ICl. This 
ease of adding (or subtract- 
ing) digits Es why I used lowly 
old open collector logic, as 
opposed to fancier data 
multiplexers. Be sure to 
connect all used sequence 
generator output points to an 
input of ICll, the 8 input 
NAND. Doing this allows the 
vco to turn on for all the 
di^ts you want. Unused ICIl 
gate inputs should be tied to 
+ 5 V (same asa'VMnTTL). 

My last "optional" feature 
is probably not so optional. It 
gives the blind user the ability 
to hear what a number 
sounds like [ust by pushing 
the right combination of 
switches SI through S8. For 
example, a **9" can be heard 
by pushing SI and S8 simul- 
taneously, or a *'4*' by 
pushing S4 alone. Pushing 
any of these buttons does a 
few other things, too. First, it 
removes power from tCl 
through IC3, making all their 
outputs open up, allowing the 
pushed buttons to enter the 
desired number independent- 
ly of the numbers being 
entered from the digital test 
instrument Second, it brings 
one input of ICIl low, 
allowing the vco to function, 
so the tone can be heard. 
Finally, it stops the 555 timer 
from pulsing to allow hearing 
the tone alone. The switch 
marked SO allows hearing the 
zero tone. 



180 



Interfedng 

As it sits, this digital to 
audio decoder will not easily 
connect to every piece of 
digital test equipment, but it 
can be done! If the piece of 
test gear has an output 
connector labeled "BCD out- 
put/' youVe in. Most Heath 
frequency counters are 
usable, but you must solder 
to the circuit board. Connect 
the audio encoder's BCD 
inputs to test equipment's 
data latch outputs. Fig. 2 and 



Photo 3 show how this is 
accomplished for a Heath 
IB1 100 frequency counter. 

Construction 

In that only eleven ICs and 
a few other parts are used, I 
don't think a printed circuit 
board is worthwhile. As to 
the mechanical details, like 
switch placement, I strongly 
urge you to talk it over with 
the person for which the 
audio decoder is intended. 

As to operation, what can 



I really add? I went through 
most of it in the theory and 
optional features sections. 
When power is first applied, 
you should hear a clock every 
Yi second from the speaker, 
three tones after a few clicks, 
and then the same set of 
tones provided the numbers 
on the DVOM, counter, or 
whatever haven't changed- If 
you are in a hurry to try it 
outj as I was, you can take 
the 100s, 10s, and Is input 
lines Al, B2, C4, and D8 and 



tie some high and some low. 
Be careful, though, not to 
exceed 9 on any digit, or the 
results could be a bit con- 
fusing to say the least! 

Although there may not 
be anything in it for you, 
except satisfaction, please 
don*t look at this as "just 
another project." Look at it 
in the light of letting a blind 
person see some of the 
numbers we take for granted. 
Build one for a friend- ■ 




from psge 177 

MY PREDICT ION 

From everything that I can see so 
far, i would suggest that amateur 
radio in the 1980s may be a^most 
entirely a VHF affair, with 50 MHi 
and 144 MHz as our major bands. I 
suspect that Covvan and S-9 may win 
the day with a CB band on 220 MHe, 
since hams seem to be doing very little 
to stop him. This is the chap who 
publfshes CQ Magazine. 

Without any satellite bands to 
mention, and without long-range com- 
munications^ the whole fabric of 
amateur radio wtfj change. About half 
of the active amateurs are ai ready on 
two meters . . . now the other half wiM 
either join them or try stamp collect- 
ing ,, . or computers. 

IT IS NOT TOO LATE 
Since most of the ITU countries 
have not yet formulated their pos^ 
tions on the shortwave bands, we still 
have some time, if we hurry, for ham 
ambassadors to lobby for our hobby. 
Members of the QCWA would seem to 
be ideal ham ambassadors. These are 
the people who made amateur radio 
what it is today and it would seem to 
rest in their hands to make amateur 
radio whatever it is going to be 
tomorrow. 

The QCWA member amateurs 
include a great number of the pioneers 
and innovators — people with the 
drive and enthusiasm to get things 
done. It is not surprising to find that 
many of these same people have 
become top men in the electronics 
industry. As part of their work, many 
of these men travel quite a bit and 
have good opportunities to see the 
heads of foreign countries and put In a 
good word, or perhaps a few thousand 
good words, for amateur radio. A 
little side trip to see the king or 
president of a country will not gen- 
erally hurt business, if I may be guilty 



ED} JO RIAL BY WA YNE GREEN 

of understatement. 

No other group has such an elite 
membership as QCWA — just the type 
of people who could get an entry to a 
kmg and who would be able to sell the 
concept of amateur radio benefitting 
the country. Even if the ARRL 
wanted to spend money on such a 
project rather than their new million 
dollar wing of headquarters, they have 
no one of any stature to send out* 
Since QCWA members are already 
travel ing< with their businesses paying 
the bills, there would be no cost to 
anyone for ambassadors. 

QCWA members who are interested 
in the project should drop me a line 
ar*d get a copy of a newsletter cailed 
"Amateur Radio, the Key to the 
Growth of a Country." There isn't 
much time to lose . . , unless you are a 
confirmed UHF addict and could care 
less about the low bands. 

THE RADIO SHACK 
COMPUTER 

"Most impressive" is my verdict on 
this one. When you see it and have a 
chance to try pt out you'll find it 
difficult not to like. They have packed 
a lot into what looks much like just a 
keyboard — It's the complete com 
puter, with a Z-SO microprocessor, 
BASiC language on a ROM so it is 
right there ready to use as soon as you 
turn on the power, plus enough 
memory to tackie most things you 
might want to do. There is also the 
cassette interface system so all you 
have to do is plug in any ordinary 
cassette recorder to save and reload 
programs or data. 

There are three sockets on the back 
panel of the computer — one for the 
monitor TV set, one for the little 
power supply which comes with it, 
and one for the cassette recorder. 

The price for this? $400 for the 
computer, and $600 for the complete 

package of computer, TV monitor, 









■■- ■' vr- '■■■■■■■' 



Radio Shack's aompf&ts TRSSO Microcomputer System, consisting of a 53-key 
professional- type keyboard and micracomput&r plus regulated power supply, 
computer comroited data cassette recorder, and 12" video display monitor, is 
sultabie for business, educational, and home applications. A vailahle exclusively 
from Radio Shack stores and dealers, nationwide, for $599.95. 



and cassette recorder. Is it a co- 
incidence that this is the same price as 
the PET? 

Since I needed a computer system 
as a prop for a TV commercial I was 
making to advertise Computer mania, I 
borrowed the computer and took it 
down to the TV station. Readers 
around the Boston area may have seen 
me operating it on the commercial, 
programming it to print out a short 
message for Computermania. The gist 
of the commercial was that here is a 
computer which would have cost over 
a million dollars just about ten years 
ago , . . now you can buy one for 
$400 . . , perhaps it is time to look 
into microcomputers for your 
business. 

It's a very good-fooking set and it 
worked like a charm. 

It will be a while before production 
is up to fuil scale on this new system, 
so check into the larger Radio Shack 
stores from time to time. The first few 
production runs may go almost 
entirely by mail order, so you may 
have to buy one just to try it out . . . 
or at least keep an eye on your friends 



in case they buy one. 

The BASIC which comes with the 
system fs an abbreviated version in 4K 
of ROM. They are working on a more 
expanded version and that will 
probably accompany their disk system 
which is scheduled for December. 
Yep, disks are coming . . . starting 
with single density single side, about 
90K of storage. You can be sure this 
wilt grow to double density, double 
sides, etc. 



^ 



QSLsI 




181 



G^rge R. Allen WIHCI 
80 Farmstead Lane 
Windsor CT 06095 



Synthesize 
Yourself! 



-- practical experiments 



Synthesizers are here to 
stay. Synthesizers are 
used in amateur and com- 
mercial transmitters, re- 
ceivers, audio frequency gen- 



erators, test equipment, and a 
multitude of devices for a 
large variety of purposes. 
They are used in applications 
that require the generation of 





h 




OUTPUT FROM 

i^ THE t-UM A 
DSFFERthtt 01 
TWO FHEQUENI 

u 


ND 

f THE 
Cl£S 

! + 1|, 








V 


MMIR 






FILtER OR 
ruNEP CIRCUIT 




? 








\h-U\ 








1 
(« 


( 


.FlUtH OUT &UW, 













a large number of frequen- 
cies. 

Prior to the invention of 
the digital integrated circuit, 
synthesizers were few and far 
between. The technology was 
known, but the necessary 
fundamental building blocks 
were not readily available. 



no oo^MHj 



CRTST*L 
OSCILLATOR 



Mixer 



Fig. h Receiver mixer. 



(t 



Synthesizers were used, but 
they were cumbersome due 
to the large number of com- 
ponents required, and of 
course they were expensive to 
build and maintain. It wasn't 
until the advent of digital 
Integrated circuits that 
synthesizers came into vogue 
because of the fact that 
digital ICs combined a large 
number of functions into a 
simple package. The **ncw" 
synthesizers are simple to 
construct, use few parts, and 
can by built inexpensively. 

This article discusses the 
current generation of fre- 
quency synthesizers and pro- 
vides an overview of the oper- 
ation of the three common 
types of synthesizers in use 
today: the oscillator- mixer 
synthesizer, the period 
synthesizer, and the phase 
locked bop synthesizer. The 
greater portion of this article 
is devoted lo the popular and 
versatile synthesizer, the 
phase locked loop, commonly 
known as the PLL synthe- 
sizer. 

This article also describes 
simple synthesizer circuits 
and simple experiments using 
PLLs. 

Those experimenters who 
are already experienced with 
synthesizers will notice that 
various topics have been 
glossed over or omitted in 
total Those who have never 
worked with synthesizers 
should be able to read this 
article and make the simple 
circuits work. 

Synthesis 

Synthesis, by definition, is 



I" i-^ ■ f^ 



* ^©yr 



if ILTt*5 ft#t 



CirrSTfiL 
O5C1LL*T0fl 



CRYSTAL 
OSCILLATOfl 



f I " FCRTSTiiL 




h^h 



FIUTEB OUT 
111 -til 



r 



r 



t ^ 



5 0CK? 
5 OlO 

S D30 

?! 050 
5.Q6D 

ft nro 
a oeo 
a 0^0 



^out 



15 000 

45 010 
15.0^0 
15030 
15.04a 
15 OSO 
15 D60 

is.oyo 

15 CH30 
15 090 




t I ^ III 

I I , III 

CUTSTALl rP»0« 5<JflO TO SOM m 



T 

I 



I I 

I I 

I I 



T 
I 
I 
r 



lOKWi STf¥kS 



Fig. 2. Transmitter mixer. 



Fig. 3. Crysiai-mixer synthesizer. 



182 



a process that takes building 
blocks and produces a fin- 
ished product. The process 
need not be complex, but 
may be very simple and be 
applied to a variety of appli- 
cations. The average experi* 
menter seldom gives thought 
to the definition of synthesis; 
however, the average experi- 
menter commonly uses pro- 
cesses which fit the defini- 
tion. 

The process of summing 
two voltages to produce a 
third voltage (a process used 
in many pieces of electronic 
equipment} is synthesis, and 
the process of mixing two 
frequencies together to pro- 
duce a third frequency (het- 
erodyning in a receiver) ts 
synthesis. 

Oscillator -Mixer Synthesis 

Fig. 1 is a mixing circuit of 
a simple superheterodyne re- 
ceiver* Frequency Fi (the 
heterodyning frequency) 
mixes with frequency F2 (the 
incoming signaf) to produce a 
frequency in the i-f range. 
This technique is not com- 
monly thought of as syn- 
thesis, but is thought of as 
mixing; however, it is fre- 
quency synthesis. 

In Fig. 2, a variable fre- 
quency oscillator, or vfo, of a 
transmitter is mixed with a 
heterodyning crystal to pro- 
duce an output in a given 
band. In this case, the output 
frequency will be variable and 
is determined by the expres- 
sion, F out ^ Fyfo + f crystal- 
lf the frequency of the vfo 

can be varied from 5,0 to 5.5 
MHz and the mixing crystal is 
10.0 MHz, then the **synthe- 
sized output'' will be in the 
range of 15.0 to 15-5 MHz. 
(Note that mixing produces 
both the sum and the differ- 
ence frequencies, but in this 
example the difference fre- 
quency is filtered out,) 

While a synthesizer of this 
type is very useful and very 
common, it suffers from a 
serious problem — the prob- 
lem of stability. Vfos drift by 
nature, due to temperature 
fluctuations, and are subject 
to frequency variation due to 




Simple single channel synthesizer built on a Continental Specialties breadboard 




3 to 9 MHz synthesizer constructed in breadboard fashion 



vibration and the inadvertent 
bumping of the vfo diaL 
(And, of course, it is difficult 
to reset the dial back to its 
original position once it has 
b^n bumped-) Fig, 3 shows 
an improved version of the 
simple "synthesizer," In this 
example, the vfo is replaced 
with another crystal oscillator 
and a crystal switch. In the 
example given, ten crystals 
spaced 10 kHz apart are 



mixed with the heterodyning 
crystal to produce ten dis* 
Crete frequencies in the 15 
MHz range, 10 kHz apart. 
The spacing of the output 
frequencies is called ''channel 
spacing," and is related to the 
channel spacing of the 'local 
oscillator" crystals. 

The drawbacks to the cir- 
cuit shown in Fig. 3 are very 
obvious. First of all^ eleven 
crystals are needed to pro- 



duce ten frequencies J and 
second, the output frequen- 
cies are limited to discrete 
frequencies or channels. 
Furthermore, all frequencies 
within a given band are not 
covered. From a cost stand- 
point, it would be better to 
use ten crystals at the desired 
frequencies than to use this 
circuit. 

Fig. 4 is an improved ver- 
sion of the synthesizer shown 



183 



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Fig, 4. Twenty frequency crystal-mixer synthesizer. 



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Fig, 5. Varying the frequency of a crystahmixer synthesizer. 



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in Fig. 3. In this example, 
two heterodyning crystals are 
used, F| = 10.000 MHz and 
F2 = 10.100 MH2, Table 1 
shows the output frequencies 
that can be obtained by mix* 
ing the two heterodyning 
crystals with the ten tocal 
oscillator frequencies* 

Note that in this case we 



are using twelve crystals to 
generate twenty discrete fre- 
quencies. At this point we 
have an economical a! tern a* 
tive to the use of twenty 
crystals to generate twenty 
discrete frequencies. We have 
a saving of eight crystals. If 
we add a third heterodyning 
crystal, we can generate 



thirty discrete frequencies 
with ihirteen crystals and 
save ourselves seventeen 
crystals. This process can be 
continued by adding hetero- 
dyning crystals to the point 
where all desired frequencies 
within a given band are 
generated; however, at $5.00 
and up per crystal, the de- 
signer soon reaches the point 
where a crystai-mixing 
synthesizer is not economi- 
cally feasible. This type of 




Test setup at W7HCI used for testing 3 to 9 MHz synthesizer. The scope trace shows ringing and 
noise on the vco signal, due to the random component layout and long lead lengths on the 
breadboard. 



synthesizer is useful in cases 
where it is desirable to gen- 
erate a limited number of 
stable, discrete frequencies in 
a simple manner. 

The other drawback of the 
crystal- mi King type of synthe- 
sizer^ as previously men- 
tioned, is the problem that 
the output frequencies are 
discrete and that all frequen- 
cies within an entire band are 
not covered. Gaps occur in 
the frequency coverage of the 
unit. In many cases, such as 
VHF radiotelephone, this is 
not a serious drawback (since 
operation in the VHF radio- 
telephone bands is chan- 
nelized to begin with); how- 
ever, in the case of high fre- 
quency operation where fixed 
channels are not usedj dis* 
Crete frequency operation can 
present a problem* Fig. 5 
shows a simple cure to permit 
continuous operation in the 
areas between channels. The 
trimmer capacitor Ci , across 
the crystal^ is varied and pro- 
duces a smalt frequency varia- 
tion of the frequency of the 
heterodyning crystal. If the 
channel spacing is small, the 
trimmer can permit coverage 
of all frequencies between 
channels. The addition of this 
trimmer does reduce stability 
a bit, but this reduction in 
stability in most cases is not 
too serious. 

The crystal-mixing type of 



1S4 



synthesizer is commonly used 
in amateur and comnriercial 
HF and VHF equipment; 
however^ il is becoming less 
popular due to the high cost 
of crystals and the availability 
of the phase locked loop. 
Furthermore, some of these 
synthesizers that have been 
on the market in the past 
have suffered from a variety 
of problems and become 
somewhat unpopular. In 
some cases it was possible to 
have several crystals oscillat- 
ing at one time^ producing 
multiple output frequencies. 
(Of course, this problem 
could be put to good use if 
thp^operator desired to trans- 
mil on several frequencies 
simultaneously.) 

Time Period Synthesis 

Time period symhesis, ac- 
cording to some authors, en* 
compasses a variety of tech- 
niqueSp including the phase 
locked loop. In this article, 
however, time period syn- 
thesis will be defined as a 
counting technique that gen- 
erates a waveform with a time 
period proportional to some 
"N|*' number of counts of a 
standard oscillator* As an 
example, consider the crystal 
oscillator in Fig, 6 that feeds 
a digital divide by two 
counter The divide by two 
counter generates one output 
pulse for every two input 
pulses. This is shown graph- 
ically in Fig. 1. This is a 
simple time period synthe- 
sizer, !f the crystal operates 






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at 10 MHz, then the output 
from I his simple synthesizer 
will be 5 MHz. This technique 
is used frequently in crystal 
caJibrators found in many 
pieces of amateur equipment. 
Fig, 8 shows a block diagram 
of a typical calibrator. In this 
block diagram, a 1 MHz oscil- 
lator is fed into either a 
divide by ten or a divide by 
ten followed by a divide by 4, 
The outputs are either 100 
kHz or 25 kHz. If a series of 
digital counters were con- 
nected together lo form a 
four digits divide by N 
counter, as shown in Fig, 9, 
then a versatile time period 
synthesizer could be con- 
structed to produce a large 
number of frequencies. 

One of the drawbacks of 
time period synthesis is that 
switch selection (in the divide 
by N counter) programs the 
number of counts to divide 
by, and the number N is not 



f1 


f2 


fout 


10.000 MHz 


5,000 


15.000 


10.000 MHz 


5.010 


.010 


10.000 MHz 


5.020 


,020 


10.000 MHz 


5.030 


.030 


10,000 MHz 


5.040 


.040 


10.000 M Hi 


5,050 


.050 


10,000 MHz 


5.060 


.060 


10.000 MHz 


5.070 


.070 


10.000 MHz 


5.080 


.080 


1 0.000 M Hz 


5.090 


.090 


10J00 MHz 


5.000 


,100 


10.100 MHz 


5,010 


.110 


10.100 MHz 


5,020 


.120 


10.100 MHz 


5.030 


.130 


10,100 MHz 


5.040 


,140 


10.100 MHz 


5.050 


-150 


10.100 MHz 


5.060 


.160 


10.100 MHz 


5.070 


.170 


10.100 MHz 


5.080 


.180 


10.100 MHz 


5.090 


.190 



Fig. 1h Simple phase hcked hop, 

the frequency. The expres- 
sion for frequency for the 
time period synthesizer is 

fosc 



out 



N 



where fosc is the frequency 
of the standard oscillator. 

Note that the frequency is 
inversely related to the nunri- 
ber N. Table 2 gives a list of 
frequencies for selected 
values of N. 

It is not possible to get 
Standard channel spacing 
when incrementing N, When 
N is changed from 51 to 52, 
the frequency difference or 
channel spacing is 37,707*4 
Hz, but when N is changed 
from 1001 to 1002, the spac- 
ing is 99.701 Hz. The channel 
spacing is not linear, and pro- 
duces low frequencies for 
high values of N (in this case, 
frequencies in the audio 
range)* Synthesizers of this 
type are difficult to use for 
most amateur applications. 

One notable use of this 
type of synthesizer is found 
in the common '*iouchtone" 
generator ICs- These ICs pro- 



vide a fixed series of dividers 
used to divide a master oscil- 
lator down to the proper 
audio frequency. 

The Phase Locked Loop 

The fundamental phase 
locked loop^ as shown in Figp 
10, consists of a frequency 
standard or reference oscrl la- 
tor , a voltage controlled oscil- 
lator, a frequency /phase de* 
tec tor, and a low pass filter. 
In operation^ the frequency 
and phase of the frequency 
standard is compared against 
the output of the voltage 
controlled oscillator. IF ihere 
is a difference in frequency or 
phase, then an output volt- 
age, or error signal, is pro- 
duced by the frequency/ 
phase detector. This output 
voltage is fed back into the 
voltage controlled oscillator 
to change its frequency. This 
fundamental phase locked 
loop is used to synchronize 
two oscillators together, and 
is not commonly used in ama- 
teur equipment in this funda- 
mental form. This simple 
example can, however, be 

Output 



t 


100.000,000 


2 


50,000,000 


10 


10,000,000 


50 


2,000,000 


51 


1,960,784.3 


52 


1,923,076.9 


100 


1,000,000.00 


101 


990,099.01 


102 


980,392.16 


1000 


100,000.00 


1001 


99,900.100 


1002 


99,800.399 


1003 


99,700.897 


9999 


1 ,000.1 


' f^^i, = 


fOOMOQ.OOO Hz (too MHz} 



Table f , 



Tabh 2 



185 




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F/g. 73. Adding a -^N counter to the simple PLL Remote the 
old connection from pin J J of the XR2206 to pin J of the 
MC4044. In this example, switches are set for 01 012-5. 



used as a basis for under- 
standing the PLL and some of 
the problems that occur in 
PLL operation. 

The Reference Oscillator 

The reference oscillatorj or 
frequency standard, for a 
PLL system must be of high 
stability and is usually a 
crystal oscillator. This crystal 
oscillator may be used by 
itself, or it may be used in 
conjunction with a series of 
frequency dividers to produce 
a given output ticquency. In 
the case where a series of 
dividers follov/s the crystal 
oscillator, the reference oscil- 
lator is in itself a "time 
period" synthesizer. The out- 
put of the reference oscillator 
is a determining factor in ihe 
channel spacing of the 
synthesizer, and, in the case 
of the synthesizers discussed 
in this article, is the same as 
the channel spacing. 

Fig. 1 1 shows the circuit 
diagram for a simple refer- 
ence oscillator. In this ex- 
ample, an 8/192000 MHz 
crystal is the frequency deter- 
mining element and is fol- 
lowed by a divide by 8192 
stage. The output of the ref- 
erence oscillator is 1,000 Hz- 
The 7038 integrated circuit 
consists of an oscillator and 
an internal divide by 8192 
counter. 

The Vco 

A volta^ controlled oscil- 



lator, or vco, is a special 
version of a vfo. In a vfo, the 
frequency is changed by man- 
ually moving the rotor of a 
variable capacitor or by man- 
ually moving the slug in a 
variable inductor- In a vco, 
the frequency is changed by 
applying a voltage to a device 
such as a variable capacitance 
diode in an oscillator circuit 
or by changing the bias on a 
multivibrator. A change in 
voltage will produce a changp 
in frequency of the oscillator. 

While the experimenter 
may build a vco from discrete 
components, it is convenient 
to use integrated circuit vcos 
such as the Motorola MC4024 
voltage controlled multivibra- 
tor or the Exar XR'2206 
monolithic function gerh 
erator. 

The Motorola MC4024 
will operate from audio 
frequencies to 25 MHz, pro- 
duc^ a square wave output, 
and has a maximum control 
range of 3,5 to K The 
XR-2206 will operate from 
.01 Hz to 1 MHz, produces 
either square, triangle, or sine 
waves at the output, and has 
a maximum control range of 
1000 to 1. 

The control range of a vco 
(also called the sweep range) 
is defined as the ratio of the 
highest frequency to the 
lowest frequency that can be 
obtained by varying the con- 
trol voltage while keeping all 
external components the 
same. For example, Fig. 11 



shows an XR-2206 mono- 
lithic function generator con* 
figured as a vco to produce 
audio frequencies in a PLL, 
By varying the control volt- 
age in this circuit, the output 
frequency will change from 
about 400 Hz to about 9500 
Hz, for a control range of 
about 23 to L 

The Frequency /Phase De- 
tector 

The frequency /phase de- 
tector is used to compare the 
output of the vco against the 
output from the reference os- 
cillator, A typical frequency/ 
phase cfetector is the Moto- 
rola MC4044, While the inter- 
nal operation of this device is 
somewhat complex, the re- 
suits of what it does are easy 
to see and understand. 

Fig. 1 1 shows an MC4044 
f re q u e n c y / p h ase detector 
connected in a PLL. The low 
pass filter in this circuit is 
used to smooth the output 
and eliminate high frequency 
components in tte output. 

In this example, if the vco 
frequency is greater than the 
reference frequency, then the 
output will be in the range of 
about 2.5 to 5 volts. If the 
frequency is less than the 
reference voltage ^ then the 
output will be in the range of 
2,5 to ,8 volts. 

As the name implies, the 
frequency /phase detector also 
detects phase differences 
between two signals. Consider 
the case where two signals are 
at the same frequency but are 
slightly out of phase with 
each other, in this case, there 
will also be an output voltage 
from the frequency/phase de- 
tector. This output voltage is 
a "phase error" voltage, and 
will remain constant when 
the loop is *'locked/' or in a 
stable condition. When the 
loop is not ** locked," as when 
the frequency of the vco is in 
the process of changing, then 
this error voltage will be 
changing. Note that the error 
voltage may also remain con- 
stant if the loop is unable to 
lock up. 

The Fundamental PLL 

Fig. 11 shows a circuit 



diagram for a simple PLL 
operating in the audio range, 
This circuit is a good circuit 
to use for experimentation, 
since the output is 1 kHz to 9 
kHz in the audio range. A 
pair of earphones may be 
used on the output to deter- 
mine if the circuit is oper- 
ating correctly. An oscillo- 
scope or counter is not need- 
ed to experiment with this 
PLL, 

To use this circuit for ex- 
perimentation, first discon- 
nect the square wave output 
from pin 1 of the MC4024, 
and then connect the +5 V 
and +12 V as shown. Connect 
the earphones to test point A 
through a ,01 uF capacitor. A 
1 kHz tone, rich in har* 
monies, should be heard in 
the earphones. At this time^ 
the output of the vco will be 
at about 9.5 kHz, the idling 
frequency of the vco. Now 
connect the earphones to the 
output of the vcOp as shown 
on the schematic. Connect 
the square wave output of the 
MC4024 as shown. The out- 
put of the vco will change 
from 9.5 kHz to 1 kHz. Note 
that it is possible in this 
example for the PLL to lock 
to a frequency that is a multi- 
ple of 1 kHz, since a PLL can 
lock to a harmonic or sub- 
harmonic of the reference fre- 
quency. This property is use^ 
fuf for some applications; 
however, it would not be 
useful for amateur applica* 
tions such as a two meter 
PLL, 

It is difficult to explain 
the reasons for harmonic or 
sub-harmonic locking in 
simple terms. From a prac- 
tical standpoint, this type of 
locking can occur due to poor 
design, or if the tuning range 
of the vco is too great. In this 
example, the potential prob- 
lem of harmonic or sub- 
harmonic locking could be 
eliminated by limiting the 
tunifig range of the PLL. A 
good rule of thumb is to limit 
the tuning range of the PLL 
to 3.5 to 1 or less. 

Readers who wish to go 
into the fine details of the 
operation of frequency/phase 



1 



H 


C B A 


1 


1 


2 


10 


3 


11 


4 


10 


B 


10 1 


6 


110 


7 


111 


8 


10 


9 


10 1 



Tabfe 3, 

deLectors, vcos, and PLLs in 
general are referred lo refer- 
ence 1. This reference gives a 
detailed, authoritative explan- 
ation of PLLs. 

An "N" Channel PLL Syn- 
thesizer 

The previous "simple 
PLL" might be called a single 
channel synthesiser, since its 
output is on a single channel 
and cannot be varied from 
that single channel. A more 
versatile synthesizer is shown 
in the block diagram in Fig. 
12. This is a one digit ^^N" 
channel synthesizer where N 
can range from 1 to 9, The 
PLL is the same as the simple 
PLL, except that a divide by 
N counter has been placed 
between tlie vco and the fre- 
quency /phase detector. In 
operation, the PLL will in- 
crease the frequency of the 
vco such that the output of 
the vco divided by N is equal 
to the reference frequency. 
Thus the output of the vco is 
'*N" times the reference, 
where N is an integer If we 
modify Fig. 11 by adding a 
divide by N counter as shown 
in Fig» 13, we will have an N 
channel synthesizer where the 
theoretical output range 
would be 1 kHz to 9 kHz in I 
kHz steps, when N goes from 
1 to 9. 

As previously mentioned, 
PLLs can lock to the wrong 
harmonic if the tuning range 
of the PLL is too greaL In 
this example^ the tuning 
range of the PLL is about 9.5 
to L The problems with the 
tuning range can be demon- 
strated by performing some 
very simple experiments with 
the **N** channel PLL. Again, 
these experiments can be per- 
formed with the use of ear- 
phones* A scope or counter is 
not required^ but may be 
used if desired. 



The 74192 divide by N 

counter can be programmed 
in BCD format to provide an 
N of 1 to 9. To program a 
number, first set all inputs to 
by grounding. A number is 
programmed by setting a "V 
into an input, according to 
Table 3, A one is set by 
connecting the input to +5 V 
through a 1 k resistor. 

To experiment with this 
simple PLL, first connect the 
earphones as shown. Next, 
program a 1 , to get a 1 kHz 
tone, as shown in Fig. 14, A 1 
kHz tone will be heard. Next^ 
program a 2, 3j and 4j one at 
a time. Tones of 2, 3, and 4 
kHz will be heard. This 
simple PLL should lock up 
for these values of N on the 
correct multiples of 1 kHz, 
but will probably not lock up 
for some other values of N, 
For example, when N ^ 5, the 
PLL may lock up on 1 kHz, 
and when N = 7, it may lock 
up on 3 kHz. This is an 
example of a PLL with too 
great a range. Changing R^ to 
a value of Ik will limit the 
range of the loop to about 4 
to 1 , just slightly greater than 
the recommended range. With 
this limit imposed, the loop 
will lock properly in the de- 
sired range of 1 to 4 kHz, An 
N of greater than 4 will give 
an output of about 4,7 kHz, 
and the loop will not be 
locked. In some cases, it may 
be necessary to wire in ex- 
ternal logic or put limits on 
switches to prevent the ''dial- 
ing in" of non-allowed values 
of N on the switches and the 
resultant locking to wrong 
frequencies. 

Other Design Considerattons 
for PLLs 

While it is not possible in a 
short article to give complete 
design information and de- 
scribe all design considera- 
tions for a PLL^ there are 
some key points which must 
be mentioned. 

In the general description 
of the components of the 
PLL, the filter was mentioned 
only briefly. The filter is an 
important part of the PLL, 
and must be chosen such that 
the loop locks up quickly but 



*o- 



i 



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^ 



a&- 



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^ 



i 






P P- 



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":* 



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Fig. 14. Examples of programming ifie -i-/V counter. 



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Fig. J 5. HFPLL 



still fillers out all high fr^ 
quency components. If the 
filter is not correct, the loop 
could be too slow to respond, 
not operate correctly (pro- 
ducing distorted waveforms), 
or not lock properly. The 
value of the capacitor in the 
low pass filter may be deter- 
mined experimenially by 
observing the control voltage 
on an oscilloscope. C\ should 
be chosen just large enough 
so that the control voltage is 
pure dc with very little ripple. 
If a scope is connected to pin 
8 of the MC4044 and Ci is 
removed, the effects of poor 
filtering can be observed. 
High frequency comp)onents 
will be observed on the vco 
control line, and the output 
waveform will be distorted. 
(Reference 1 should be con- 
sulted for detailed filter re- 
quirements.) 

Another consideration for 
a PLL is the stability of the 
oscillator. If the oscillator 
drifts, then the output will 
drift according to the fol- 
lowing expression: foutpul 

drift = N X ffeference drift- 
For example^ if the reference 
drifts by +10 Hz and N = 4, 
then the output will drift by 
+40 Hz, 

Noise on the vco line can 
sometimes cause problems. 
These problems can be re- 
duced by designing the vco so 
that a relatively large change 



in control voltagE is required 

to produce a relatively small 
percentage frequency change. 
In addition, it is important to 
sprinkte bypass capacitors 
liberally from the +5 V, +12 
V, or other voltage lines to 
ground, A good practice is lo 
place a .01 capacitor from the 
+V terminal of each IC to 
ground, keeping the leads as 
short as possible. 

Rf can be a problem with 
PLLs, If rf sneaks into the 
wrong place within a PLL, 
the PLL can fail to lock or 
can lock at the wrong place, 
Ihe vco can cease to operate, 
or a myriad of other prob- 
lems can result For these 
reasons, it is important to 
shield a PLL that is used with 
a transmitter, to prevent rf 
from the transmitter from 
getting back into the PLL 
synthesizer. 

It is also important to re- 
member that PLLs have 
square waves, rich in har 
monies, coming out of the 
reference as well as the divide 
by N circuitry. These square 
waves can cause interference 
in nearby receiving equip- 
ment. It is important to 
shield a PLL synthesizer to 
prevent interference to other 
equipment 

A Synthesizer for the HF 
Bands 

The synthesizer examples 



187 



1 *^^v*>^^ — r-\ I 

4 — * — • — i-^ ^'tT 




>r0 HC4044. Ptr^ 3 



OII£S 






previously described operated 
in the audio range, a range 
ideally suited for experimen- 
tation. Synthesizers of 
general interest to the ama- 
teur may lie in the HF region. 
This section will discuss HF 
synthesizers. 

In designing a synthesizer 
for HF use, two criteria must 
first be defined: 

1 . Output frequency range; 

2. Channel spacing. 

Consider an example 
where a synthesizer is re- 
quired to operate with an 
output in the range of 3 to 9 
MHz in 1 kHz steps. In this 
case, our PLL will have a 
range of about 3 to 1. The 
channel spacing would t>e 1 
kHz, so the output of the 
reference oscillator must be 1 
kHz. In all "direct" PLLs, a 
PLL where the output is used 
directly without mixing or 
multiplication of the output, 
the channel spacing is the 
same as the reference fre- 
quency* For other types of 
synthesizers, such as VHF 
synthesizers (where the out- 
put of the PLL is fed into a 
multiplier stage), the refer- 
ence frequency is determined 

by the expression, freference 
= (channel spacing)/(total 
multiplication in multiplier 
stages). The range of this PLL 
synthesizer is to be from 3 to 
9 MHz. Converting these 



Fig, 16. HF synthesizes 

numbers to kHz, we get 3000 
to 9000 kHz; thus, for 1 kHz 
channel spacing, N would 
have to range from 3000 to 
9000. As can be seen, we 
require four digits for N. 
Thus, our divide by N 
counter wotild be a fourdj|jt 
divide by N counter. 

Fig. 15 shows a block dia- 
gram for this PLL. Since the 
formula for a PLL is fout ^ ^ 
X frefercncei ^^^ since N can 
be any number from 1 to 
9999 in this example, it 
seems likely that switches 
could be set so that N is 
outside of the desired range 
of 3000 to 9000. If N is set 
below the desired range^ the 
vco will idle, but it will not 
lock at the lower limit of the 
vco. Likewise, if N is set 
above the desired range, then 
the vco would run at this 
upper limit. In some cases, a 
value of N outside the range 
can cause a PLL to lock on an 
incorrect frequency. Thus, it 
is a good idea to limit the 
allowable switch positions 
either electronically or 
mechanically. In the example 
shown in Fig, 16, the most 
significant digit is hardwired 
to a 7, so this synthesizer is 
electronically limited to the 
range 7000 to 7999, This 
limit is arbitrary, and may be 
changed if desired. If the ex- 
perimenter wishes^ the most 
sigpific^mt digit could be 



varied in the same manner as 
the other three digits. 

Fig, 16 is a circuit diagram 
of a 7.000 to 7.999 MHz 
synthesizer. This synthesizer 
can be breadboarded in an 
evening, and should work the 
first time it is turned on. 
Each digit is programmed in 
BCD in the same manner as 
the simple audio PLL, except 
that the first digit is hard- 
wired to a seven and does not 
change. As previously men- 
tioned^ the number 7 was 
chosen arbitrarily and may be 
changed The vco in this PLL 
is a Motorola MC4024, which 
generates a square wave out- 
put. If a sine wave output 
were desired, then either a 
low pass filter would have to 
be placed on the output of 
the vco (to eliminate all fre- 
quencies above 7.999 MHz, 
for example), or a different 
vco would have to be used. 

Note that this synthesizer 
radiates a lot of rf noise, so 
expect some possible inter- 
ference in nearby receiving 
equipmenL 

The frequency output of 
this synthesizer may be 
measured on a counter^ or its 
signal may be heard on a 
communications receiver. The 
sound of the sign^il ^ heard 
on a communications receiver 
wilt not be pure, due to the 
fact that this PLL uses a 
simple loop filter, which 



allows some inherent modula- 
tion of the signal. Further* 
more, the PLL divider stages 
and reference will radiate, 
causing noise in the receiver 
Shielding will improve the 
sound of the signal, but will 
not make it perfect 

The 74123 is a monos table 
multivibrator and is provided 
to lengthen the reset pulse 
generated by the divide by N 
circuitry. When the divide by 
N circuitry counts to the pro- 
grammed value, a reset putse 
Is used to reset the counters 
so that they may start 
counting agiin. For the 
74192 ICs, this reset pulse 
must be at least 20 nano- 
seconds long to insure proper 
resetting During this 20 ns 
reset period, the counters ar* 
not counting- At 7.5 MHz, the 
time from one cycle of the 
vco to the next would be 1 30 
ns. If this time period from 
one cycle to the next of the 
vco is iess than twice the reset 
time (in this case 40 ns), a 
missed count will occur, 
causing the output frequency 
to be off by one (in the least 
significant digit). This holds 
true in cases where the vco 
generates a square output. In 
cases where the vco generates 
sine waves to other wave- 
forms, the period of the vco 
may have to be greater than 
the reset time by a factor of 4 
or mone. 

If a missed count does 
occur, circuitry can be added 
to automatically compensate 
for the missing count. 

Summary 

This article has described 
the operation of synthesizers 
and has given simple circuits 
for experimentation. It is not 
meant to be the last word in 
synthesizers^ but is meant to 
whet the appetite of the ex- 
perimenter. The experimenter 
is encouraged to read the 
references given to gain a 
greater comprehension of the 
subjecL ■ 

References 

Phase-Locked Loop Data Book, 
Motorola, Inc., 1973. 

Instruction Manusf for the 
SYN'if Synthesfzef^ VHF Engi- 
neering, Binghamton NY 13902. 



188 



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mOMISE Ainrthing, 




But GIFT 




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. . . time to start to plan your 
hoUday gift giving and hope that the 
gift you select is the right size and 
shape and color for the receiver as well 
as the right price for your pocketbook 
. . . You're reading 73 now . . . You 
know what a big, thick informative 
magazine it is . . , And there will be no 
size, shape or color problem . . . The 
price is right too! Twelve issues for 



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subscriptions too . . . Only $14 per 
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and only $12 per year for the third 
gift sub. Think about it, all those 
articles, projects and Wayne's provoca- 
tive editorials to boot. And all those 
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Social Ei/ents 



ERIE PA 

S£PT 25 
The 2nd Annual Erie HamJam will 
be held Sunday,. September 25, 1977 
at Rainbow Gardens, Waidameer Park- 
Door prizes, flea market, forums, large 
indoor faciiities. For more informa- 
tion write Radio Assocation of Erie, 
ITK.. PO Box 844. Erie PA t65l2. 

NEW BERLIN IL 
SEPT 25 

The Sangamon Valley Radio Cltib 
wil! hold its Second Annual Hamfest 
on Sunday, September 25, 1977 at 
the Sangamon County FairgroundSi 
New Berlin, lltinois, 16 miles wast of 
Springfield. Indoor display area and a 
covered pavilion. Food, refreshments, 
exhibits and ladies' activities. Ovemite 
camping on grounds. Tickets Si 
advance; $1,50 at gate. First prize-- 
WilsKi HT. Talk-in 146-28/88 md 
SZ Info: Carole ChurchiH WB9QWR. 
622 Magnolia, Rochester IL 62563. 

BRCM3KLYN NY 
OCTOBER 
The Kings County Repeater Asso- 
ciation of Brooklyn, New Yofk, 
aiiru>urK%s the formation of Us second 
Novice class licensing course (theory 
and code} to begin in October, Con- 
tact Carl Weintrayb W2YHX, 629 
Avenue 'T", Brooklyn MY 11 223 for 
full details. 

WILLOW GROVE PA 
OCT 1 

The Mid-Atlantic States VHF 
Conference will be held on Satyrday, 
October 1, 1977 at the Treadw<jy Inn 
on Easton Road (Route 611, Exit 27 
of the Pennsyivarnia Turnpike) in 
Willow Grove, Pennsylvania pn the 
day before Hamarama 77 (at rwarby 
Warrington, Pennsyh^anraK The 
conference will be an alJ day VHF 
program moderated by prominent 
VHFers. Advance registration is $2. 50 
(includes admission to Hamarama 77 
on Sunday). Cocktail hour (cash bar) 
and get-together at 6:30 pm. Buffet 
dinner at 7:30 pm is $8.00. Special 
rates for rooms overnight. For 
advance registration contact Ron 



wf)a\ do you 
gii^ the man 
who has 
d^crything? 



Sam ^0t 223 



WhitsB^ WA3AXV, Chairman, PO Box 
353. Southampton PA 18966, phone 
{215) 355-5730. Advance registration 
must be received by September 28, 
1977, Indicate motel registration 
forms required. 

HAM DEN CT 
OCT 1 

The Ofcroberfir^ Flea Market and 
Auction will be held October K 1977 
(r^in date OcL 8). The event, spon- 
sored by tbe WE LI Amateur Radio 
Club (WAIHRC), will be held at 
Radio Towers Park, Ben ham Street, 
Hamden, Connecticut* Free admls- 
si on, vendor spaces are SS/ea, Talk -in 
on 52 direct or 01 /6T More informa- 
tion call Doug WA1TUT (203) 
389-6458. 

MEMPHIS TN 
OCT 1-2 

The Memphis Hamfest, b»gger and 
better than the 4,500 who attended 
last year, will tie held at State Tech- 
mcal Institute, F-40 at Macon Road, 
on Saturday and Sunday, October 1 
and 2, Demonstrations, displays, 
MARS meetings, flea market, ladies' 
flea market tooE HtKpitality Room, 
informal dinners, XYL entertainment, 
many outstandir»g prizes. Dealers and 
dEStributon wetcomse. For further 
information contact Harry Simpson 
W4SCF, PO Box 27015, Memphis, 
Tennessee 38127* 

CiPAFt RAPIDS lA 
OCT 2 

The Cedar Valley Amateur Radio 
Club annual Hamfest will be held 
Sunday, October 2, 1977. Top prizes 
are Atlas 21 OX Xcvr, Wilson 1402 SM 
HfT. Heathkit HW-8 QRP CW Xcvr, 
Clegg FM-76 Xcvr, plus much more. 
Technical talks featuring Doug 
DeMaw W1 FB. Manulactyrers and 
dealers welcome. Talk-In on 
146.16/J6. 146.52, 3,970, and 223.5 
MH2. Advance tickets ST50, S200at 
the door. Write CVARC Hamfest, Box 
994, Cedar Rapids I A 52406. 

NEWPORT NH 
OCT 2 

Autumnfest, the first annual ham- 
fest of the Connecticut Valley FM 
Assoclatlori, will be held on October 
2, 1977, at the Community Center. 
Belknap Ave., off Rt- 10, north end of 
the Common. Flea market opens at 9 
am — auction at 2 pm. Program 
includes antenna gain contest, fox 
hunt on 52 simplex, frequency and 
modutaijon checks by WIRNZ, and 
talks and demonstrations throughout 
the day. Donation: SI. 50 in advance 
- S2.00 at the door. Talk-En on 16/76 
or on 52 simplex. 

WARRINGTON PA 
OCT 2 

The Mt Airy VHF Radio Club (the 
Ptekrats) are holding "Hamarama 77" 
at the Bucks County Drive- In Theater, 



Route 611 lEaston Road), Wamng- 
ton. Pennsylvar^ia on Sunday, October 
2, 1977, 8 am to 4 pm rain or shine. 
Registration SI. 50, tail gat if*g 
S2.00/space (bring your own tabled 
Talk in via W3CCX/3 on 52-525 and 
146.B2, WR3ACD on 222.98/224.58. 
WR3ADS on 147.63/147.03, and 
WR3AHCon 147,60/147.00, Advance 
registration to the Mid Atlantic States 
VHF Conference hcludes admission 
to Hamarama. For information 
contact Ron Whitse! WA3AXV. 
Chairman, PO Box 353. Southampton 
PA 1B966, phone (215) 365^5730. 

BERRIEN SPRINGS Ml 
OCT 2 

The Blossom I and annual fall Sv^^p- 
Shop will be held Sunday, October 
2 at the Berrien County Youth Fair- 
grounds, Berrien Springs, Mich- 
igan. Large and convenient facilities, 
prizes, refreshments, and fun. Open all 
night for setup. Table space restricted 
to radio and electronic items. Advance 
ticket donatK>n SLSO. Tables $2. 
Talk-in 22/82 and 94. Write John 
Sulltran, PO BoK 345, St, Joseph Ml 
49085. Make checks payabie to 
Blossom I and HamfesL 

EAST RUTH6RF0BD Hd 
OCT 8 

The Knight Raiders VHF Club, 
K2DEL, presents its world famous 
Auction & Flea Market to be held at 
Sl Joseph's Church of East Ruther- 
ford, New Jersey, Saturday, October 

8, 1977 beginning at 10 am. Free 
admission — freeparkirvg. Flea market 
tables (in advance) &5 full tat>1e, S3 
half tabte; (at door1 S6 fulf table, 
$3.50 Naif table. Dii^ctions: take Rt, 
t? north from Rt. 3 to East Ruther 
ford, exit onto Pater son Plank Road, 
follow to traffic light with Diner on 
li^ corner, make sharp right, follow 
far one block, at fight you will see St. 
Joseph's Church on your right, make 
right turn at comer and enter parking 
loL For further information call: Bob 
Kovaleskj (210) 473-7113, evenings 
only. Talk-in on 146.52. Send reserva 
tions and make checks payable to: 
Knight Raiders VHF Club Inc, PO 
Box 1054, Passaic NJ 07055 (reserva^ 
tions close October 1). 

SHREWSBURY MA 
OCT 3-9 

The Heart Fund Hamboree (all 
proceeds to be gtven to the Heart 
Fur>d^ will be hetd on October 8 and 

9, 1977, at Simeon's Park on Route 9 
irt Shrewsbury MA. Pfogram includes 
door prices, trophteSi special prizes 
and emertainment. For advance 
tickets send Si. 50 donation (orders 
must be received tjy SepL 15) — $2 
donation at gate. Senior cfttzens and 
children 12 years or under free. For 
dealer space and ticket information 
write: Central Mass. 2'Way Radio 
Assoc, P.O, Boi< 154. Northboro MA 
01532. 

SYRACUSE NY 
OCT 8 

The Radio Amateurs of Greater 
Syracuse presents the Syracuse Ham- 
fest* October Q, 1977 from 9 am to 5 



pm at the Syraci^e Auto Auction, 
Route n, Nedrow, New York. Easy 
access from Route 81,5 miles south 
of Syracuse. Food available aH day at 
reasonable prices. Large exhibitor area 
and flea market under cover. Exhibi- 
tors: SI 3.00 (includes one B-toot 
space, 8- foot table, two chairs and 
admission to hamfest), For further 
information; general info - RAGS 
Hamfest, Box 88, Liverpool NY 
13088; exhibitors - Dale Mecomber 
WB2FJC, Box 87, Skaneatdes Falls 
NY 13153. 

VONKERS W 
OCT 9 

The Yonkers Amateur Radio Club 
is holding ''Su(>er Hamfest 77" on 
October 9, 1977 (rain date Oct. 16) 
from 9 am to 5 pm at Redmond Field, 
Cooke Avenue in Yonkers. Manufac- 
turers' displays, door prizes, raffles, 
refreshments and a general auction are 
all in store. Buyers Si, seffers S3 — 
bring youf own table, Talk-tn 
146:265, 146.865, 146.52 simpleic 
For further information corrtact Doug 
McArtin WA2AUJ. 411 Bellevue Avfe,, 
Yonkers NY 10703, (914i 423 0S15. 

WINDSOR LOCKS CT 
OCT 14-16 

The Region 1 Air Force MARS 
Convention will be held on October 
14, 15, 16, 1977 at the Howard 
Johnson's Conference Center, Center 
Street Exit ^91, Windsor Locks, Con- 
necticut 73 publisher Wayne Gneen 
will be guest speaker, 

SAN MATEO CA 
OCT 1516 

The Greater Bay Area Hamfest and 
ARRL Pacific Division Convention 
will be a combined event this year 
held on Saturday and Sunday, Octo- 
ber 1 5 and 16, at the Royal Coach Inn, 
centrally located on the San Francisco 
Peninsula just off the intersection of 
U.S, 101 and Route 92 in San Mateo. 
For more informatk^n contact the 
Greater Bay Area Hamfest, Bo^c 751, 
San Mateo CA 94401 . 

TAYLOR Ml 
OCT 16 

The Repeater Association of Down- 
river Amateur Radio (R.A.D.A.R.) 
Hamfest will be held on October 16, 
1977, at the Kennedy High School 
located in Taylor, Michigan, on North- 
line Road, east of Telegraph (U.S. 24), 
Door prizes and food. Admission 
SZOO/YU free. Reserved table* SI. 
Open 9 MT\ until 3 pm. Talk in will bm 
on 52-52, 34 94, 93-33, For further 
info write: R.A,D.A.R.,^ Inc., PO Sox 
1023,Southgate, Michigan 48195, 

ISLIPNY 
OCT 16 

Hamfest and Giant Swap & Shop 
sponsored by LIIVIARC, the Long 
Island Mobile Amateur Radio Club, 
will be held on Sunday, October 16, 
1977, at the tslip Speedway, Islip, 
New York. Gates open at 9:30 am to 
4 pm. General admi^k>n ST50 (wives^ 
children and sweethearts, free). Ex- 
hibitors and swappers S2.50 per cw 



190 



space. Featurrng: amateur radio^ C6, 
ajmpuier, amateur television, satei- 
lite, ARRL info, theory contest, 
LIMARC lune-up clinic, awards and 
door prizes. Located on Route 111, 
Iflip Avenue, one block south of Exit 
43 of the Southern State Parkway; 
trucks, camp©^ and trailers use the 
Long Island Expressway Exit 56, Rte. 
lit, south to the speedway. For more 
information; Hank Wener WB2ALW, 
days (2 12 J 35&0606, nights (516* 
48^4322. 

VALPARAISO IN 
OCT 16 

The new Annual Vaipo Tech 
Ham test and Fleamarket is Sunday; 
October 16, T977, 7 am to 3:30 pm, 
on the Valparaiso Technical Institute 
campus, located on Lincoln way (US 
130) at Yellowstone Road, west of 
downtown Vajpafaifo, Indiana Held 
on the day after Valpo Tech Home- 
coming. Prestigious electronics school 
offering large storerooms of surplus 
lest instruments, digHat equipment, 
computer circuits, cransniitter com- 
ponents^ TV equipment, Simicon- 
ductoit, and much more, at give-sway 
prices. Everything must go to make 
room for new labs. No charge for 
setup space. Room inside in case of 
rain. Houriy drawings beginning at 8 
am for prizes. Main drawing at 2 pn>. 
Talk-in on 146.34 MHz. Tickets Si. 50 
advance, 52.00 at the door. For ad- 
vance tickets send S1.50 each and an 
SASE to Dale E. Smiley WB9SFF, 
Operations V-P, Valpo Tech Alumni 
Association, Box 490, Valparaiso, 
Indiana 46383. 

WAKEFIELD MA 
OCT 22 

The Quanapowitt Radio A^ocla- 
tlon will hold its annual auction in St. 
Joseph's Parish Hall, Wakefield MA on 
Saturday, OcL 22, 1977, Doors open 
at 10 am^ auction starts at 1 1 am, Ter> 
percent commission, no mini mums, 
Talk4nonl46.52. 

GAITHERSBURG MO 

OCT 23 

The Foundation for Amateur Radio 
will hold its annual hamfest at the 
Gaithersburg Fairgrounds, Garthers- 
bur^ Maryland^ on Sunday, October 
23, 1977. Featured is a large flea 
market, food service, exhibits, ladies' 
events, supervised children's program, 
and many prizes. Main events are all 
indoors. Picnic grounds and free park- 
ing available: will be held rain or 
shine; participation fee ts S2.00; sales 
space for flea mar ket is S5.00each on 
a first come basis: commercial ex- 
hibitors $10.00 each, with pre- 
registration required prior to October 
20th. For more information^ wfite or 
call Hugh Tumbull W3A6C, 6903 
Rhode Isiarnf Avenue, College Park, 
Maryland 20740, telephone (301) 
927-1797, 

FORT LAUDERDALE FL 

OCT 29 30 

The "International" Pan-American 

Ham/ Ex posit ion Jamboree will be 

held on October 29 and 30, 1977, 

Welcome: C8, ham and marine. For 



further inform ation contact: Broward 
Amateur Radio Club, Capt S, f. 
"Red" Crise (Show Chairman) 
WA4ZRW, 3701 State Road 84, Fori 
Lauderdale FL 33312. 

PLYMOUTH IN 
OCT 30 

The Radio and Electronics Swap 
and Shop< sponsored by the Marshall 
County Amateur Radio Club, will he 
held on Sunday, October 30, 1977, at 
the Plymouth. Indiana National Guard 
Armory, located at 1220 West 
Madison Street, from 8 am to 5 pm. 
Free tables, no charge for setup. 
Tickets $2 at door- Food, drink and 
door prizes. Talkin on 146,07-67 and 
14B.52 simplex^ For funher informa 
tion contact Wayne Zehner WA91MM, 
Rt, 3. Box 526, Plymouth IN 46563. 

CLEARWATER BEACH FL 
NOV 19-20 

The Florida Gulf Coast Amateur 
Radio Council is holding its 2nd 
annual convention on November 19 
and 20; 1977 at the Sheraton Sand 
Key Hotel on Oearwater Beach FL, 
Official attendance at our last affair 
was placed in excess of 2200, and this 
year we expect to double that number 
as we increase the number of activities 
and size of the convention. For more 
information contact: Florida Gulf 
Coast Am^ateur Radio Council Inc^ 
PO Box 157, Clearwater FL 33517. 

ELLICOTTCITYMD 

NOV 27 

The Columbia Amateur Radio 
Association ^CARA) wilt hold its 
CAR A Hamfest on November 27, 
1977, at the Ellicoti City Armory in 
Ellicott City, Maryland. Pro-am 
includes exhibits, flea market, prizes, 
and refreshments. All indoors. No 
tailgating. Talk-in on 147.99/39, 
146.16/76, 146.52/52. For more info 
contact CAR A, PC Box 850, Colum- 
bia MD 21044. 

HAZEL PARK Ml 
DEC 4 

The Haze! Park Amateur Radio 
Club is holding their 12lh annual 
Swap & Shop on December 4, 1977^ 
at the Hazel Park High School. Ad- 
mii^on is SI. 00 at the door. Main 
prize tickets are available from Robert 
Numerick W88ZPN. 23737 Couzens, 
Hazel Park Ml 48030. Reserve table 
space is available f rom WB8ZPIM. 








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DENVER, COUOBADO 80227 



NEW! 
A $34.9S 

Meter Calibrator! 



A quality voit^hm calibrator at a break- 
througfH pricel Wtiy put off calibration of 
your VOM, VTVM^ or digital multimeief? 

Here's what you get: 

• Check DC volts at 0.100 V, 1.000 V, 

and 10.000 V 

• Up lo 0.02% accuracy on volts 

• Check ohms at lOOH, Ik, 10k, 100k, 
and 1 meg. 

• Up to 0.1 % accuracy on ohms 
Battery powered, uses 2-9 V batteries 
(r^ot maluded) 

Uses hybrid IC precision reference 

Oniy $34,95 each. Please add $1,50 
postani^ CA residents add $2.10 tax. 

Gary McClellan and Co, Box 2085 

„,ft 1001 W.lmperiaJ Hwv, 

^iw La HabiaCA9Q63l 



INSTRUCTOGRAPH 
MORSE CODE 



ATLAS 350XL DENTRON MLA 2500 WILSON HTs REPEATERS 



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Wilson 



the ancemna 
specialists co. 



^fii^ ATLAS 



DerilforL. 



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i£mw^ 



Make your selection 
from the best of top na- 
tional brands. Choose 
from dozens of models 
and a variety of equip- 
ment to handle any- 
thing from 160 meters 
to 1296 MHz. Products 
like the Atlas 350XL. 
Wilson HTs, Mosely 
Tri-bander. Clegg FM- 
DX. FM-76, Mark 3. 

TT'2. Micro-modufe VHP and UHF IW |^\\A/I A 
converters and transverters. Re- I llx^ W ! g\ 

peaters. Po\«er supplies. And much more. 
For details on this new supersales service, 

800-233-0250, in Pa. oUl bKObivNI wt 

call (717) 299-7221 collect 
Or visit the new Clegg 

re^aolYOUR Wm NEEDS. 

Centerville Road, Lancaster, 
Pa. 17603. 



NEW 



TO FILL /ILL 



riefl^ 



C3 



Advanced technology in ad Ion! 

ATLAS 350XL DENTRON MLA 2500 CLEGG MARK 3 TT-2 



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Since 1924 In^ructograph has serviced the 
world with the most complete equipment ever 
de^visi^ for learning Cominentat code. You 
hsve complete control of $etiding & feceiving 
AT ANY SPEED YOU DESIRE while ma* 
chme is running, without changing tapes 4not 
cassettesL A complete course for beginners 
incU machine, 10 double sided tapes. I<ey. 
manual, built-in speaker. Nothing else to buy. 
$98.50 plus UPS 121b. deL chg. Add 6% S.T. 
for Cali^ deU For catalog on 45 advanced 
tapes write: Instructograph Co. Bok 5032 
Dept, 3, Glandale. CA 91201. (213)246-3902 
or 246-2250- 



MORSE CODE 
INSTRUCTOGRAPH 



KAUFMAN BALUN 



water ti^t 



BALUN 




t-1 impedance match 

For di^oles, b^ams, inverted *'V*\ 
and Qitad."* 

• Center insulator with BALUN $13.50 

• Center insulator without BALUN 
$9.50 

• Dragon Fly antenna construction sheet 
and drawing $2.00 

postpaid USA 

Patent No. 
D219106 



3KwPEP 
4 Ounces 
Qt Ferrite 



KAUFMAN INDUSTRIES 
603-424-2358 
3 SHORT ST 

REEDS FERRY NH 03054 



K€ 



SCR 1000 



Spec Comm 
Reoeater/Duplexet 

PROS F.«/ Factory 




Sdmt 
P&uk 



Rifim&M 



, , . . Qptionaf Cabmet $130MQ 

Let s face it - your repeater group's success or failure hinges on the QuaHty and 

Reliability of your "Ma chine" I That's why the engineers at Spec Comm dedicated 

themselves to the production of the finest repeater available on the amateur market. The 

SCR 1000 has been conservativefy designed for years of troubte-free operation, and every 

consideration has been given to operator convenience and accessory Interfacing.' Features itke full 

meterifig lighted status indfcators, full front panel control of every important repeater operating parameter, and accessory jacks for 

autopatch, xmtr. remote control, etc. And audio so good and so fuEl, your 30 watts will sound like 1001 Think about it and think about 

^l""^!,?^ I^^.^"''7!^^L t ^/cfoon'2'^ Repeater is a sound investment in your group's future, and they'll be thanking you for years to 
come.^ ouio ractory Uirsct only^ Ipo-yy.yo, 



SEND FOR BROCHURE 



Don't maks a mistake — your grQup deserves tKe fmestf 




.30 Watts 



Custom 'Mods' Available: '9L\ 8 Pole Rcvr. Filter, 
Hi/Lo Power, Multi-Freq.,etc. — Inquire. 




Specifications 

RF Output 

Infinite VSWR proof 

Sensitivity 0.3uV/20dB Qt. 

Selectivity -SdB @ i5,5 kHz; 

^58dB@±15kHz; 

^90de @ ±30 kHz. 
(Sharper 8 Pole FItr. Available) 
Desense/Overioad . . , W/luV de- 
sired signal, desense just begins @ 
approx. 50,000uV @ ±800kH2. 
Spurious Response , . ,-70dB min. 



FEATURES 

O FulJ Metering of critical levels, 
n Front Panel Controls for timers & AF 
levels. 



D Lighted push^suttons for control /test 

functions & status indicators 
estate of the Art CMOScontrof logic Bl 

timers — IMo Relays! 
D Built-in IDer — field programmable. 

Fully adjustable speed, pitch, time, 

etc. 
n Exclusive Spec Comm MOSFET/Hot 

Carrier Diode rcvr, front end — greatly 

reduces 'desense' & IM problems f 
DBuilt*in AC Supply w/instant btry. 

switchover for emergency pwr. 
□Supplied with .0005% Sentry xtalsand 

a Turner local mic. 
Q Jacks Provided for Remote Control, 

Auto-Patch, DC out, AF in/out, COR 

Switch^ etc. 
a True FM - For Rpt, Audio so good, it 

"^sounds iike direct"/ 



1^^^ 



SPEC COMM REPEATER BOARDS 



^>1 



^r^ix 



fnqutre about compiete shielded RCVR. & Xii/fTR, Assemblies f 



mmm 



SCR100 Receiver Board 
Bxt, wide dynamic range! 
Greatly reduces overload, 'de- 
sense', and IM. 
Sens. 0,3uV/20dB Qt. 
Sel. '6d8 @ ±6.5KHz; -90dB @ 
±30KHz, (-1 tOdB w/opt. 8 Pole 
FItr,) 

Exc. audio qualityl Fast 
squeichl $115.00 w/xtal, 
Asmbid 8i Tested 




SCT 100 Xmtr/Exdter Board 

5-6 Wts. Output 

Infinite VSWR proof 

True FM for exc. audio quality 

Spurious -60dB 

With .0005% xtaL $115,00 
Asmbld. & Tested. •BA-10 30 
Wt. Amp Board Si Heat Sink. 3 
sec. LPF St re I. pwr. sensor. 
$51.95 Asmbld. Si Tested 




Call or write today and get the details I 



CTC100 COR/Timer/Control 
Board 

• Complete COR circuitry 

• Carrier 'Hang'& T.O. Timers 
•Remote xmtr. control 
•100% Solid State 

• Many other features 
$32.95 AsmbJd. Si Tested 




iShipJHandl. - $3,00. PA residents add 6% tax) 



ID100 ID & Audio Mixer Board 
*100 bit diode programmable 

memory 
•Adjustable ID tone, speed, level, 

time 

•4 Input AF Mixer St Local Mic 
amp 

► COR Input Si xmtr, hold 
•All CMOS logic 

•Many other features $59.95 
A smb I d. /Te sted / P r ogr a m m ed 
Send for Data Sheets! 



SPECTRUM COMMUNICA TIONS 



194 



1055 W. Germantown Pk./Norristown PA 19401 (215) 631-1710 

Formerly o f Worcester PA 



S8 



GET YOUR 



NEW 



RADIO AMATEUR 




CALLBOOKS 



The U.S. Callbook has over 
300,000 W & K listfngs. It lists 
calts, license classes, names 
and addresses plus the many 
valuable back-up charts and 
references you come to expect 
from the Callbook, 



$14.95 

PLUS SHIPFINQ 



Specialize in DX? Then youYe 
looking for the Foreign Callbook 
with over 250.000 calls, names and 
addresses of radio amateurs out- 
side the USA plus many valuable, 
additronal features of interest to 
the DX'r 

$13.95 

FUUS SHIPPING 




ALL OF THESE EXTRA FEATURES INCLUDE 



rnternatjonal Radio Amateur Prefix&s! 

Rad^o Amateur Prefixes by Countries! 

AB ■RL. Phonetic Alphabet] 

Greai Circle Beahngs and Charls!= 

tnternaliorval ' Q" and '*Z" Signals' 

World Stancfard Time Chartsl 

Interrtationai P^osia' information} 

Woi'ld Pwifx hAapi 

F-CC Btami nation Pomtsf 

WTwre to Bt/y! 

Telegraphers' Abbr^vtaiionsi 

DX Operating Code' 

A.R.RX. Country aa Ust\ 

Al Your Service — Amateur Radi^o Oealersi 

QSL Managers Around the World 1 

World Wide QSL Bureaus! 

Census of Radio Amaleurs of the World! 

T«i0graph Codes! 

AM SAT — Oscar Users Oirectoryi 

Slow Scan Tetevisjon Directofyf 

Reciprocal Licenses' 

IHa:>«Faii Included* 

Many Other Fealures! 



Resf^cted worldwide as 
the only complete authority 
for radio amateur 
QSL and QTH informatton. 



ORDER FORM 



See your favorite electronics 
dealer or write direct for free 
catalog to the publisher, 



Item 



U S CALLBOOK 



FOREIGN CALLBOOK 



Tf\i€ EJCft 



$14 95 



$13.95 



ShippEn^ 



$1.26 



$1.25 



Toii* i'titft 



S 16.20 



$ 15.20 



Itnois residents only add 5% soles tax ^ 



n^mc^ . 



TotJl^ 



MOIO AMATEUR 






llbook 



Addrev^. 



INC. 



City 



Dept. B 925 Sherwood Drive 
Like Bluff, IlL 60044 



Smtt 



ZTp. 



Total 



Mi«ltf Chj*uc No. 



B^k 



Inltirhdiitf ^ 



EWitMH^n Dllr. 



R1 



198 



Mkdk 



NEW! 

FM144-10SXRn 

All Solid State-PLL digital synthesized — No Crystals to buy! 5KHz steps — 144-149 
MHz-LED digital readout PLUS MARS-CAPJ^ 

• 5MHz Band Coverage — 1000 Ctiannels (instead of ttie usual 2MHz to 4MHz — 
400 to 800 Channels) • Priority Channel • Audto Output 4 Watts •IS Watts Output 

• Unequaled Receiver Sensitivity and Selectivity — 15 POLE FILTER, MONOLITHIC 
CRYSTAL FILTER AND AUTOMATIC TUNED RECEIVER FRONT END - COMPARE!! 

• Superb Engineering and Superior Commercial Avionics Grade Quality and Con- 
struction Second to None at ANY PRICE. 




•FREQUENCY RANGE: Receive: 144.00 to 
148.995 MHz. 5 KHz steps (1000 channels). 
Transmit 144,00 to 148.995 MHz. 5 KHz steps 
(1000 channels) + MARSCAP * 

• FULL DIGITAL READOUT: Six easy to read LED 
digits provide direct frequency readout assurmg 
accurate and simple selection o* operating 
frequencv- 

• AIRCRAFT TYPE FREQUENCY SELECTOR: L^rge 
and small coaxialJy mounted knobs select 
lOOKH? and lOKHz steps respectively. Switches 
click -stopped with a home position facilitate 
frequency changing without need to view LED'S 
while drrving and provides the sightless amateur 
with full Braille dial as standard equipment, 

•FULL AUTOMATIC TUNING OF RECEIVER 
FRONT END: DC output of PLL fed to varactor 
dtodes m all front end R-f tuned circuits provides 
full sensitivity and optimum intermodulation 
rejection over the entire band No other amateur 
unit at any price has tliis featu re wh ich is found in 
only the most sophisticated and expensive 
aircraft and commercial transceivers 

• TRUE FM: Not phase modulation — for superb 
emphasized hi-fi audio quality second to none 

•FULLY REGULATED INTEGRAL POWER 
SUPPLIES: Operating volgate for all circuits, i.e., 
12Vp 9v and 5v have independently regulated 
supplies. 12v regulator effective in keepmg 
engine alternator noises out and protects final 



• MONITOR LAMPS: 2 LED'S on front panel 

Indicate (1) incoming signal-channel busy, and 
(2) un lock condition of phase locked loop. 

•DUPLEX FREQUENCY OFFSET; 600KHz plus or 
minus. 5KHz steps Plus simplex, any frequency 

> MODULAR COMMERCIAL GRADE C0N5TRUC* 
HON: 6 unjtFzed modules eliminate stray 
couQlmg and fac*iitate ease of maintenance. 

• ACCESSORY SOCKET: Fully wired for touch-tone, 
phone patch, and other accessories. 

• RECEtVE: -25 uv sensftivity. 15 pole frlter as well 
as monolithic crystal filter and automatic tuned 
LC circuits provide superior sk^rt selectivfty, 

•AUDIO OUTPUT: 4 WATTS. Built in speaker 

• HIGH/LOW POWER OUTPUT: 15 watts and 1 
watt, switch selected. Low power may be adjusted 
anywhere between 1 watt and 15 watts, fully 
protected— short or open SWR 

PRIORITY CHANNEL: Instant selection by front 
panel switch. Diode matn?c may be owner re- 
programmed to any frequency (146.52 

• provided). 

•DUAL METER: Provides '*S'* reading on receive 
and power out on transmft. 

'OTHER FEATURES: 
Dynamic microphone, mobile mount, external 
speaker jack, and much, much more. Size: 2% x 
6^^ X 7"/^. All cords, plugs, fuses, mobile mount, 
microphone hanger, etc., included Weight 5 lbs. 



-_. 




transistor from overload, ^.^^aaa. 

new: 6 METER FMSO-tOSXRH 

Same specif icatiOfls ts above except triiismit/recfflve: 5L00-53 99S WHl 600 chatinels 

IntroductDty Puce 1389=00 





TOHE "' 

ENCODER/ 

DECODER 

iBbodlfCtgrT ^ 




SUMMER SPECIAL 

FM144-10S?(ft]| 

VALUE S599 JO 

Regulated AC/PS 

Model FMPS-4R . . . $49.00 

Manufactured by one of the world's most distinguished Avionics manufacturers, Kyokuto Densht Kaisha, Lid. 

First in (tie world with an aU solid state 2 meter FM transceiver. 



QUALIQfti 



Touch-Tone 
Pad 

MODEL FMTP-1 
. . . $59.00 




n«gtonal Safes S Service Cent«r«: 
hfOrtheaBt: Sul^arda Bay Electronict 
Buuards Bay, M»is 

8&17 S,W, 129111 Terrace, Miami, Florida 33176 please ORDER FROM your local c^orMs.H.^ 

Teleptione (305) 233-3631 • Telex: 51-5628 DEALER OR DIRECT IF unavailable. w«t consider conifflunic3ttofi».i*ic 



AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS 



US. DISTRIBUTOR 



DEALER INQUIRIES IfSlVlTED. 



5«iiUe. Wash 



&mn 



196 



COMPARE! 




SIGMA XR3000D LINEAR AMPLIFIER 





INTRODUCTORY PRICE 

2DAy AmSH[PMENTANVWHEPiElN U S S35 ALASKA AMD HAWAII SLIQHTLV HIGHER 

• FULL BAND COVERAGE 160-10 METERS INCLUDrNG MARS, 

• 2000 WATTS PEP SSB INPUT 1000 WATTS INPUT CONTINUOUS DUTY CW 

RTTY & SSTV. 

• TWO EIMAC 3-500Z CONSERVATIVELY RATED FINALS 

• AL L MAJOR HV AND OTHER CI RCUf T COMPONENTS MOUNTED ON SfNGLE G- 10 

GLASS PLUG IN BOARD HAVE A SERVICE PROBLEM^ (VERY UNLIKELY) JUST 
UNPLUG BOARD AND SEND TO US. 

• HEAVY DUTY COMMERCIAL GRADE QUALITY AND CONSTRUCTION SECOND TO 

NO OTHER UNIT AT ANY PRICE! 

• WEIGHT: 90 lbs. SIZE: 9W' (h) x 16" (w) x 15%" (d). 

FEATURES 

CUST OMPUTER GRADE COMMERCIAL COMPONENTS, CAPACITORS, AND TUBE SOCKETS 

MANUFACTURED ESPECIALLY FOft HIGH POWER USE-HEAVY DUTY lOKW SILVER PLATED 
CERAMIC BAND SWITCHES* SILVER PLATED COPPER TUBING TANK COIL • HUGH 4'^ EASY TO 
READ METERS-MEASURE PLATE CURRENT, HtGH VOLTAGE, GRID CURRENT AND RELATIVE 

RFOUTPUT» CONTINUOUS DUTY POWER SUPPLY BUILTIN* STATE OF THE ART ZENERDIODE 
STANDBY AND OPERATING BIAS PROVIDES REDUCED IDLING CURRENT AND GREATER 
OUTPUT EFFICIENCY* BUILT fN HUM FREE DC HEAVY DUTY ANTENNA CHANGE OVER RELAYS 

• AC INPUT llOV OR 220V AC. 5a60Hz • TUNED INPUT ClRCUrTS • ALC REAR PANEL 
CONNECTIONS FOR ALC OUTPUT TO EXCITER AND FOR RELAYCONTROL* DOUBLE INTERNAL 
SHtELOiNG OF ALL RF ENCLOSURES* HEAVY DUTY CHASSIS AND CABINET CONSTRUCTION 
AND MUCH. MUCH MORE 




SIGMA RF 2000 SWR & POWER METER 

Introductory Price |29 Cai PWR Scales 20OW-200OW 
Freq Range 3 5 150 \flH2p(ease do not confuse the 
RF2000 with similar appeanng lower pncect units 
RF2000 IS an mdividuaity caiil>ra|«<| professional 
quattty instrument - Un^Ljaied at many times itie 
mice Si?e 7" M K 2^" (h) » 2 1/3" (d|. 




NEW AM/FM ANALYZER 

SIGMA AF-250L 

INTRODUCTORY PRICE $199 
Deviation /Modulation Meter FM 0-20 KHz, 
AM: a 100% Size: SV^ (tijx lOU^ (w) % l^A' (d) 
Weight 7 lbs. Frequency: l.SMHz 520MHz 



Z 






y 



ALSO MODEL AF 251LW 
WITHaulLTrN 125 WATT 
CALIBRATED WATT 
METER & DUMMV LOAD 
PRICE $28f- PLEASE 
WRITE FOft COMPLETE 
iNFORMATtON 




STANDARD 
NEW 2 METER 
FM TRANSCEIVERS 
Model SRC 146A 

SPECIAL SALE 

SRC 146A 

d Xtak 34 ^94 and 94/94 
USA 2 Deluu Bffse Cti^ftrfpr 
PT3644 LealtierCase 

AT 19 f?yl5fcief Ant af»d Whtp 

NlCdd5 

Out Prict $289 

NEW!!1 TqlicN Tone padcomplelely 

wired and ready to pluR in-S69.00 




NEW! 
FMSC 2 
SCANNER 

FORKDKFM 144 

14 CHANNEL PROGRAMMABLE 
INTRODUCTORY PRICE $109 





NEW! 
7400 
SCANNER 

FOR KENWOOD TR-7400A 

14 CHANNEL PROGRAMMABLE 
INTRODUCTORY PRICE $109 




TWO NEW 
SCANNERS! 

FMSC I Scanner tot KOK FM 
144 jnd 7^1 00 Scanner II fof 
Trb Kenwtxid TR-740OA 
• FyU scan 1 46 and 1 47 ^Hi 

J ^ y M Hi r dfige • Scjo rat€ i 
MHz/Z seconds »diusid 
tike} • CdntfOls Sc^n/hlok). 

(pW up, clown), pfOg-ram [ 
MHz * Sample ^niralJiitton 



7400 Scanner ll-$189 



^KDK 

ACCESSORIES FOR NDK FM 144 






m?Uft 


Regui^EedACfS 


149 


fm?i 


TcjLH:h Tmi Pid 


S^S 


ruTP 2 


loiicti Twt f^iA mtli 10 Nufflbef 






F^ivpiiMblt Keaunr 


199 


mwc 1 


WiCiC^iWliiMtifeHBtff 






Ti3it*Toi»e^*d 


1^ 


mm I 


Pri^aie till Oftodtr fi^ use «it^ ^nd 






PiQfram«d by Inr Touch Iwi Hi 


s: - 


SCI?* 


AudibEf Tont [ncedf r Defetdtr 


H:=? 


FMSC t 


Sc*Firier - ttjndam. Ant flange 


ttE9 


' rwsc? 


Scinn«r - Prairamatsis [i ChanneJs 


$109 


fAM?, CAP 


Optmn Ki1 - *nv F'ei^ufflCt' 






An^S|?|j9 


4.. 


FMQf-t 


Qn^ifipimu - 2 






EiiFi i*aii(«iK &niii& R«4wii!d 


119 


mof? 


-lHM|0lht{09t«AM 




FHIII 


tHi Ctt^ A Tq 8^1 


m 


StfftArfieKTofteJOOHj • 






4diLritdbit 6^ IWiVtil 


V' 


FUAT 1 


^ Wd^F PartiblF ftnifniii lo* MqIfI 






Moi^l Dt Apjirimeni 


1?95 


[xtra DC Co 


d & Piui 


S3 5){1 


fcQC SflcM b PjoDinfly| 


ma 


!>*nii| MifiiiJ' lEaifii 


Si 00 


S»riricr Mjdtitl 


S^EK? 


MflMCfWi Sr 


»ch^ lEilut 


1* '^ 





1 


iP 


1 NEW- 
1 TEMPO 
t 2020 




V 


Ir 


new SSB 


Iran see [VCF 


providing 


advanced 


engineermg 


and 


unique operating 1 


features Pease w 


r lienor 


informationB 




VAESUFT lOlf/rrMlD 

TRANSCEIVERS 

wrjt^ for special deal 



O^O 



KEWl 
1285 



NYE VmiNG 
MODEL MB II 
3,000 W^TTS 



Antenna impedartce Matching NetmflJrtt. Copper 

ribbon -wound, ^il^ef plated variable inductor. 
Heavy duty 7000 volt variable output capacitor. 
lOpOOQvDlt fj)ied capacitors, Silver plated RF con- 
duct Drs, Large precision, easy to- read dials, 360* 
readout Overlaad proleclion for SWR (neter 



ATLAS 210X-215X and 350- XL 

please wr^te for 5>{>eciai bOfiu:^ and package otters 







The incfitpensaO^e | 


i^ 


1 


aiR||43 


L 


I 


THURLINE 


^'- 

^ 


m 


WATTMETER 


^ 
? 


Authorised Bird 
DistribulOf 


<^ 


Flea^e write for 
specie Idea J 



ATU^COLLIN$.DEN 
TRON, CUSHCRAFr 
BiRO. STANDA*?0. KLM. 
H VGA IN, KENWOOD. 
TEMPO. MINI-PRO 
DUCTS, MIDLAND, VHP 
MARINE, EIMAC. FCOM, 
AMCOMM. He P»eise 



IMO^t 




AMATEUR-WHOLESALE ELECTRONICS 



3817 S.W. 129th Terrace. Miami, Rortda 33176 

COURTEOUS PERSONAL SERVICE— SAME DAY SHIPMENT • FnceMubjifci to chanq. mrhoui notice 
TELf PHONE: (305) 233-3631 • TELEX 51-5&2S • STORE HOURS: 10-5 MON.- FRI. 

Iti^ilw-i Lit: 



OUR CREW: Si. GREGORY WA4KGU J,R MAGGrO Mgr 

Owner/Gea Mgr W8CXL 



S £- GLICKMAN 
WB4HFJ 



A21 



nu'hip ^nrnqt 



197 



TMIS AD ME>tT^#«% C3WLV A Ftw OF THE THOU$^AN:;S O^ fliAAGAll^ ITE.M& 



N 



A. V A I 



SPEAKER SYSTEMS KIT. J 



1.ABUE f <mw 



THt CIAKT B&^ CATALOG- CI WCUETHE HEAOEH SEBVIce CAfiO FOR OUW CATAlOQI 




KEY-TO-MAGNETIC TAPE RECORDER 



S 

m 
■I 
K 
tk 
»C 
•I 

£ 

u 

K 
U 

I 

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B&F does it sgam! N«w speakers arftd 
enclosures, includes 8" woo feu. 4" dome 
tweeters, enclosure {21)412x8"), grill 
cloth, crossover networks, damping, h aid- 
ware ami instruciions. A compiete k*t 
witti ciualitv components at ksw B&F 
prices . . thht fystemi setts for 5198 if 
bought readv to 9a Now you csf> afford 
qualnv liOund* Qty ttd Sh Wt 45 Lb. 

7ZU70283. .S69.95/pair 

SaveSlOOf . , 10 kits far $599,09 

CABIMETS Onlv: Sh. Wt. 30 Lb. 
70S70197 ,S2S 00/paif 




Desk Tod DISPLAY STATION 



Sfnger/Pertec systems with display sia- 
tJon, keyboard. 7 track magnetic data 
recorder, con trotter, etc Singer clones 
out i^ti compute products division and 
these unit become surpius.! Their loss 
iS460xlO*^) It your 94 in , you C«n buy 
thrf super recorder for per>r>jes on a dol- 
lar They are late desfgn models of recent 
mf<j , dnd iijii ^till bi?irvg serviced with 



backup. Unit has inierniil mamory/buffer 
for 80 or 200 character storage. Units 
show character, character no . and record 
no. Read back citci.i[t£ allows ^e^rch on 
fecQird key, olitin^, duplicating, etc. 
Units were working wtien uken cmit of 
service ar>d are complete & ready to- go» 
but may require m*ni>r a diuSTTtients. Sold 
on an "AS IS" basis only. Manuals noi 
supplied with unit, available separately. 
Sue: T9"H X 21!4"W x I9y/'D. T^e not 
suppfiied. 
We have 2 types available 

Md. 4301^7 7-irick Data Recorder, out 

catalog no. 7SF70296 . S21S 8S 

Complete Wanuat ,7SF70296M ,S2B30 

Md, 431 1 7 7 track Data Pecord«r with 
remote data comnumication channel, our 

catalog no. 7SF70297 .S248,fi8 

Gomp^eie Manual ,7SF70297>M .$28. BO 
I Manual WMtgh 3 Lbt.t 

Att Magnetic T»pe Dan Recorders 

are ^tpp<ed via tryck, freight ctiHeci 

to you. Cuslqmer pays ihippinir. 



Ol 




ft 
y 

s 

I 



Al One tirne tK^e data terminals were 
used by stock brokers fo« keepifig tr^k 
of ^tock quotations. They tied m to a 
central syf^t^m which has rH>w been up 
datKJ, leaving these surplus units behind 
Use this unit as a basi^ for building yoyr 
own computet mput /output station or to 
build a compact scope _ . or sirriply take; 
it apart fcir the components within. 
Sold compiete or in parts, prices and 
descriptnons listed below: 
f T' CRT. with Hf-volL sufkply H33tB 
vdc, - 1 730 vdcl. and low volt, supply 
+440V; +22SV. +T25V: +28V: +1.2V: 
+06V; 6.3VDC: 6,3VAC. Also ■ ramp 
generator card & sortie drive circurts 

(15 Lbs.) .S17.50 

1 50 key Block kayfoosrd, with diode 
d matrix on 2 cards. (5 Lbs.l..^, .S12.50 
^ t Hai%cHonie denktop, ifOfie front case, 
suftdble tor up to an 11" CRT, overall 
10">^w st16d k9'1iJT0 Lbs) . . - . .S7,50 
t Wu!: 3 wire line cord, brawn< 7'!g for 
$1.00; 14 wire connector cable fpr 
$2.50 
t COMPLETE UNIT Sh Wt. 35 Lte 

6NB60336 . . , .129 95 

t Also available is a oocnpteie tech. man- 
ual covering operattng proeedure^theorv 
disassembly (Si reassembly), troiible- 
Sh Doting techniques ar>d sfhematics. 
With corriplete unit Si. 00 or sold sep- 
arately for $3.50 each Sh. Wt. 8 o/- 

WH EN ORDERING: 
Specify part, use orde<r r>o GNB&0336 



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Model 52 LINE PRINTERS - $650.00 ea. 

Compyter Surplus dose-flJt on Stnger- 
Friden Md. 52 Irr^ printer. lOOUne&per 
minute with 132 diarftcters per line max 
The printer is co^nrwcted to a system com 
[juter throygh an (nput/ouiput channel 
and may be located up to 2,000 wire -feet 
from computer using a 2 wire line. Uses 
stondarrJ continuous paper fotms, with up 
to 5 copies and 1 originaL Pcwvvri 1 15V^ 
60 Hz; 6 amps. Sizei 30''W x 27' Dp n 
38 " H . 

These units were working St gomg units 
when taken our r if service. Shipped only 
on an 'AS IS" basi^. You should be able 
to put these on line with a minimum of 
work, and then you have a S3 ,600 line 
printer wofkin«g for you at less than 1/S 
the coi^. Shipped vta truck freight c{>lle<cl 
toyou,FO B. Peabodv,Ma, 01960. 
7SF7029e .. , $660.00 

DATA MANUALS, whtle tfiey last . 
7SF70298M .S45.00 

^'^Also available are a few damaged units, 
is.huh have broken glass coders, Dant^ge 
. ITS to baoismetics only. Save $100 
7SF7029S ., ^ ,-...,.. , SS50.00 




Sirig«rFriden 

Md. 52 LlTfe Printer 



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Here's a neat item, brand new and pack- 
aged surplus. Gftat for business, home, 
baby sitters^ p#ople confined to beds, 
emergencies . ot |u£t as a convenience. 
Keep all your most-often caded numbers 
in memoFV at all times. Two models 
available Home 2001 a^id Busirve^3001, 
4 Business 3001 has 40 pi n connector fm 
multi line phones). Sh, Wt 12 Lbs. 

Home 2001 ,7ZU7026&. . . $23.88 

Business 3001 7ZU 70266 . , .$38.68 



EMPLOYEE ENTRANCE STATION SYSTEM 

The system can tains the followirrg 
modular sections: 

A, Badge Reader with povuer supply, 
Nolther coded but comes out ASCII, 
Input no V. 60 Hi, Sh. Wt. 15 Ltss. 

7SF702«5 A .$2500 

S, Modular Power Supply 0,F. ^V, 3 A; 
±12V, 25A;+24V. .5A. 10 Lbs. 

7SF70295 B $19.50 

C. Modular Memory Stack, with drivers 
etc. 512 % 6. requires 24V input, 5 Lbs. 

7SF 70295 C $17 60 

D. Centra) Processor for above menory, 
5 Lbs 7SF 70295 , . . .S25O0 

E. Hi Voltage Power Supply for plasma 
display IbeloMi 5 Lbs. 

7SF70295-E. . SIO.OO 

F. 4 Digit Display on front panef 3 Lbs. 
7SF7029&F SlOOO 

G. Time Clock for badge reader, etc. 




COLOR "TV" 

CHASSfS fif PARTS 

Nevw solid state 
color TV chassis and 
parts for use with In- 

Lirw btack matrix picture tuLtes. F^eatufes 
include orw button color luning AFC and 
low power consumption. 

Wc have tvwo chassis types, the TS951 
ifor 13 & IS") and the TS953 (for 19"}. 

To build a complete 19^' TV ihese parts 
mutt be added: UHF 81 VHF tuners, pEc 
tum Cube. tut)« shield, purity margnets. an 
tennj, yoke, speaker, on -off swiixh. 4 
TDK pots, bincitng posts & case To t)uiLd 
a 13" or IS" TV you'll hav^to add: pic 
lEure tut»e, tube shield, yoke, purity mag- 
nets, antenna, 2nd stage hj voltage boost, 
binding posts &i case (chassis h^s tumors} 

We do not oHer a complete parts pack- 
atje. bur we do incfude full tech. training, 
n-iamiaJ, and wmt hmts sotie pais avadLabie. 

These chassis are new & gtiargnte«il 

Price List Sh Wt. 12 Lbs each, 

13" TV Chaisii lw/tLin«ri & confroti) 

6Z60175 S4g,S0 

IB" TV Chassis tw/tuneri 8» controli^ 

6Z60174 $49.50 

19" TV Chassis {r^o tur>en, no conlrds). 

6Z60172 S23 &0 

VHF Tunef 4for n"\ . ,6260303 S850 
UHF Tufwf (for W*\ . .6Z60304 $250 
Antenna Te^eicope . -SM 1004 19 $1.50 
Bindirt g^ost Ais'y. . 4IV1IQQ422 .$ 1.50 

We have found some of the sam« rfiode^ 
*TV" chassis tfiat have been damaged, 
most ^Afith befit frames or cracked PC 
bowds. They are sold "AS IS", at Jow, 
low prices. Parts are worth 5X as much. 
All sales final. Sh Wt. 12 Lbs. each. 

13" Chassis . . . 7D270O59 , . . . $22.50 
15" Chassis . , . 7DZ7006O. . ,$22.50 
17'^ Chassis . . . 7DZ70061 . . . .514.88 
10" C ha^iii , . . 7DZ70062 . , Si d.BB 

TV to MONITOR INTERFACE KIT 
TV game tioard allows interface of any 
TV as a video monitor fpr t^o^puteruse. 
With power supply & deta fof 300/73 
ohm. Home brnw money saver! 3 Lbs 
7ZU70213, , , $5.00afl. , . $2? 88 fo#tl 



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II. HOCKEY & SOCKER game, 2 
levels, LFQ scoring, fpy stick ccnlrols. 
New and goaranteed. Sh. Wt 8 Lbs, 

7HU7Q28^. S22.S0 5 for $100.00 
2. TV TENNIS, Kit form. AS IS. 5 Ura. 

7HU70250 S8.&a 4 for $2d.&B 



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Thil unique ^system for verifieaiion of 
entering employees is m^MJe up of modul 
ar components, each of which is useful 
sefWf^tely. You can buy iusi the part 
you need, or porchan an entire tysteiTi 
for your own oses and/or education. Cap- 
able of ii«-m to jm entemal printer. 
Si/e: IVf^'-^ k ST" x 6^", 



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TOUCHTONE 
GENERATOR 
CHIP 

He**, 2 of 8 ervoder chip ME8900, Isim 
ilar to the f^ 144 TO) Sold with data 
#»Mft Ofi y^es of MC1441G chip Mo 
crystals required. Sh. Wl. 8 oz 

7VL70160. . .SB.95ea. . . $60,00 far 10 



POSTAGE: Please add sufficient funds 
for postage and ir^suraJice Shipping 
weight for mercharMJise is ttsted at the 
end o( eacfi product description All 
shippEog is from Pedbody. Ma. 01^60, 
M^s. Residents Add 5% Sates Tax 

SEND FOR OUR FR£E CATALOG! 

Or, receive our catalog in 

an order and imufe yourself 

of a plaw-e on our marliing list 



5 Lb*. ... 7SF7029SG $1000 

H. Key Switch SPST 8 OJ. 

7SF70295-H. $2 00 

J. Complete Unit (Used)' 

7SF7CI295-J sesea 

K. Complete Unit (New)* 

7SF 70295- K S88 50 

* Complete units wetgh in €)ccess of 

7S pounds and must be shipped via truck 

freight cojjectjo^^ou^ 



^ 



JOVSTJCKS 
Two 1 OK POT'S 
Super for XY func- 
tions audio, computer, 
remote control, graph - 
H^. etc Sh. Wl, flo^. 
7J70163 $4 95 



Joystick: Four 100 K Pot's; by ALPS 
The bsst controls on the market. . 8 oz. 
7J70293 $5.95 ea 



LOGIC & OP AMP 
POWER SUPPLY 



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PHOf^e ORDERS WELCOME I 

Bank Americard. Master Charge and 

American Express Accepted 
Phone: (617) 531-5774 / S322323 
S1Q.Q0 Minimum on Charge Orders 

B&F ENTERPRISES 
Dept. "S" 

119 FOSTER STREET 
PEABODY, MA. 01960 

(617)531-5774/532-2323 



This regulated power ^ppiy ha& otjt 
puts of ±15 volts at 0.25 amps and +5 
vQlis ai 2.5 a-mps, with ai riitpui of 115 
VAC Manufactured by 3 computer 
company as pert of a phone d eta termi 
nal. Three (3) 723's (IC's) are used for 
voltage regulation. Units have barrier 
strip outputs, arvj arc^ open fram^ Size; 



b'* %%•• x2'\ Newsijrolut 


Qty. Ltd. 


Sh Wt 5Lti4. . . 6MI60215 


. - .S17.50 


3forS45 00. 6MI60215 


$45 00/3 



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198 



Post Office Box 3097 A • Torrance, California 90503 



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CALCItlATOR 

WRIST WATCH 

Dtsiginfid fqr tti9 (^ fh« go e#eajfiv«, ihai indJ- 
vidufl] wt>o hBA la imldr tlM»e on ifvtt ^pc^t 

Hm ttM w ue goM lone signless sfetf ^MVAcfi 
lagtums ^simest i^a pni<)rQHcin»ibv- Tin MOS 
Imle girat^d cin^vikt o oft tat fi a the equ Na J a ni of 
more Than 10.<XX) trwi»iLjilDrB. 

Th» LED wTEst ttpfch ciispl^s dtfe, tMn», 
ll ^p— BBOon i ii ama tf ao fiitictiongas an jiQtfl 
dlgif cateu^feDT with nwnocy. InfomuJl^A 
stofied tn memofv ^m\ im wc^i^ ^ any tal*r 
dale, men wrttoka Ot months Use Itiis n>Efnory 
feature to stdra pftone numbers, parh^ng ftlall 
hscaffcon or flighl dapwUim time. 

Monursclurod by dha of Calif am l^'a leading 
Q(jr&space coniraclcirfl, Because of th* 
discount prica w« ti«ve aQre&d not 1o publish 
ItiB manufacturer's namtr 

tncludea batteries, jewelry case arid ta-monlh 
factory warranty. 



CONNECTORS 
p:^ "^ I RS'232 






r* » I ■ I «■■>... .1 qI 



aala pltif fi dDoil 

*3.95 

D02SS ftmik 

'3.95 



498 Scotch 

iBltrHS. otSKETTES 

3^1 ItH 374* itriti 4«d 



e«Bpitilit« irhti 




Electronic EKTERTAtHMENT Center I TELETYPE] 



I I x 




Color 124.88 



Tennis -Handball 

Hockey- Smash 

Ac II Oil |.ii3^h.Dd ctilor BntarSal'tmftnl \ai 
thtp whHJlB t«mily. ^dJuEilatitB ihill Jfvai 
GOnlro4l *lk>* iplayA^'k h^I jH agn lo eon*- 
ptt* 4n l«miia, hocksy and ti|«icfb«ll 
TMl tour gime «nlBitBtnin*n4 otnliK 
imm reut itsitvisiiKi jnto • Tid*c pt«r 

te men K4fii'i|S. itvc- CCSbSA ' 

Ins LiKmimnwil cxrfci 'HIim 



HEXADECIMAL KEYBOARD 

*29?5 



mrttmmtn i 

F7}K^i40ftlll^ntf' f 
in BtmdipiS Fmv pq^ 

Etch MiMffltriy [»AiBlBBf i:Shcnn(ytl 

shot" aeeouoci eifisuitn' 

RallAl?l« low 4r|iitl<]Fi iiiovlpi r^AJn 
pluriQ«<ll iri ciecfMod ler thB Smoot*^ 
DparaJlon iri^d Icmg Mb af Ittta pramlum 






Now Frtim Ttlttypfl. tPva U(}dgr 
4S l» cspag|«{)<f pfinimg 13? ASCII 
c:ri«r*etifi icwr Dm. 3«iid land ra^^i^fi 
ddte a1 10- or 30 worcii FHr second. Kry 
boBrd gBiHfBiM ill i:|?l! ASCII code ccmbtni 
liana. R&^3^ iMmrfiuttF, fckme ta tnt pQc^ltr 
IKMJAJ 33, P«U thMI H*ii uC)«>n r«qu(ei] UmftvMtC 

t Witt HlMlnilt^ 







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jlP'^' IMSAI/ALTAIR 
Edge Connector 



Amir, (mini cofnpatible gold ptnfiKt. duet 50 
t.12$ ctnlari) ihrw tl«T wlr$ wrap mi^m 
conrwclor. 3 tor $13.50 



CALCULATOR 
KEYBOARD 




E?a 



Id— I jqrt|tjlim<l|riftyitiH»,Sigy- 

tir alArnH, Totien Ton* or hexa- 
ijaciifiaJ a)fnput«r inpul cod*. 





DIGITAL 

ALARM CLOCK 

C«iiifieUtt HCI95 



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WilnirtHOfilrMKl dtcoratof clock fHiluril Iffpt -?* L£D (Hsplay WFHQb 4i 
EirlvBn bvltianfluv Natlonftl J^M5;SflS4lirmftl0n:hchlp. Prasat 24Fiaul ilyifm 
fuilClKiri si'Igwb ycMJ to analiBn at iImi uhtmi timp aogh niDrnlng wJlhQut 
reflating Uprin fMchlfliQ |r»fi *alierLj() lliTMf, Iht dDCli's lOuCfS^MkiMr iffiiH 
a gentna lon«. Touch ll^e sndwli buUcMi «ind dcuB oir for an sfldlllohdl & 
ininiJiM □< iiiio Clc)C:k Blaa Funclkixii. *t « Tin'in<nult flUpM Hfrw 



24.88 



vO ^^UNfVAC 
KEYBOARD 

Trm iiii«tQwi! iiiMftf ljnii4c "r^C HailH-rtn tit^Kwil i'if#rihli 
10 iKlw 4i||ll4ej|ai llHin C«|,.lDrhi B lAklldKl lar finlT U^ M 
tivfl idiadi' LgnncJiilp<i inpi,i1 rtivic* lar j|Li:aifr\tnif|| jnid 
t«iri.1hKlflll(iCi*nt DW lumnc %e/^ are |»iHC«d a(t in* llHMr 
llwrny vqiHEi ^ii iMiiiiHitilii' 4 t'fl!\ k(>y iclcllnfii nu|t;h|riir thH 
I^Tial Aildwi ni'« hiniMrl numeric dali pMry 
Onvir^l 411711 wM tMm UimJ CiJl umirRnlMifll in WtCltiWA 
Ddni3ll4iiii Cdr^plMH wilh dncurrumialJori 



^OV STICK SjT^ 




k 

TTifB idj^ilick: fwiTUFB four tOOK pofpnHo- 
mecerg. tNiE vtry rnkftiance proporticmal li> 
trid angia ol |lid stlch Perfeci lor Ifsla^iBlain 
gaiTiHi, qund itBroo and radio conlrollati 
Lkcralt 



mflnUftL DRflPHiTE 
OBPLflV DEnEflfiTDP 



MwMn lKiin;>eef R«b in!iiii«iip> Uu fi liU'ipffgPi 4t - 

r)*»ttl«^illBiftT^O^EITTXiucn<i;l11ri'ull affr^ •.- ' 
fowweai* AiCli Mt Sin-conrvnici q^uMif jfiA**^ul>- iHiri*i 

by ^l^nrjariln !ii I qlilnrni.] Indus IrMi nntrltfltwilh 



$3,98 Digital Clack 




Hpc ■ nkroswitch upon f«actiin^ 




7JM90 


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53 


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199 


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Microcomputer 

Power Supply Kit 



3I»H 
301 H 
3CI1CN 

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$S4B8 

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Jim 

SttCM 

31TK 
3T11 

3iaca 

3T301 

33!0lt'15 
3MT-5 

320r->2 
S2DN5a 
aCi!-24 

3G9N 

34DK-S 

3IDK-i 

340K18 
34i3K-2* 
3«IT-S 
3«ST-t2 



CAndactor Ft. 

IBBONWIRE] 

SPECTflASTmP 



ors 

19 50 loa 



2M222ZA.20 Jfl .K.iS 



2N^0SS 

mini 

2N3904 
2»i390« 



,A4 M Tl .«S 

.99 54 J7 JS 
213 19S 175 l*t 

.IS .11 .09,07 
.15 .11.09.07 

Diodes 

1N4002 LOOv.OSOe.aS 
IMDOS fr«0«.J0.08.07 
lN4l4t]i|pjl jOTjOSjM 
i*A|« rH ta, 10 2^ Iftfl 

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MICRO 
BUZZER 



Thumbwheel 
s:^g^ switch 

^*'^|Teii posJIio^n 

BCD 

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SPOT 

MINIATURE 
TOGGLE 
SWtTCH 

VS8 Jl .71 .fifi 




TRIMMER 

POTENttOMETEflS 
211 lOK 50K 



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SPOT MINIATURE 

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CAPACITORS 



ELECTROLYTICS 



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ROCKER swrrcH 



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DIP Switch 




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10 zi J 00 

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TflANSFORMER 



Solar Cells 



*119 

10 100 




S98 ya 



9 foot 

HeiTT 

datf ireundtd 
power cord and mating 
chassis connectors. 



SPST 



DISCOUNT 




SOOaA 

-A A" 

Fast CtfABiii 



IC SOCKETS 



pil 


iflrv wrap 
4t. 29 90 


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Frequency 
Counter 

$79 



95 




UTILIZES NEW MOS-LSl CIRCUITRY 



You've requested it, and now it's hefei The CT-EO freQuencv 
counter kit has more features than counters seiling for twice the 
price, M«99uring frequency t$ now as eesy as pushing a button, the 
CT-SO wH! automaticallv place the declfnol point in all Ixodes, giving 
you quick, reUable readings. Want to use the CT-50 mobile? Mo 
problen^, it runs equaUv ^^ well on 12 V dc as It does on 110 V ac. 
Want super accuracy? The CT-50 uses the popular TV color burst 
freq, o1 3,579B45 MHz for time base. Tap off a color TV with our 
adapter end get ultra accuracy — XOT ppml The CT-50 offers 
professional quaHty at the unheard of price of $79^95, Order voLirs 
today! 

CT-50, 60 MHz counter kit . , , . , -.,.,... S79,95 

CT-50 WT, 60 MHz counter, wired and tested ..,.,...,,. 1 59.95 
CT-600, 600 MHz prescaler option for CT-50, add ...,..,,, 29,95 



SPECIFICATIONS 

Sensitivity' *ess than 25 mv. 

Frequency range: 5 Hz to 60 MHz, typically 65 MHz 

Gstetime: 1 second, 1/10 second^ w^ith automaitc decimal 

point positioning on both direct and prescaie 

PispJay: 8 digit red LED A*' height 

Accuracy: 10 ppm, .001 ppm with TV time base I 

input: BNC, 1 megohm direct, 50 Ohm with prescale option 

Power: 11 V ac 5 Watts or 12 V dc @ i Amp 

Size J Approx. 6" x 4" x 2'\ high quality aluminum case 



Color burst adapter for .001 ppm accuracy 
CBI.kit -- 



$14,95 




CLOCK KIT 
6 digit 12/24 hour 



Want a clock that 
looks good enough for your 
living room? Forget the com- 
petitor's kludges and try one Of 
Qur^l Features: juJnba A" digits, 
Polaroid len^s filter, extruded aluminum 
case available in 5 colors, quaUty PC boards 
and ^jper instructions. All parts are included, no 
extras to buV- Fully guaranteed. One to two hour, 
assembly time. Colors: sllyer, gold, black, bronze, 
blue (specify). 

Clock kft* DCS ,......-,,.,.. S22.95 

Alarm clock, DC-8, 12hr only 24.95 

Mobrte clock, DC-7 , .,....,... 2535 

Clock kit with 10 min ID timer, DC-10 . . . 25.9& 
Assembled and tested clocks available^ add 
$10,00 



CHEAP CLOCK KIT S8J5 

DC^ Fp^turei. Dont not 

« 6 d^git ,4" LED mctude board 

* 12 or ^ rormjt Of tr«n»forTner 



PC Board 
S3J95 

TrantfofTTwr 
SI 49 




600 MHi 
PRESCALER 



Ejct^nd Tll« r»ni|« of your 
counter to GOO MHi. Worki. wiHh 
all court lofi. Lsmi. than 1 BG mv 
Mnsitivriv. Sp^fcity t-|0 qt "HOO 
Wired, teslifd, fS IB ... SS9,&5 
Ki?, PS m S44.g5 



T 



VIDEO TERMINAL 
KIT $149,95 



>.i*^|j(iiri1 APtii « TM nt In IsBr.tHnu s tcfttn'stB inTetftciimi T*i-mJ»«iJ 
*in ccrrmiiciin-n TD VlJur tn\crati'iit«tlQi 4%vnahranaAia \n^mrm^4i \h 
mqnv *mt^itm mm mljigln Q.vqK ■muiu'v, cr^t4il canEFOIIwil ivno and 
itt^^i piin Ii4c Ha ^^ b«udl. i fiJiw»i ^^ ^? cti inc tert bv T-fl ^f^nt, 

•luitfit ■!nfl)ii3>»'rira>tnputw r ' ■: « t|l^«4 '°r«t4rd ipflc** <>• 

to ffiil •* iHifi. itfvcin Pttt* 1 V 3. tttH* tfoiH B* IS T U Bi um ^. tN> 







CAR 
CLOCK 
KIT $27.95 



12/34 Nflgr iAVdII AC dr DC 
#Mtiah A.tf.htMr'lV CI rMinutiiymariirH 
•fl ►■jfTibft *" LEO PBflHauts 
■ ■ -ilariiv KiagikLi|] 

C^PWfttwKM, PC II 4^7 .fti 




AUTO Oil MM En 
■S2.50 

Aulq^mxlitBi1<v 4d|Mn* 
duvlaw brigtirnvW4«cikr(l 

Pv DC IT C^CIiA4 



30 watt 



2 meter 
Pomrar Amp 

The famous H£ cLbss C p^im-iv 
arnp noA »v«ilBb1a mail ord«ri Fouf 
lAf^ns in tor 30 Watft oyt, 2 in for 15 
outj 1 in for S OUt» kr^re^itil^ vftlMt^ 
cotnpj^ete wittt aft parts. mii1ruet4Qn» 
ana detail} on T R relay. Caws n.oi 
Included. 
Completfi Kit. PA 1 ....... . $23.9B 



CALENDAR ALARM CLOCK 



Msi *vvrY r^tLir* i^^a CQ^d e^v as^ lev 
Kit incluiMt i«v«fV tiling rnrnsmm C«1UI^ 

FEATURES: 

'Ti-wi :24 Hoiji Aiitw * 7tx}i ch'v 'Aum »H** 

4 tlof tBT^ banfe IJ0 «bJtli buMt-Hin on on^ 

CDmpleT9 Kn, l«* c«n, 

DC-9 , , , , . , $ai).S5 



LINEAR 



REGULATOR 



5314 Clock 
74S0O 
74S1 1 2 
7447 
7473 
7475 
7490 A 
74143 



$2.95 

.7S 
,79 
.3& 

.50 
.55 

3.50 



55 B 

$67 
1468 



$ .50 

.75 

1.49 

1.49 

*S0 



LED DRIVER 
75491 .50 

75i93 50 



78Mq 

309k 

309H 

340IC 

7805 

7812 

7819 

78t8 



12 



4 



^ 
^ 



V 



TRANSISTORS 

SI 49 MBF 23S3aW VHF $11.95 

.89 NPM 2N3904 tvpe 10/S1.00 

99 PMP 2N3906tvpfl KVSI.OO 

99 NFr^ Powar Tdb 4CMV O/St 00 

.89 PNf> Power Tab 4QIM 3/Sl,0Q 

.89 FET MPF 102 i¥P» 3/$2.00 

.89 UJT 2M2646 tvP« 3/S2.00 

.89 2N3055 NPN^o^v .7& 



DIODES 1KV^.5A 



Si/Sl 00 



lOOVJA "to SI 00 



tN9l4A typm 



50/S2D0 



LED DISPLAYS 




FMD 359 . . .75 
FND S10 \.7S 

OL707 i.as 

NP773Q , , . t.2& 
FledPo^oroidFiliPf . , .4,26" X 1.125' 



741 OP AMP SPECIAL 

Ftctorv ftfifft* mmi d)p (witlii both 
Xvro* and 74^ pari nuinb«ri 

10fQrS2.00 



.59 



SOCKETS 

14 P^N 5/Sl uiJ 

16 PIN S/$t 00 

24 PIN 2/Sl.OO 

40 PIN 3m 00 



FERR!TE BEADS 

i^iih info and fpect 

15/SUOO 

Ghole Baluin Es^iAa 

5/$1 .00 



ramsG!^ sIssiiciiBS 



P.O. Box 4072 Rochester NY 14610 
(716)271 6487 



TELEPHONE ORDERS 
WELCOME 



Satltfaci ion 

m o nay ra- 
t u ri <l # d . 
COD. a<9!tf 
SliJO Ordv« 
undar tlO.CW 
add i.75 Nv 
rcaiaanti aod 



MINI -KITS 



TONE DECODER KIT 

A c(HTva^rl« iQfWi dacoder one ungjii PC Hqprd 
F«tur«.: 4W<iaOO Hi adjuitafal-p litquvftcy 
t^ntje, vnltigt nsgylatinn., 507 IC Uttflui t« 
taudi-tnnB dftcodinfl, teno tiuufi deiBCilon. FSK 
itfimod, ti^ntiUngi, qnd mnnv CJthe^ uflM, Uii 7 
far 1? hut tern iou£liTrirki> decadirtg. Runt 0n S 
lo 12 WDltt. 
CompJate KH, TO-ll , » . ........ t4.AB 






SUPER SNOOP AMPLIFIER 

A 5u per -^rvsi live amplifier wfiich wiil pick up a 
pin &op at IS feetl Great for mcMiitoring 
baby'^ room or ^ a ger^ral purpose te$t 
amplifier. Full 2 watts of output, runs on 6 to 
12 vo|t«. uses any type of mike. Require^ S-45 
ohn^ speaker. 
Compt^te K it, BN-9 , , , , $435 



FM WIRELESS MIKE KIT 

Transmit up lo 300' to any FM broadcast radio, 
uses any type of mike. Runs on 3 to 9 V. Type 
FM'2 has added super sensitive mike pr^amp. 
FM*1 S2.9S FM-2 S435 



COLOR ORGAN/MUSIC LIGHTS 

See musk: come alive* 3 different lights fibks- 
witli mytic or voice. One light for low^^one for 
tfie midH^ange and one tor the highs. Each 
diannet individually adjustable, a fid drives up 
to 300 Mtytts^ Great for partis, band music, 
nite clubs and more. 
Complfllft K it, ML-1 S7.95 



LED BLIWKY KIT 

A great attention getter which alterrratelv 
flashes 2 Jumbo LED&. Use for name badges, 
buttons. Or Wf^riiiHtg type panel lights, Runs or> 
3 to 9 vqJcs. 
Completti' Kit ... ^ ...... ^ .. ^ ^ ^ ^ .^ ..... . $2^6 



POWER SUPPLY KIT 



CompMrst Vipto tlfUl iiTlfl _pQ i ' iw ^Jpftv m^ 

wKlH «a«ablB M 5 vDm 41 20D mA arvi *% «a«ti 



^ 



SIREN KIT 

Produces upward and downward war I char^ 
acteristic of police siren. 5 watts audio output^ 
runs on 3-9 volts, uses 8-45 ohm speaker. 
Complete Kit, SWI-3 **.,,.,.. S2.95 

DECADE COUNTER PARTS 

Indudes: 7490A, 7475, 7447, LED readout, 
current limit resistors, and i nil ruct kins ofi an 
easv to build low cost frequency ODUTitef. 
Kit of ptrti, DCU-1 . , $3J50 



200 



RE 



ADVA 




KIT $11^5 

ASSEMBLED $17.95 
ADD $1,25 FOR 
POSTAGE/HANDLING 



FREE 



ICor FET't WITH 
$5&SlOORDERS.t 
DATA SHEETS 
WITH MANY tTEMS. 



VARIABLE POWER SUPPLY 

• Continuously Variable from 2V to over 15V 

» Short-Circuit Proof 

» Typical Regulation of 0.1% 

» Electronic Current Limiting at 300mA 

» Very Low Output Ripple 

i Fiberglass PC Board Mounts All Components 

■ Assemble in about One Hour 

i Makes a Great Bench or Lab Power Supply 

» Includes All Components except Case and Meters 



OTHER ADVA KITS^ 



LOGIt PHOBE KIT U» with CMO§, TTL, DTU, RTL, HTL. HiNJL and •ncMt MOS it*b: 
Buili<in prDtcctian sgairiTi poJlirrty rovErsal and avHvaJtunE. Drawi ofilv a lew nlA ti^yn ttfCdII 
urxtqiT iftft n'-jgl L£D rn^Ji^iuc. CDrnplEit 4c :t includEi nast *nd [itip \aadi. QNLV $Tj6S 

FtXED FteaUI-ATED JN^n/ER SUPPLY KJTS--ShDrt^ircuil F«vi wm Kwit-HHl ^unNm: 
Mmttli^, C^fimpncE siu »nd tvpieal reQulatJDn -or 0.5^ mj^t iJlHSe id^ul 1tjr 'i'>u4t ti\itMa(iiC 
{H13»KI)I. Avjilstiltt for {;V # ^OOnA. {FV « fiOC^A. 9V « SODmA., t?V t» ^DDilA, 1EV 9 
S)Dn»A. Sptflify "i}l!»fl9-*hBn ordsriPQ. Sa.SS nau 

Thtffi «Hy (D-iiKfnt^tB kin incttKJB ell cnmjiantihtir ■£diTi|><>«iIii dauilad 'MflfU'CtiWII' and |i^^ 
Nbct^g^i PC >>crfrd^, Pgw^r 9jpp|v k>ti do ngl; inchtdE ose-'Of me-Ufri^ Add $1:2S pt« kh IcpI- 
iKiilagi uid ligndllfiji 

tMAlL NOWIFPiE DATA SHEETS *i*ipliBd wi* mijji/ i3*m: Eram (ha ad. FHE£ UM 

flEQU'tSt-?'41 Op Amp wUh vvfrv orcHir gf JE «<r inarB-14B DUaA Oft fi-Uti^ b' Vfta ElOCF 

FET'1 wilh A4fv Oi^dfli at Si or rTV[Kn, (H;(TiTH4rk.«iI priar tn 3/31 ^'7^. Drv: 'rcE- rL?>n F^ei 4h<!4<. 

□ RDEH TOP A V— All -Ki^l ^ttftVl ^$ prinr j^l* pnd priciii fulqect Id Chmflfl- wilhQuC iiWI^. 

AJI ilEitinf*: ritw »ir(rfvi* (MrBi-!0OH JunnciofifllJy imtsd, 

WHITE FOH FREE CATALOG ^76 OlTsriftD Jmn 3S0 wmiWKlMiHQf* H^rrirf i*i i1ock. 

Srnd 13^ il ■»'{». 

TERMS: Send chrek nr >rmiiv u^tHH JU.S. fiuKftl" iwi^h ofidir. Hta p»v Srt Qasipasta;^ »□ U^ 

Ciiniii] 4jid MrxicD (flutirtfl *it kittl. SLOtf hHi-K!lL.i^ drurgtcri imlws uralcr 5H5. Calif, tbm- 

ileniJ «d J 6% HIM UK, ^fintgn Vitn lM V:"*^^- <^f^ orcfen: ' «U 1 1 .DD Erviiz c^ar^. 



MORE SPECIALS: 

RC4196DN t5V ^ &9r«A VOLTAGE REGULATOR IC, Vetv e»S¥ to 

use. Mjikes » mat Hrgh.j^y FEgLitortBd "ibV Supply for OP AMP's, itc, 

Rti'-quirtf? orriy unrltguEatDtl DC 'J 13-30 VI and 2 bVpEi;; C^in^lcitOrS, 

With Diiiit SJii?ei arfd Sclwrt»{>tfcs,. B-mr* »"P1P S^-25 

LiV1741 F R EO CQAflP E NSAT E D OP AM P- ^i A74 1 , MCI 741 , bXq. mD I P 5/$1 

MCI 45a DUAL 741 OP AA1P mDIP 3/$1 

RC4G5a DUAL 741 OP AJWP mDIP 3/$1 

SWaSOfl NPW TRANSlSrrOR AMPLIFIER/SWITCH to 5Q mA yWO 6/Sl 

Z EN ER S -Specify VoJtaga 3.3 , 3.9 . 4.3, S.I. B.fl, S.2 4{M>m;W 4,'5 1 .QQ 

3.1, ia, 12. 15,. ie^ 1B.30.. 32,54, 27,-Qf 33V (M&?i.) 1 W^n 3/31, 50 

• MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

# ALL TESTED AND GUARANTEED 

ADVA 

BOX 4181 K . WOODS! DE, CA 94062 
Td. (415) 851-0455 



ELECTRONICS 



I DIODES 

RECTI F I 
1N4Setv 

iKHfl: to 

1N4Sfi 

1Mg74 
1li3DG4 

|K4IQ; 
IIIMDa4 

iNane 
iPMni7 

IN4154* 

WiJiatn 

IN'f4G4 

lN4l72aFP 

iiy475]^ 

IME;31 to 

INGZJ& 



EPS 

a/31 
15^1 

TE/S1 

10/Sl 
1 Di'&! 

IE/SI 



TflANSE3T[)flS TRANBISTOftS I TFIflNSFSTOfiS Llll£Afl iC's 



VAFAGtDRS 
1ME]3?i« 
1fiEI«t 
da 144MH/ 

HVIE211t{7 

HV1E34 

lilVi|»«t1i 

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ZNTDB 

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:M720 
21191 B 

;ni'E13 

IAJ2J1<9 

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:2ftf3«li4 
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i2N3li33: 

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2rJ3l34 
3N1H23 

JN39(l3tn* 

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;iu3?2z 

ZN19S4 

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SQ.Z4 

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4$ 

Ji'&l 

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3B 

.IB 

.24 

E.'^SI 

E/Sl 

sa.24 

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3/^1 
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ZN4IZ4 

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12N4360M 

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2114392 
2^44 1 G 
23U441BA 
2«tl4«St T4 
2'V4B&1 
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2^4905 

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Ji'Jl 

jysi 
a.'st 

5/?1 

(1/31 

B.i'Sl 

SI 

Z/£1 

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sci.ad 

SI 

2,'&! 
Z^£1 
USD 
SI 
l.'S1 
4/S1 

flj^l 

6/Sl 

5/11 

S,<'31 

3/Sl 

SS.dD 

iM 

S.'^l 

J.'SI 

Sl.5«l 

l.9[i 

13 DO 

2.50 

IZ-tlD 



ZNBfi3S 

^i^S«44 

CPBJJ 

CPB60- 

CfBBI 

E1DD 

E1D!1 

?175 

MPFIDZllB 

PflFFlW 

MIPM12 

|y5PS«&S!i 

flEINt 

s^^zdhi 
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Si9<ae3 

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OICITAL 

mmm 

SIV741Qr» 
SK742Dn 
jinT44£i[« 
SNTit&IK 
Slii:f4^3ft 
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2.'S1 
2,' SI 

$4.Bi3 
S.%.BO 
&4.DQ 
4^51 
3/SI 

5^EI 

4/11 
3/« 
Qvill 

iSti 

4/S1 
4/S1 

P.QP 
3/S1 

SS.?$i 
.ia 

.15 
14 

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M 
3& 
4i 
.35- 
44 



LINEAR IC'i 



tM1l>DM 

LNnciAn 
LwraiiN 

LM32DK'IZ 
LM32aK'!l5 



S7.za 

27 
23 

1.25 
■M 

l.3« 
Lit 



LM34B'K 5 

LW34i]T-S 

LW|34nTB 

LM34BT-1Z 

LM34DT-1S 

LM34aT-I4 

LMSirBfJ" 

tM3T7ig 

iM3¥BN 

NE5E5V* 

IfESbSA 

LM^nCH 

LMI}«iC«l 

lm;?3m 

LM7£3N* 

LM73^N 
LU741I:H 

tM,741CN14 

74RCJ Dir 

£44[:P in D IP 
L*H3{)41^ 

1.1/1^11111 
KHZESECl^ 
Z74DD£ 
;CA341Z1A 

: LM]4)7SHl 
^1:A3:BSG' 
LM39(HIIY 

i;c4i»iD 

RC4194TK* 
FlC4195ffiK^ 
HCqiBSTK" 
LH4Z5DCH 
:RC4E<StUl* 

Mia mw 

DM7S4?Z 



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1-59 
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•% *SUPER SPECIALS: ^ 



1 Ng 1 4 TOOV/1 0mA Di«ie ?0/ST 

IhfiOOl 100V,''1A Red- 15/Sl 

1N415430V 1N914 25/S1 

Bfll 50V :.i A Bridge Rec 4/Sl 

2N2222A NPM Trgriiitor 6/S1 

2N 2907 PNP Transiitor e/Sl 

2N3055 P?^WQr Xi3.tQr 1QA ..6S 

2N 3904 N PN Amp/£w ,1100 a<1S 1 

2N 3E?0G PSNfP Amp/Sw ii 1 00 ^m 

CP650 Powar F£T V^Amp $5 I 



MP F 102 SOOMHz RF Amp 
40673 MOSFETflF Amp 
Lr.1324 Oyad 741 Dp Amp 
LN:37G Pas Volt f^ag mDlP 
NE555 Timer mCUP 
LM723 2-37V Rag DiP 
LM741 Comp Op Amp mOlf 
LMT4&SDual ?41 mDIP 
CA3E^S5Trijps Arr&y DIP 



3/$1 

Sl,75 

,94 

4/*T 

3/*l 

.5^ 



RC41&5DN 1&V/&0mAmDIP 1.25 



l^f 391 RF Pftwftr Afi^p Transistor 1D-2GW i^ 2-30IWHz TO -3 
S^S^ TrrrHir 1k¥-1^»' Different pinout from 55b iw/datal 
RC4134TK DlihI Trackini Hegjulator ±0.2 to 30V ^ 200niA TO gS 
RC4ldSTK Dual Tnicklrig Fies^lAtat 1EV @ lOOmA {TO EGJ 
9033 Wawform Generator "- 1 I A Wa¥a Wititi CirCuitt & Data 



3/*1 

$2,25 

$3,75 



SPECIALS -THIS MONTH ONLY 



1l\l34 

1N6263 

2IM918 

2N3866 

RCA29 

LIVI741 

LM1304 

LM2111 

CA3028A 

RC4136 

LP-10 



Germanium Diode 60V 10mA 

Hot Carrier Diode (HP2800, etc.) 

UHF Transistor— Osc/Amp up to 1 GHz 

UHF Transistor-1 Watt at 432 MHz 

NPIM Power Amp/Switch 30W TO-220 

Compensated Op Amp mDIP or DIP 

FM Multiplex Stereo Demodulator 

FM IF Amp/Li miter/Detector 

RF/IFAmplifier DC to 120 MHz 

Quad 741 Op Amp — Low-Noise 

LOGIC PROBE Kit-TTL, CMOS, etc. 
(See Above-"OTHER ADVA KITS") 



10/$ 1 

$1.00 

4/$1 

$0.75 

.70 

6/$1 

$0.99 

.99 

1.45 

.95 

$7.85 




ELECTRONICS 



BOX 4181 K 
WOODS! DE, CA 94062 
Tel. (415) 851-0455 



A24 



201 



ftiLLET ELECTB«IICft 

PHONE ORDERS ON MASTERCHARGE OR VISA CARDS 



P. O. BOX 19442E 
DALLAS. TEXAS 75219 
(214) 823-3240 



B8 



.\ PS-14 HIGH CURRENT REGULATED 

POWER SUPPLY KIT 

A (ow cost, no ir\{\%, heavy duty power supply. 
Designed for use and abuse! 

12\/ ® 1"=;A Less Case, 

l^v ^ ia« meters & jacks 

* Bener than 200MV load and line regulation 

* Foldback Current Limiting 

' Short Circuit Protected tl^ f\t\ 

* Therma! Shutdown *p*5D.UU 

* Adjustable Current Limiting UPS SHIPPING 

* Less than 1% ripple. PAID! 

* 15 amps 115 to 14.SV 

* All parts supplied incJuding heavy duty trans- 
former. 

* Quality plated fiberglass PC board. 

A COMPLETE CAPACITOR DISCHARGE 
IGNITION KIT for $9.95 

You get all the electronics less the case and heat- 



sinks. 



I * * * P * * ! 



*« p. *w**a«v«WB«»«*a« *•««■«» ***#4«w*w«»«*»«a»«.«#B.| 



I * ** « # 



SPECIAL SALE! The response to our anniversary sale 
on GDI's was fantastic so here goes again,„WHlLE 
THEY LAST..,auv two CD I kits for S9.95 each, get 
the third CDl kit for SI, 00! 



PS~12 DUAL RANGE 3 to 30V VARIABLE 
HIGH CURRENT POWER SUPPLY KIT 



^^ C3^^ ' 



ALL THE FEATURES OF THE PS^14 PLUS: 
Continuously variable from 3-15 and 14-30 volts, 

(2 ranges) 



Note the PS 12 DOES NOT 

have thermal shutdown, 
Canadian orders include $10,00 
for shipping and insurance 



$49.95 



UPS Shipping 
Paidf 



OVERVOLTAGE PROTECTION KIT 

Provides cheap insurance for your expensive equipment. 
Trip voliage is adjustable from 3 to 30 volts. Overvoltage 
instantly fires a 25A SCR and shorts the output to protect 
equipmenL Should be used on units that are fused. Di- 
rectly connpatible with the PS-12 and PS-14. All electron- 
ics supplied. Drilled and plated PC board. (Order OVP-ll 



$6.95 



2N6283 MOTOROLA HOUSE # DEVICE 

J, _ 20amp NPN Darlington with Hfe 

ff 1 ^1^1 of o^^*^ 5,000! VCE of 80V. Out- 
^1^^^^/ performs IVIJ3001 and MJ1O0O 

devices, TO-3. Limited QtyJ 



MK-05 MINI MOBILE CLOCK 

The smallest and best priced mobile clock kit on the mar- 
ket. Designed to be a mobile clock from the ground up. 
There has been no compromise on quality. 



I 



LM340-12 HOUSE # DEVICE 

1 amp voltage regulator WITH SPECS, Built- 
in thermal and overvoltage protection 



TO-3 



CA3011 RCA's HIGH GAIN WIDE BAND 

75 DB gain, 100 KHZ to over IC IF AMR 

20MHZ ID lead TO-5 can. 

With Specs. 5 f Of $2.00 

MC1351P FM IF, LIMITER, DISCRIMINATOR 

AND AF PREDRIVER IC IN A STAGGERED LEAD DIP 
PAK, 

5 for $3.00 



FEATURES: 

* Quartz crystal timebase 

* Toroid & zener noise & overvoltage protection. 

* Magnified .15", B digit LED readout, 

* Complete with presettable 24 hr. alarm, 

* 9^14 VDC@ 40 to 50 ma. 

* Readouts can be suppressed 

* EASY, QUICK ASSEMBLY 

* All components required included (you supply ttie 
speaker)-. 

* Top quality drilled and plated PC boards. 
Clock board: 2.6" x 2'' 
Readout board: 2 3/8" x. 75" 



Snull cnousph to 
mount rn ti» 
instrumtnl p»n«li 



MINI ELECTRONIC 

GRANDFATHER CLOCK KIT 

Complete Electronics! 

• Chimes the hour (ie: 3 times for 3 O'clock) 

• Unique ''swinging'* LED pendulum 

• Tick tock sound matches pendulum swing. 

• Large 4 digit .5" LED readout 

• All CMOS construction 

• Complete electronics including transformer & speaker; 
drilled and plated PC boards measure 4.5" x 6.5" 



$39.95 



BEAUTIFUL SOLID WALNUT 

Custom case for above kiL Over 9^" talL $1 9,95 



* No COO'S. 

* StrKi chack m MO 

* Mm.X9fChmtq/9 or VISA sccvptad, 
' TflXAs Rosidvnls odd S% Mt« taJt. 



Forstgn orders add 1Q4& {20% arrmail) 
CaTnliraf in^iKlMi urith SKcfi Qrdsr 
Ordvn cmf $S0. take 10% discount. 



SPECIAL 



All Phone Orders over S10* from this ad 
will receive a FREE Warble Alarm Kit 
(S2.50 value), during September. 




NEW LSI TECHNOLOGY 

FREQUENCY COUNTER 

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS NEW STATE-OF-THE-AftT COUNTER FEATURING THE 
MANY BENEFITS OF CUSTOM LSI CIRCUITRY, THIS NEW TECHNOLOGY APPROACH 
TO INSTRUMENTATrON YIELDS ENHANCED PERFORMANCE. SMALLER PHYSiCAL 
SIZE. ORASTtCALLY REDUCED POWER CONSUMPTION [PORTABLE BATTERY 
OPERATION IS NOW PRACTICALI, DEPENDABILITY, EASY ASSEMBLY AND 
REVOLUTIONARY LOWER FRlCtNGr t|1Q95 



KIT#FC-50C 



60 MHZ COUNTER WfTH CABINET « P,S. 



COMPLETE! 



KIT#PSL-6S0 ' • SSO MHZ PRESCALtn FNOT SHOWN I 29,95 

MODEL#FC-50WT eo mhz 

MODEL # FC-50/ 600 WT. - mq mhz 



COUNTEFI WrftE&, TE9T&0 fl, CAL. 
COUNTER WIRED. TESTED ft'^Ci 



a p f ofii£J" »• !£liE*' 



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U*Mt"<* 



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1/lflllC 



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llfC 



SIZE: 

3" High 

6" Wide 

FEATURES AND SPECIFICATIONS: 

DISPLAY 1 a RED LED DIGITS ,4" CHARACTER HEIGHT 
GATE T)ME^: t SECOND AND 1/tO SECOND 
PRE6CALgH WILL FIT INSlOE COUNTER CASINET 
RESOLUTlOl^ t HZ AT 1 SECOMD. 10 HZ At IMD SECONO. 
FHEOUENCY RANGE: ID HZ TO iAMHZ. m MHZ TYPICAL], 
SENSlTlVtTV: 10 MV RMS TO SO MHZ. 2Q MV RMS TO GC MM2 TVP 
INPUT FMl^EOANCEi 1 MEGOHM AND 2Q PF. 

StXOOE PROTECTED INPUT FOR OVER VOLTAGE PROTECTION. i 
ACCUftACY: ± 1 PPMI* OOOt. 1 lAFTER CALIBRATION TYPICAL. 
STABiHTY WiTHtN 1 PPM PER HOUR AFTER WARM UPf.Wt '* XTAL| 
IC PACKAGE COUNT B [ALL SOCKETEDI 
INTERNAL POWEH SUPPLY: 5 V DC REGULATED. 
INPUT POWER REQUmED: fl-12 VOC OR 115 VAC AT $&^eO HZ, 
POWER CONSUMPTCON: A WATTS 

KITWFC-50CIS COMPLETE WtTH PREDRILLED CHASSIS ALL HARDWARE AND StEP-BYSTEP INSTRUCTIONS. 
WIRED $ TESTED UNITS ARE CAMBRATED AND GMARANTEEO. 



pliiCALE 



eiiic 



PLEXIGWS CABINETS 

GreaHOfOodts or any LCD 
Dig I rat project Clear-Fted 
Chass I s s^^^rve s a 5 Be;e) I o 
increase contrast oMigiUl 
lABINET i di&pJa.vs 

3"H.6K"W.5}i"D Black. WtiitB or 

Clear Cover 



CABINET II 

214"H,5"'W.4"D 



$G.SD 



ea 



REOQRGREYPLEXIGLASFOH DIGITAL BE2&LS 
r*c6'«WB" g5«ea 4/*3 



SEr THE WORKS ClocHKII 
ClMT Plastfllai 5l«ivd 

*6Bi9 4" digits 
• 12 Of 24 hr lime 

*3&et switches 
•Plug; Irartsformer 
•Hi parts incJutJe^ 

Pie>ig,ta&is 
Pre-cutiiJfiii&tJ 

KilfSSO^CP 

Sae 6"H,4Vi "WT D 




|!^jjget^ 



to^ed 






#TB-1 tAcf|uM3bie) 
^Jea £/ TO- »i3 Iwir &Cal$9.95 



60 Ht 

XTAlTiMEBASir 
Wjiie^^abie 
OigirarCiocifK^ts 
o^Ciocii Cafenc^ar 
Kds 10 operate 
'rom 12V DC 
1.2 PC Board 
PowefR«4 5-15V 
j2 5MA TYP> 
Easy J «]r« hootiup 
Accuracy *. 2PPW 



SPECIAL PRICING! 

PRIME - HIGH SPEED RAM 

21 L02-3 

LOW POWER - FACTORY FRESH 
1-24 St. 75 ea. 100-199 S1.45 ea. 
25-99 1*60 ea. 200-999 1.39 ea. 

1 9m»v ^^- 



1000 AND OVER 



S-OIEir LEO CLOCK CRLCnOHR Kl'l 

Off rs- w^-snoeEE pj.p,sm $ wore... kit mi 



FOR THE BUILDER THAT WANTS THE BEST FtATURING 120R24 HOURTIME - 

S9'30'3t DAV CALENDAR ALAflM, SNOOZE AND AUX. TIMER C^CUITS 

Will alternate time f 8 seconds) and date (2 $#cands1 or may be wirfid for time or dam di^pi&y Qf^W. 
with other functions on demand. Has built-ir^ o$CiMator for battery back-up^ A loud 24 hour alarm 
with a repeat able TO minute snooze alarm, alarm set Er timer set indicators, toctudes 110 
VAC/60HZ power i^ck with cord and too quality componenu through-cMir 



KIT 7001 8 WrTH 6 - 5 " DIGITS *33 95 

KIT 7001C WITH 4 > •** OlGiTS h 

2 3 DIGITS FOR SECONDS M2 §5 

KIT 7CB1XWITH6 6 DIGITS MS.35 

KJTS ARE COMPLFTE rlESS CABINET} 




OiSiPlAT 



o^e-a- 




JUMBO DIGIT CLOCK 

Acomplete Kit (less Cabinet) featuring : 
sii( .5" digits, MM5314 IC 12/24 Hr. 
time, PC Boards. Transformer. Line 
Cord. Switches and all Parts, ideal Fit 
jnCabinetlt 

Ki1»5314-5 ♦IS'" 2/*38. 




$<k95ea. 



EISSBBB 



foot X oiSPifl^v j^i ^ nisPLAv 

AL L 7001 KITS FITCABJ MET I AND ACCEPT QUARTZ CRYSTAL TIME BASE KIT f TB ? 



.^^ JUMBO DiGiT ^0« 

W CONVERSTION KJT 51' 

Convert small digit LED clock to large 
.5" displays, Kll ir>cludes 6 - LED's, 
Multiplex PC Board & Hook up info. 

Kit *fJD-iCC For Common Cathode 
Kil WJD-1CA For Common Anode 



PRINTED ClflCUlT 80AHDS for CT 7O01 Kirs 
sold separately wkth assemblv 'nfo, PC &oards are 
drilled FiberQiass. soLdcrr plated and scrci^ned 
with ccunpcjnent I layout. 



Specify for 7001 



AUTO BURGLAR 
ALARM KIT 

P«0«^iM& mOUUMWA^C nut EJfi*v£ 

**frf^m^ FOfllJLt*!* n*«*»EA«it A14.PIJ 
OO laO* ■! Foot ED ■ t tCw r««Ct^' f mS c& a 

ii£iUOM*G DCFAjLEO DiUll«l>«lGK Ah^D M 

iftmctiohs on Avjuukkii mHa amS' 



oi:^] 




KlTiALR-l 
$9.95 

#ALR-1WT 

WIRED& 
TESTED 

St9.95 



VAftmaLE REGULATED 

1 AMP 
POWER SUPPLY KIT 

■ yAR(ARL£ FnOMA l<9 14V 
« SHORT CIRCLIJT PBOOF 
» 723 IC HfGULATQR 

• 3HXS6 PASS TFlANSlSTOn 

* CURFIEMT LIMITING AT 1 Amo 
ilTT IS COMPLETE iNCtUDiNG 
Df^PLLED & SOLDER P^ATtO 
FlBERt^LASS PC BOARO AND 
ALL PARTS iLeSS TR*NS- 
PQowgEI, KITIPS^I M t» 

TRAr*SFGTiMER^*v CT *iii 
ptowtam 300MA ar ^TVArHS 
1 Afrpflt5V. ».K) 



/77/JS/LS /-*?0 CLOCK 



MODEL ^2 VOLT AC or 
#2001 ^^ POWERED 



20135 






• fiJUMftO ,*" RED LED^S BEHIND RED FtLTER LENS WITH CHROME RIM 

• SET TIME FROM PRONT VIA HIDDEN SWITCHES • 1'2/24^Hr. TIME TOftMAT 

• STYLISH CHAHCOAL GRAY CASE OF MOLDED HIGH TEMP. PLASTIC 

• BfllDGE POWER rNPUT CIRCUITRY — TWO WIRE NO POLARITY HOOK-UPI 

- OPTIONAL CONNECTION TO BLANK DISPLAY (Use Whtn Ke^ Oft in Car, Elcl 

• TOP DUALITY PC BOARDS L COMPONEMTS - INSTRUCTIONS^ 

- MOUNTING SRACI^ET mCLUDED 



ASSEMBLED UNITS WIREO 9t TESTED 

ORDER *20OT WT [LESS SV. BATTERY] 

Wir^ iD' l2'Hf. Oj}. ir not ath«rwJ5« ipfrcifl«J. 



J OR 
KIORE 




OPTOELECTRONICS, INC 

BOX 219 HOLLYWOOD, FLA. 33022 

PHONE [3051 921-2056 / 921-442S 



ORDER BY f^HONE OR MAIL 
COO ORDERS WELCOME 



ORDERS TO USA & CANADA ADO 5 FOR SHIPPING, 
HANDLING 4 INSURANCE ALL OTHERS ADO 10 - , 
ADDITIONAL $1.00 CHARGE FOB ORDERS UNDER 
115.00 - COO FEE SI .00. FLA. RES, ADD 4% STATE 
TAX. 



mistwdtaqua 



B4HHAMERICARI 



ttv^ittr 4t't 



vnMJD 



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HIGH 



DUPA 




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^k^ more sol^ffh I diodes evcrv time you 
want tu if) Anew r«jptr4iiur: 
Just p!«^ the Synthac Oder into the back of youf 
radio, select rhaiinel 22, and the Synth*icoder 
lakes comminti of your radio — Giving you 
Rngeriip contf al of ALL frequencies. 



• Front Pjne! TtttfSibwheel Controf 
of AJrChanndi: 

• Fuffy Automatic Invalid Code Control i 

• SmaUSize: 3W" x UV x 6^' 

• Factory Wired and Tested 

• Easy To Install 



SPECIAL 

onSy $»?.95 

postpaid 

CA Residems add 6% saies tax 




■P^^-fiWVK W«HkMiiM^.rt¥ 



I 'l ^ i*—" nnw« 



P.O. BOX 2233 

1247 COMMERCIAL AVENUE 

OXNARDCA 93030 

(805) 486-081 7 

D I 'LL BtTEl Ptease send more info, 

n I'M HOOKED! Please RUSH my Synthacoder 




Name^.. . 

Address __ 
City 



handling). California residents add 6% sales tax, 

i enclosed, DCash D Check D Money. Order 

Please charge my D Master Charge D Bank Americard 

Credit card ^ 

Interbank ^ ^__ 

Expiration date .^^_ 

Sign ature _ — ^ — 



.Xi h. 



^hH^bH^iA^HA 



^ipwi^i^^A^^^^^^^u^^^*^^^ 



[ I ■ L 1 L I 4 JJ I 1 ■ ■ ■ I ■ ■ ! 1 ■ 1 I I 19 I I 



Call 



^^^iB^^^^Mua^i^^^^^l^^^^ 



^HMfAffa^^U^^U^^^^B^ 



Pvv^^'^M^fa^^^^^^^u^a^^^^^^^U^M 



State 



Zip 




E12 



I I I I I 1 I M . i I T I I -itr^t^ftmmJU-\m 



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J 




WE PAY POSTAGE 



ELECTRONICS 



p. 0. Box 401247, Garland, Texas 75040 (214) 271-2461 



16K E-PROM CARD 

S-100{IMSAI/ALTAIR) BUSS COMPATIBLE 




DEAl.IiR L\Ql !?M S INVITED 
SPEOAL OFFER: Our 2708*s (650 NS) are SI 2. 95 when porchased with above kit 



$69.95 (KIT. 

IMAGINE HAVING I6K 

0¥ SOFTWARE ON LINE AT ALL TIME! 

KIT FEATURES: 

1. Etouble sided PC Board with solder mask and silk screen and 
Gold plated contact fingers* 

2. Selectable wait states. X USES 

3. AU address Lines and data lines buffered! 
4* All sockets included, 
5, On card regulators. 

KIT INCLUDES ALL PARTS AND SOCKETS! {EXCEPT 2708's) 





1KX8 2708 

EPROMS 

Prime new units irom a major U.S. mfg, 
650 N, S, access time. Equivalent to four 
1702A's in one package! 



GOING INTO 

BUSINESS 
SALE! 



$15.75 



each 



8K LOW POWER RAM KIT 

(S-100 BUSS COMPATIBLE) 



$149.00 

i KJl of All 

P^ris and 

Sockets) 



The last word in RAM Kits. Uses 21L02-1 
RAM's. All address and data lines fully 
buffered, PC Board is solder masked and silk 
screened and has gold plated contacts. Four 
regulators with heatsinks included. 



OPCOA LED READOUT 

SLA-1 Common Anode, .33 In, 

character size. The original 
high efficiency LED display. 
$.75 eaeh 
4 FOR S2.S0 



741C OP AMPS 
MiNt DIP. Prime New 

Units. Has computer 

MFC's house number. 

12 FOR $2 

inn FOR $15 



T, L ASCII CHARACTER GENERATOR 

TMS 4103 JC. 28 PIN CER DIP. 
Has seven bit COLUMN Output 
for use with Matrix hard copy 
devices. V^ith specs, $3,50 



MOTOROLA 7805R 
VOLTAGE REGULATOR 

Same as standard 7805 except 
750 MA OUTPUT. TO-220, 
5VDC OLTPUT, 

$ .44 each 10 FOR $3.95 



DISC CAPACITORS 

J MFD 16 V. P. C. Leads 

Most Popular Valuel 

P,C. Leads, By Sprague. 

20 FOR $1 



TANTALUM CAPACITOR 

1 MFD. 35 V. Kemet. Axial 

Lead. Best Value. 

10 FOR $1 



1 AMP RECTIFIERS 

House Numbered. Factory marked 
units. AU meet 200 PIV minimum. 
Many up to 1,000 PIV! 

30 FOR SI Full Leads 



NATIONAL SEMI. 
MA1003 CAR CLOCK 

Not a kit. Complete tested 
module. Works on 12 VDC, 
has on board time base. 
Sold by others at $24.95. 
Big .30" Bright Green 
Digits, Same as used by 
Detroit in new cars. 



tEH8 



M, 



*# 



riTffffWfwiTrfjifiT*./ 



$19.95 



EDGE CONNECTOR — $1-50 



MPS-6566 - TO - 92 

plastic, NPN. 

VCEO-45 HFE 100 TO 400 

10 FOR $1 



TRW POWER DARLINGTON 

15 AMP 500V NPN. $2 Each 



HIGHSPEED SCR 
TO-66 5 AMP 250 PIV. By Hutson. 

S.69 Each 



TERMS: ORDERS UNDER SIS ADD S.75. NO C.O-D. WE ACCEPT VISA AND MASTER CHARGE 
CARDS- MONET BACK GUARANTEE ON ALL ITEMS. TEXAS RESIDENTS ADD 5% SALES TAX. 






D20 



ELECTRONICS p. O. box 401247 •garland, TEXAS 75040 •(214) 271-2461 



Did someone say "PARTS" ? 



CMOS 



<»O01 <^uad 2 ^ft NOR gate.*. 
^tOOZ dual *f In »0R Qote-,. 
^007 dual comp paSr+lnv. . 
tfOOB ^ bit fuM adder.. . . . 
kOQS tnv hex buffer.**.*.* 
hU\Q nontnv Ke?i buFfer.,.. 
^0\y quad 2 In HAND gate.4 
^QM dual ^ In HAND gat«. . 
^On dual D FF w/ S and R. 
l(0]i( 9 stage static Sft. . . , 
kQ\% duaJ It stage stat Sft. 
^01 € qudd bilateral switch 
k^U decade cpunter/dlv, . . 
%01^ quad AKD/OR $«l g^tc. 
^020 J^ st3§« binary cfttr. 
*i02t g stage static St*..- 

'lOZI triple j In MAHD 

M}24 7 KC«ge binary cncr.. 
^QZS trlpte 3 In ttOA ^te. 

^Q27 dual M K-S Ff.** 

402$ BC& to declfnal d«codc 
4D29 pin»ct Cable U/|} cntr. 
JtOJO qiBd EX-OR gat«.^;,„ 
*i033 dei;ad« counter/d E vSd. 
kQM triple AKD/Oft p«iri.. 
£fOi<0 12 srafje binary cntr. 
J^O^l quad true/comp buFFcr 
^O^S quad dncked I^Lch* 
40^3 ^uad WOR ft/S latch*., 
40*fi« quad NANP R/S Tatch. * 

40J^7 Hiylt I vibrator , 

40^g inv hejt buffer...,,.. 
405G ^oninv heic buffer**.* 
^051 8 ch muHtpleifer. . * ,.* 
kQ5Z duAl ^ ch multlptexer 
4053 triple 2 ch muHlplex 
4560 &SC h/ 17 shtge divide 
4iOB6 quad bilatera) iwltch 
^069/ ^ ^ 
7k^0h ^** inverter, T , i^, ,- , 

4Q70 quad EI'OR gate.*.,** 
407T qua>d 2 in NOR fata... 
4073 triple I in ANO gate. 
''OJS triple 3 In 0« 9«t«., 

4Q7&/ 

74C173 *'"^'^ ^ FF. *. *, ♦,,,* 
4081 quad 2 in AND gate,.. 
4ll£ fa&t quad bllat awlt^ 
14511 bioary to 7 feg rfrvr 



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^u ^^;^ Jj^^^^i^tV^ jVnt ^ 1^ ^ ^ *1. Jf Jp 
T* T T 'P ^ ' ^ T^' ' ^* P ^ ^ T ^ T^ '^ ^ T^ T^T^ 

Low Power 
SCHOTTKY 



74LM>D....^,*... 


.*0.JO 


;4lsoi 


,0.30 


?4LS02. 


.*0.30 


74LS0%.-..„..,,., 


,-,.-.-„d.33 


74Lsaa 


...*0.3& 


74LSiO 


, ., .0.30 


74Lsn ....*, 


.0.36 


/ ^^-^ f jC.t> *'« *'»■>* % B' 1- -ft i 


.0.33 


74LS 14... ;,;*..,,, 


,. K3a 


741515 . 


...*..*. ,0.30 


jkiszn^^ ..*.** 


...0.30 


7'fLSr!... 


.***.... -0.33 


74L522 ,, 


.0.33 


7^LS26 


,.0*43 


7itLSZ7 




7iiLS30 


.*.* D.30 


74L532 


.*.* 5.3B 


74LS37. ..,....,-.* 


,., D.45 


74LS38,..* 


... *0,45 


74LS^2„..,. 


..,,,,.*. 0*98 


74LS47.... 


.1.00 


74LS48,.- .*, 


.*-- -KQQ 


7^LS74..,. .,. 


.0.50 


74LS75...,. 


**, .0.68 


7^LS76., 


.,.*.0.50 



****■-' 



74LSB6, 
74LSJ09 
?4lS12 5 

74LSI26 

74L5131. 

741 LS 139* »^< ■ <«« ■- 
74LSI39. ,-...- 
7^LSt35 ■.- 

74LS1S7 ........ 

7^LS160* ....... 

7^U161,. 

z^+Lsie?*.*...,, 

74LBI63. 

74LS148 

74LS169.* . . 

7415173-...,^* 
74LS174 

74LST75, ..*..- - 
74tS240 

74lS2S7^ -.^^^^ 
74U25B..,,.... 
74LS264 _-. 

74U2&3 *-^^ 

7*LS365/aoti95. 

74LS3fi7/S0lS97. 
74LS36S/80iS9B- 
74LS386. ... 

fli LS96, ^ . . • .•^V 
S1U^7. 

siLsse** 



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. . , * .0.61 

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..... 1. 10 

'i- ■¥ * * » * » §■ I ■•+ dUi^j 

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t i<0 

^.- -^ -ii v7 

***1.25 

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^-^ 0.75 

0.55 

1*13 

* #:p « ^ # « * 9 t B I J 



«'*■■» H 



Transistors 



2N212I NPH unmarked T0-lB..7/$l 
2N2222 NPH unnvarked TO-l6..5/$1 
2HZg07A PUP hse # plastic. .5/$* 
2M3055 «PM ftF-3 Nmjsc #, .*SI>.7S 

2N3904 KPT* Use # TO-IOS 7/SI 

2N3904 PNF h^ t TO-IOS t/$l 

2!i*400 HPH hse f plastic. . .^/St 

2«4917 P«f TO-lD€ ...5/51 

2N%$4£ KPN T0-T06 6/Si 

2PiS%49 HPH... ,..*,-*, ..6/SI 

0410T PNP 10-220 tA pwr*..S0.50 
TrP3Q&5 Ub case same ai 2H3055 

SO. 75 
COHP PAIR T0-2ZO pkg. 5A k ma» 
Hfg^Li3A 40 mlri. Bkdwn ^iOV Si. SO 

2NRF*a 3 SHz ftF power transVi- 
tori for Oic/ampl [fier appHca- 
tlonTi. Guaranteed 100 tnU out P 

1.^ mt, TO-ie iikg 3/$1*S5 

2NftF-* 2 EHz RF pwef x* Is tor. 
Poy| fflin # 2 GHz 1.0W; Pin 310 
*W, efftciency 303Stf2 OHz. Sim* 
nar to ftCA 2N5<i70_ ....... $ti*9S 

2Nllf^-2 1 fiHz RF power traJii li- 
ter, ^og^ 2.5W, Pd B*7W, Pin 
300 *. efficiency 33t. linlUr 
to RCA TAfi407. ....,.....*. $5,95 

2Mar-3 2 GKz RF pOHcr tran&is- 
iof. Pout S.5W, Pd ZIW, Pin 
1.25«. effJcieficy 33*. sf pillar 
to RCA 2N62$9,.* S6.9S 

2I|RF*4 2 GHf RF p<?wer trans U* 
tor. Pout 7-5WV Pd 29W, Pin 
I.Sy, efflcleticY 354- Factory 
selected prime 2N616S ^7,95 

FIT- 1 dkial MJFET VHF/QHF unip, 

lU'^IDii, f F,i*i ..*i*..,.^, .. + J/5I 

FET-2 htJFET WHF/UHr amp ilitillar 
to 2N44t6. TO-tS.. 3/S1 

Fn-3 dual MJFIT 1m notse 
awJIo ajnp* TO-16 2/Sl 

FET-4 ^neral purpose »IJF£T. 
TO- 18 j>ack^e . ......,.,..** 4/S 1 

FET'5 jpilu^ in replaceaedit for 
^R5 tube SKOO 



LINEARS Capacitors.. 



H-TO-99 B-mlnidip D=dip 
R-TO-3 T»T0-22O 



ll 4 -ll ir -k 



201M tight spec 301..,, 

20 1M ct9ht spec 301 

3OIH op amp^ * 

30 1 H op aaip .... J ...... . 

3D4H negative regulator 
305H positive regulator 
30S|i| fast op arnp., 
308H op afiiip... .*.*.* 

309tt +5V Ipw current ref 
309K +5V lA regulator. , 

3nH comurator. 

31 1H comparator *.*«*... 
316H hi input Z op aa^j. 
3lfirt fa$t op asp. .*.... 
320/ I2T -lltf lA re^tator. 
324lii< quad op ai^.*. *...*, ,. 
3390 single «up qtiAd cflEfi, 
344}/5T +5W 1A r^ula.tor.-. 
3A0/6T i^V 1A re^ylator-.. 
340/8R +0V I A regulator... 
340/87 +aW I A regulator... 
540/ 12T ♦IIV I A regulator. 
340/ i ST +!SV I A regulator* 
340/ 18K +l8v 1A reguUtor. 
340/24T +24v lA regulator* 
3730 AM/FM/SSB IF detect.. 
377D dual 2¥ audio amp.... 

3SOD 2W aud I o amp , . 

3BaH IW audio amp.. 

381 P dual' Itrw noiae preamp 
3B2J> dual low noise preamp 

531^ hi slew op amp *. 

540H aud^o power driver..* 

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^ 



■: q^Jotify icifkfirti far IC'i and PC Tnl*re©ft<^tctt«H« 
-ck our prlcsi and quolEty- ^rpu will ise why THI^TCK 

io» ^Ttpfil* 04P Sold*' TaSI Tint 
Ertd /Sd» ttw^Eobb on J(Xr emamn 

1-9 ia-14 

1402 Mpjfi JS .17 

1602 h6p;n .20 J9 

laaa isp^n .27 .26 

2205 ^pin ,35 ,34 

2402 24pm .36 .B 

2SQ3 2flpJn .42 .41 

4002 4<3^rT, ,60 .57 



3 L«vel W1,Q Wrofi Gold 



SKT-I4«3 
1600 
1800 
2400 
40DO 



"^"T 



;j 



u 



TOU KKlOW WHAT 
THEY SAY 
ABOUT AN 



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\w 



V 



RIBION CABll «C INTERCONNECTS 



StNGLE END 



I No 01 Pirn 



«■»•«* 



ft * , ft 1. . 



DQ^jBlE END 
2.S7 2,97 
3J3 3<24 
4p75 4.94 



3*36 
5J4 



'^^-k 



f f ^ f T ,» ,i ■» a • • - 






"■ # 



MRF475 



NPN SILICON RF POWER TftANStSTOft 



PROFESSIONAL Keyboard Kitli 

-.V A3 ¥Mf%. p<JpwJ«r A^9-33 fofflflttl 
ii^ Suggid 'lj-1D P.C iodrdl 

•'1 two-ltfy St!,, 

' hAOS D-TL TTi CamtM^Mm ovlpultl 

' Uppvr Cmv tecliotii' 

' le*. LPFl Hli|LL",il H-H^' 



,, ., .dedcirwd prfirianty Tor us^ tn sln^la sideband Mni^ai' oiriplinar 

outT^ut appilcofions in cit-tzflns band and ethar communicarlonj oqulp- 
ment operating ro 30 MHz, 

O QiDraelerizad for Single Sideband and Larga-Sfgnat Aeripiifjer 
Slgnul Ajnpj'fltr 
Appll notions UHlizing Lov^-L^jval Modulation 

O Specrfjed 13.6 V, 2QMH% ChcimctorJiHci * 
Output Pdwbt - 12 W (PEP) 
Minimwrn Efficiency -40% J[5Sfi) 
Odfpuf Pow«f = 4ft0 W tCW) 
Mlftifhyn, Efficiency = 50% (CW) 
Minimum ftw«r Gotn = tO dB (PEP & CW) 



ItoiMH 



CvOr 






■?rp.*i 



£— -IIP &»-V9^4 



C^«-xtj' tlijrif^'l 



OfT^lf iiSEi* Sft 



T » r 









*SffiL 



.^mo 



•fr 



Tj T^, 



VjI«p 



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-lili-«*tM 



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PTfWri! 



- f .V.| : . |.]. .■ 



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Direct fep1i?ceinent lor 250M9 fpr iiv^»ortAd rnfidt* 

MR'F-475 W B'J 



■■■■^■■■4b**'P*'< 



I I 



Model 753 iCs^^ovil (wirt« fr** cDnri«ef«i^M ,S59,?5 



2N53D1 Super Twviy 

::>y^ 40V 3QA NRsI lilican ttrsntlihy in rO-3 fWf*i^ fo^ l^9w« 

splf' ppsA eleatsQir. Mode hy Molnrala ibr giont cvmpMiar cdrnpony 
w^o over sfodfjed Hion- ftuM ^Jf|. 
2N 530T t Hmjse Mcrk j .,, ft.ft...^.^. *„**,,,.„,.,, ft,.. ft.,ftftSJ»25 



Populi;^ ifnfiQrt ^cnnainiun pewwvr Iniftwilw in TO^-^ 
Us«d lit fnony iii^KiilaU FofM and fw&ord piaywi, etc. 
2SS367„.,„„ ..-■■. ....S^.50 



rtt VoKoge HI Ft7*fer NPT. 

C: .£, DS6W1 » o V4(K)V, 5A MPN tromiitar in TO-3 com. Und f n 

Horrscntioi deOec;:!]^! driver for <soi4r l#V, o* afly HI yolhigc h* puliA 

emHi^ {^|]lioatians# 

056Wlft. *..,S2.55 



MM74C93S -1 

3>, digjt DVM with multiplexed 7 «h{]inndnt Outpui 



*>i 



HW 



LtlfeM 






-**, 



>i&«l 



H* MM74C935 MonoJmHc OVM circuit n 

imvq iltantbril ccttvpl^atetAary MOS^QAQS) fvdhiHilogir. 

A pvfie imxJulolian onolog-+o-«iigital csnvcrtlflr '■cKnJ- 

« Is uand dnf requirai no eKicmal preciiiflt ca wp p - 
entift In cxldtticri, Miis tedknlqu* aJla«n H14 IIH of 4 
c«F*r«nce tiait^ogie tttat is tfsa lame pofvity ib fhv Eiv .* 

One SVrrTL} power siqipl^ ts nequrred Ofwrgring wirh 
on iialdtcd $Mpply oliaw^ tbm convmvcti of p9iti¥« at 
well ot negative vottoges* Iha ugn af the Inpjt vet t a p* 
ii QutofKiirciiliy detennined and ovtpvl on tfi« ngn pin. 
If the powtt supply h not ifolated, only one polarity of 
vtihogm nmy be converfAd, 

Tine conv^^ior rote k let by non Internal oicillafa-. The 
JVequen^ of Fhe o^citlafor con be sot by on ORtemal RC 
rielvrork or the oiotlEatoif con bs drtven htm on oxfomel 
If^ueficy scarce. When uung the extenKtl AC notworik , 
fi square wov* t^^Apui 1 5 ovoitobtOft 1 1 h Imporfont ta 
rtofe that" great care has bsAn tnl^Afi fo lynicHrortze digit 
multlpie^tng with tfie A/l^ converalon timing lo fllimi"' 
note noise due fa pQ^er uj^pply tronjienh. 

Tfre WM74C935 has been designed to drive 7»jeamofli 
multiplexed LED dis^lq;^^ dtrecTly wirh ihi old of 
axternol dEgIt buffersond segmenlf resistors, Untior 
condition of oveironge, the ovarFJow output wilj g© high 
and the display wilt reod -OFL w -OFL, depending on 
v.-hether the input voltage is positive of negotivfl. (fi 
odd It? on to this^ the fhosI ilgnlficant dig ft is bionEcgd 
vvhfln zero. 

A start conversion Input and a conversion ■completo 
output pre included 

FEATURES; 
O OpeatiGS From single 5V lupply 
O Converts OV lo J*99?V 
O Mulilplei^ed 7-s^maf>t 
O Drtvfii sflgmei^ti directly 
O No e^femol precFSion component necessary 
O Medium ipecd -^ 200tTi5/convafisoft 
O All inputi and o«i/tpuh TIL compatJblit 
O Jntemai clock s#t wjil^ RC netwofk or driven 

externoDy 
O No off^iBl adjust required 
O Overitin^ indTcoted by *OFL or -OFL dltp^oy 

reading and OFLO output 
O Analc^ Iniputs m oppllcationt ihown ooci withUcnid 

+200 Volti 



APPU CATIONS: 
O Low east digital pcnv?- »^y wmfdmM 
O Lo** coat 4[gita) TmiltiiTHitefi 
O Low oost dipttoi pwel Rseten 
O Eltminofe ond^oQ rrRjItipleiting by u^ng f«iiv>te A/ti 

converter; 
O Conv0t ondog Ing^i^jcBi {tMipsraliJie^ prmmt 

iSiphaObmss^i g etc, } to ic&gTtsI trensiltfoen 

!AW*Cn^i^\ with ipea , , , , i\6M 

Specs t»Jy far f4C*35 ., ^.,,.,.$,90 



LM33aZ lefefence diode 

^?eciiion 2V relHence fo be used i-i"itti MM74C935-1 

u^^336^ ,..*,. „„.tt.40 



tRi -tek, inc. 

6^22 nooth 43136 Jivenue, 



masfiH ciwgE 



We pay urfac* ih4p^f>g on ail ordwi o*er SlO US, SIS Parr ^i lu*!^, 

Plm* «W edffo 'or frn* cttEij or oar moiU £rc^ will be - _ .iwi. Otdmn 
under SIO^ odd SI tLondlitig. Pleose ocM 50^;:^ imunmce. ^Aa$f<r cihorgc iv>d 
Bonk Araerico eardi wnJcocne^ [£20 minimwa). Tele^ihona onkin, may b* 
plo«d HIAM to 5i30f^ Aifly, M^ ihni fri. Call 602-931 -452a, or 603* 
^1-6949, Check reoder service cord of send vf»Tip for our lo»«r fly*n 
itkmi with new and urpjus electnwic conqjotigiti . 



ALDELCO ELECTRONIC CENTER NOW OPEN! 

Kits, Books. Boards, Magazines. Special 2102LI S for $17,50. 8080A CPU Chip $19.95. W<? stack OK Battery Operated Wire Tool 
$34.95, OK Hand Wire Wrapped Tool $S.95. 7400 iCs CMOS. Timers PLL's IC Sockets. All kinds of transistors, rectifiers and diodes. Plus 
other electronic parts. 

Add 5% for dipping. Mmanum order $10.00 Out of USA send certified check or ifioney order; include shipping costs. 

BUTLD THE W7BBX PROGRAMMABLE KEYER. SOLm STATE PARTS WITH IC SOCKETS $42.00. WE CAN SUPPLY THE FOUR PC 
BOARDS AND COMPREHENSIVE CONSTRUCTION MANUAL - ALL FOR ONLY S29.95. 



AL and PHIL say: 

\f you're in our neighborhood DROP IN and say Hello. If you're too far away to Vistt, give us a plrone c^ll at 516 37B-45S5, and well be glad to 
take your order over the phone. We have Master Charge and BankAmericard, Orders can also be sent COD, either UPS or U.S. Mail. Store hours 
are 9:30 AM to 5:00 PM, Monday to Saturday. Wednesday evenings till 9:00 PM. Give us a try. You'll like our friendly service but more than 
that you'll enjoy AldeJco Quality in everything we sell. Want our catalog quickly? Send a first class stamp. If you're not in a rush, circle the 
reader service card in the back of the magazine^ 



#22 PVC Siranded hook upwire 

50' roll ..._.._ $1.00 

OK Wire Hand Tool 

WSUaOM (modified wrap) " 6^95 
Battery operated wtrewrap tool 
BW630 Wraps ii^30 wire 34.95 
New! IVIodei BW 2628. Wraps 

#26 + ^^28 Wire S39.95 

Batltries not included. 

• RECTIFIERS 

2 amp M volt 20 for $1,00 
2 amp 1000 volt 10 for SI. 00 
2 amp 1500 volt .5 for 1.00 
6 amp 100 volt 69 



10 amp stud 50 volt - 


. 1.50 


10 amp stud 600 volt 


.4.50 


40 amp stud 50 volt . 


. 1.20 


40 amp stud 750 volt 


.2.05 


BRIDGES 




2 amp T05 50 volt . . 


...35 


2ampT05 200 voit . 


...50 


2 amp T05 600 volt . 


.1.25 


3 amp 50 volt 


...50 


3 amp 400 volt .... 


.1.10 


25 amp 200 volt . , . 


. 1.50 


25 amp 600 volt . . . 


.5.50 


25 amp 1000 volt . . 


.8.50 


•ALDELCO BOOKSHELF 


Howard W. Sams Books 




TTL Cookbook 


S8.95 


CMOS Cookbook 


9.95 


IC Timer Cookbook 


9.95 


TV Typewrtier 




Cookbook 


9.95 


Microcomputer Primer 


7.95 


How to Buy & Use 




Micracampyrers 


9.95 


tm SI [JO cwr book oiikf rv 


dxpiang 


• FETS 




40673 


1.55 


MPF102 


.55 


2N3819 


.35 


2N5457 


.50 


2N5458 


.50 


2N5459 ......... 


.55 


2N5485 


.50 


• DARLINGTON 




MPSA13 , 


.80 


MPSAU 


.40 


2W5306 


.50 


• SCR 




C JDBA 


..S5 


C106B 


..65 


C122B 


-.85 



LOGIC PROBE KIT 
Aldeica is now the sole 
dfStributDr of the 
DIGAPEAKE * a logic 
probe kit. Mow yau can 
buy direct and save. Probe 
measuras logic 1, logic 0, 
and pulsing circuits con- 
ditions formerly sold for 

SPECIAL S1 1.95 

ACCUKEYER KIT. Sim- 
ilaf to tlie lamous ARHL 
Handbook vinion. Kit 
includes PC board, tC 
sotketi. ICs, speaker 
^Ttcb and alt parts and 
instryclions. 

ONLY S19-95 

ACCUKEYER 

ME*flORY KIT 
Adaptable to meny keyers. 
Can store 2 canned 
mes^ges of 30 characters 
each. PC board IC sockets, 
ICs instructions and all 
parts. $19,96 

#26 RIBBON CABLE 
Solid colors 

14 Strand $.25 ft 

20 Strand .45 ft 

26 Strand .50 ft 

40 Strand JD ft 

50 Strand 1.00 ft 



ZENERS 



1N74610 IN?5ia 400 Mw ea 

lN5333 3n 1N537R bmvu 

AL2lS[GE21b) 
AL21D[G£ ^1Q) 

ZN3904or JN3M& 

74tQi 7D9HPinDlP 

S55 Timpr 

5^ OuJl 65& 

1M9l4$!Slr4t t! 

lOfiO C¥DS 
Lli309K Vun Reg 
ILOO^ 

UHCldchCh^e 
■2SZ3 

IMim Of 74 f »'P DiF Od Am0 
L*i74IC£ T05 Op *mp 
14 or 7& Fin iCSoaeii 



.25 

2 10 
2.40 



»■»■■• 



S4^a 

39 
25 
70 

! 10 
2^ 
A^ 

I 50 

ffflr gs 
1^ 
ZOO 

t m 

4^ 

3J& 

S9 

45 

45 
30 



RF DEVICES 



2N33'h:iW«OOMHf S5.50 

?N38€E iy^40a!^H/ 115 

?N5SB91W irSMHi 4 75 

?N5590t[JVn?bMHj- 7 90 

2N&591 25Vi/ 17BWIH/ 10.35 

?SC6I7 3 95 

2SC122G 1.25 

2M60BQ^W 175MH/ 5. 40 

2N60fH 15W l?^MH/ M5 
2I^J60B2?1JW I 75 MHz . 10.95 

aNeoB3:3Wj i;5MH/ 12.30 

2NB0a4 4OW U5MN/ 18,30 

2£C130e 4.30 

2SC13a7 5.25 
2M;B?6 iOK^^ 10.95 



ALDELCO KITS 



• NEW IMPROVED 
ALARM CLOCK 

PiQJtal alarm €iock • Stx big .5 display LEOs 

• New on board AC Transformer •12 Hour 
format with 24 hour Alarm • Snoofe 
Feature • Elapsed time ir>dic3tof. 

A natural for car^, campers and mobile 
hotnes. Use on 12 volt dc with opucmal 
crviial ttme base (rtot includtng cabinet I 

S19.9& 

• CRYSTAL TIME BASE KIT 54.95 

Optionar cabinet — in simulated walnut grain 

or black leather _ , S4.95 

i'lastic cabinets — blue, black, white or smoke 

S3.95 
Red clock filters .,,.,,, S.60 

12 or 24 hour DIGITAL CLOCK KIT uses .5 
display LED. &31^ clock chip fits our stan- 
dard cabinet. Freeze feature SI 8,95 



NOW 




2 Dual Digit At 

f 2-24 laaur ciocit iiits 

IVtODEL ALO^; 

Si^ btv ^ dM|l4av LEOt tn an attract dv? black pi^^ttz C4hin«t wrth i r«d 
ttOfM tiiitt. Qtw&t fa* j> hjm or b/oadcsft fUliian. S^l i>nt dock lo GMT 
itM i?lh«r to loaf tiTfM. Or hd«« t 24 hour torntat dn orw dodc arrtl 13 
hour on ih* othir. FrsBca tEatm let^ the clock b« tar la ih* ta>a)nd. 
Eftdi ctocfc h oontrcHcd tvpvtfelv. Cilnocl <n«aiAirit 2X" h 4^" « 

MOOELALO?; 

Four bright .3 nk»a* rub* dnpUy, CafaifMl n tn itt^actiY* <^»*p blui 
irKHtfdtni} tront iiltir Witl cin|»lav acondl at l4l« ptdh o* 4 butie'i- An 
iwT to artf fUtion Cabswi sLa s 2>j" k 3" e JIK,'". Cq«<rt|ii!i« Kn 
S34 3S, 



7400 SERIES 


7400 . .. te 


7401 . 


18 


7402 , 


-20 


7403 , 


. , . .20 


7404 . 


25 


7405 . 


. . . . _2S 


7406 . 


jm 


74G7 . 


J& 


7^08 .35 


?=110 ..20 


7*11 30 


7413 JS& 


7414 ...... .70 


741& . ..,.,.45 


7417 45 


742D JiS 


7421 ,, 40 


7425 .:;.,, AB 


7427 40 


7430 20 


7432 ...... .32 


7437 SO 


7438 1.05 


7444 1.10 


7445 1 .10 


7446 l,4S 


7447 .90 


7448 1 .tS 


7450 .50 


7451 20 


74S3 ^..20 


7454 .,,*.. ,20 


7460 .ao 


7470 .. 


45 



747£ . 

7490 . 
74ilJ . 
7495 . 

748G . 
7489 . 
74^ . 
7497 

7493 . 

7494 . 

7495 . 

7496 . 
74100 
74104 
74105 
74107 
74121 
74122 
74123 
74125 
74141 
74145 
741 4S 
74150 
74151 
74153 
74154 
74155 
741M 
741S7 
741^ 
74161 
74162 
74164 



1. 
1. 



1 



1^1 '■ 



.50 
.50 
75 
15 
45 
.40 
.60 
.30 

.ao 
so 

.25 
. .45 
. .45 
, 50 
.55 
. .60 
^.05 
, .85 
1.25 
T.2S 
26 
10 
00 
35 
70 
35 
t.^ 
1.3S 
t.35 
1.45 
1.50 
1.70 



74177 . , . 
741S0 ... 
74161 ... 
74182 . . . 

74191 .,, 

74192 ... 

74193 ... 
74194 
741^6 . . . 
74199 .- . 
74283 . . . 

74LSSE 

74LS00 .. 
74LS02 . , 
74LED4 . . 
74LS08 ., 
74LS10 . . 
74LSn . . 
74LS20 . . 
74LS21 . 
74LS22 , . 
74LS30 . 
74LS37 . . 
74LS3S . 
74LS74 , . 
74LS90 , . 
74LSS3 . . 
74LSn3 . 
741_SV14 . 
74LS13Z . 
74LSl3fl . 
74LS133 . 
74LS15T . 



. 1 35 

. . ,95 
.3,75 
. .-75 
,1.50 
. 1,50 
.1.45 
1 45 
1 25 
.2.25 
. 2.2S 

RIES 

.. .39 
.. .39 
. . .45 
.. ,39 
.. .39 
..,39 
. . .39 
. , .39 
,..39 
. 39 
. . .45 
. . .45 
,. ,65 
, . ^5 
...95 

.1.55 
. . .45 
. . .45 

1 a 



74LS153 


tm 


74LS155 


. 1 55 


74LS160 


225 


74LS161 


2.25 


74LS163 


225 


74LS159 


2 25 


7415173 


1 95 


74L6175 


t.»S 


74LS190 


2.60 


74tS191 


. , 2 as 


74LS193 


. .2.85 


74LS19S 


. . 2.00 


74LS196 


..2,00 


74LS197 


. . 1,75 


74LS257 


. . 1.75 


74LS365 


. . 1.7S 


74LS36G 


I.7S 


74LS3G8 


1.7S 


74LS390 


. , 3.75 


74H SERIES 


74H0O 


33 


74H01 . . 


35 


74HCM . . 


. . . .31 


7iIHtO . . 


. .33 


74H21 , , 


,. 33 


74H30 . . 


.. .33 


T4H40 , . 


-.33 


74S SERIES 


74S04 . 


.. .45 


74S40 . . 


. ,30 


74S153 


7 25 


745158 


2 0O 


74S175 


.2.25 



Aldeico presents a 



M2^ 



Frequency Counter and digital clock kit in one cabinet 



1 2 Of 24 hour 

digital clock 

Six.3c)ispiav LEDS 




Frequency counter 

typiat IPO Hi to 40 MH; 

accufacy ,0001% 



VAR lABLE POWER SUPPLIES 

PS-B &-15 volt dc 600 mA . . , , 

PS'1 2 1 2-28 volt dc 60Q mA ...... 

Add SI .00 per ktt shipping 



Swjtchable from couoter to clock. Clock maintains tim« 
while frequency counter H in use. Can be wired for either 4 
or 6 digit clock. Small size makes attractive unit for atito or 
boat. Operates on 12 voH DC. Plug tn povwer supply i^ 
available for 1T0 volt AC use. Comes complete wttti 
Instructions. Cabinet and all parrs assembled unit . ., 

$139,95. Optional 1 1 volt AC supply . $5.95 

Kit on ly ....,., $99.95 

Frequency counter kit with memory similar to above but 
Without digital clock , ,,..,.... . ,$99.95. 



. $6,95 
.$6.95 



Assembled unit .._,....,.. $139.95 

110 V ac power supply . , $5,95 



ALDELCO 



2281A BABYLON TURNPIKE, MERRICK NY 11566 

516 378 4555 



209 



S.D. SALES CO, P.O. BOX 28810 -A dallas, texas 75228 



^ Imsai - Altair ^^A" Compatible Kits ^ 

Dealer inquiries welcome on these Items: 

4K LOW POWER RAM 



Z-80 CPU BOARD 

Pti»n ih# umt pMfria whc brou^t you tli« $39.!35 4K RAM KIT. W* war* not rti«fii¥i 
Id initoduHC* Mtt \rmAtfA.\Wii cornp«li|il4 2-80 Cm4, Iwt m^ do tail tfut DUn ttm th« hesi 
iitttiv4 artd t^uiJiiy for tti* tow*!! prie*l Tb« a^nnem ttdiui«ft o1 lh« 2-40 ludi « «n 
■JUlwi l d Mt 0t IH tnstmcftQx^. SOaOA witwir* axnpHibiiitv. •nd op«fltion trpm a 
lifiglc 5VDC wjp^v,. «r« HI wt4l linmvn VWiat nufcu Oil' CVd diftWmt is tfie eictra cai« wa 
took (fi ll!K htfrifrtH ^makl^. Tht CPU urd wilt ahwarv ^^^ on an Ml rtate. W« aba 
i*Ti«r>t« TRUE SYNC on cvid. to mvurv i^t iit« rwst of ntf ly^nm functioni pnwvrtv. 
fhiiinlr inamorv rvtratli aiirf ANMI ••« baM#iE tiut lor your tn*. B^Mfn tt ot nol, non «i1 
at «r compvtitori h^mt fOrt* W tfv aatra troubl* al dain« rtnt. At ^htaf% thn kit ifi«lMi$c» 
•it pvlft. ati tochtB, Kid coififiiat* JifmmciiAm fat •«« of isHsnblY. Bvcsuw «<( our p«t 
rwgmnmn^m wttfi our 4K kit wt wflifrt iKit venj orde^^fffY. AN ardKiiiriR b* fhippuri oA 
m nrlct iniii c«fni ttrst wimj totk. Kii itH:iyd«i Ziiog Bfaniil and 90 pom. Kit ^ifi^ti 
ntiti 2 MHZ c-vitiiL ^^^^ ^^.^ ^ Manual - S49.95r Add SSiM) for Z"«QA 

2 -SO Manual - $7.51) Separ^ttelY' 

Complete kit - $149. 



fMSAl AND ALTAIR 8080 PLUG 11^ COMPATIBLE. USES LOW 

POWER STATIC 21L02 - 1 500ni. RAM's, FULLY BUFFERED, 
DRASTICALLY REDUCED POWER CONSUMPTION, ON BOARD 
REGULATED, ALL SOCKETS AND PARTS INCLUDED. QUAL 
ITV PLATED THROUGH PC BOARD. For 260 ns RAM's add $10. 



THE WHOLE 

WORKS 



$89.95 
kit 



NEW! DESIGN CONSOLETTE KIT - $89.95 



S.D. Saks announces the i ne.it pcimvc wa> to beat the wii« wrap jungle. Our latest feit gives yuu 124 sold^ricss ijuiuk connect lenfilnab. enoufli 
fuf eight 16 pin IC*s and prtivide* SO \ 8 coinmon buss matrix. Has r^ubled +5VIK and +. - I SVDC. alt at I WIP. Voltage regubfirtn at TOCT . 
Also includes a puL^e genera i«r variable from lOhz to SOitiliz and .01 sec. 1o 100 nitnw s^jcoivds. Geneotor output is +5V. In kit fonn only and 
iiicUitlei^ all p3rt>, "-ot kcte; front pand mF:^UTes 7'4"\8'V\ and Itiiniware- i-aw not xivailaNe. 



CAR/BOAT KIT 

$34.95 

%uoc to (fom Eui! 






MUSICAL HORN 

Wh|fH»f Horn hit foi^ e^t, bo«t ^f hpnw PJvvt onv lunM fri^m MlU*rt lo L4d Z«pptfin, 
Ch«n9B 1un« m »corfih: cofnp^fiv Htid iUt> fivcirvtiib. SuHndwil of cim«m lvn«v 
an^lablt al 56.9 & each tYow tufiplv iha »hi«i rti(i»k - w* »upplv atact*oi»M?t fo* vfl*" 
favofilt tuneJ OiV Ming tupplnwJ with CHtgriiiBl o^dfri SlurKlAtd lupcf ^ir4il«t>Ift- DtX1E 
- EYES Of TEXAS - ON WISCONSIN - VA.IUKEE DDODL£ DAI^DV - WOTHE 
DAME FIGHT SONG PINK PANTHER - ACSI£ tfifAH SONG - ANCHORS 
AWAY - KEVER ON SUNDAV - eftlDGE OVifl RIVER QUI CANOY MAN- 
Stindard2 inch S ohm sfMiafctr Mipol4«d. P«iwar hoin fviiilpb^H fqr jc^r/buat kii, 



HOME KIT 

$26.90 

Kit includes fpexker inrtiK^ aperfftti 
fFom your dooi b«4l. WTlflt^ <^04r bv^i 
tf pushed your Inarite tuna is |t1«Y9ii^ 
Car/boal kil irtdudtx t|Mkb»r MnJch 
operate]: trorn car/faoaf llOltl flUtf^ 
Allow 4 vftMks deltvatv omboth hlti. 



$9.95 kit 



6 DIGIT ALARM CLOCK KIT 

We mide 4 tant^itc kit Qvstt b«1t(ir. fliKies^tgned Ta tBk« AdvAniAtjii of tIid luiiift idvancvf Yn IC lActn nology . F«iiturefi: Littonix Dual %" diBiikpvf, Mpttvk 
50250 super clock chip, «jngl« \X,. (ogmont dMi^irir, SCR d^^a driven,, QiBrtiky iiirrt|9l|fii(l canitroct^Dn. Mora reliat^le «id ea&Jer to build. K4t Includet «ll 
neeestaty parts 1ext#^i c^^j. For P,Cr bonid Add S3.D0; AC XFMR add Si .SO. Da Ml caNru£« with Nan-Alarrn kits s^M l>v gur tompQiition ! Elimin^lB' 
lh& hiwifi - Avoid the 5314! NEWt WITH JUMBO LED READOUTS! 



1000 MPD 

FlIt'Bf CfBI 
Ftjlftd 3a wyvoc Up- 
right iiiyitt wlih PC 
leidtip Moil pnpuur v«i- 



4/$1.00 



SLlOe SWITCH 

Our &61I lelior. Inc^iudoi 
i^tnlJ9iiii« Ai^d itandiird 
ilriii lin-y.^B nnd muiM' 
P'a»ltlr>ri Litil|{,. All new. 



12/$1.00 75<P ea. 



POWEH 

RESISTOR 

15 OHM 

BY 
CLAROSTAT 



RESISTOR 
ASSORTMENT 

>&W 5% flf 10% PC 
leads. A ^liod mix of 



200/$2 



PC, LEAD 

diodes; 

1N^14B/1NE^M4 

100/$2. 

1N40Q2 1A 
100 PIV 

40/$1. 



AMD-1702A 

FACTORY PRIME UNITS' BRAND NEW! 
1.5 Micro-Seconds Access Time. 

10/$40. $4.95 ea. 



* SfmL! * 



3.579545 

MH2 Timsi 

Base Crv^taJ 

S1.2B 



2S PIN SOCKETS 
3lcirSl.CK» 



. ^t-o^i^SJ"'"' 'C s from XEROX 






1402 A Shifi Regulator - SOc 
MH0025CN-5SC 



Qs^ 

"M 



I 



7400 
7402 
7404 

7406 
7407 
7410 
7416 
7420 



9c 

9c 

9c 

lie 

! 1c 

9c 

1 3c 

9c 



7410 
7440 

7417 
74 IS 
745 1 
7474 
7475 
74 S6 



9c 
9c 
TOc 
10c 
9c 
16c 
24c 
T6c 



7493 
74121 
74123 
74151 
741 SS 
74193 
8233- 
Iniel — 



26c 
-22c 
-32c 
- 9c 
-22c 
-35c 
3Sc 
1302 



-45c 



CALL m YOUR BANK- 
AMERICARD OR MASTER 
CHARGE ORDER IN ON OUR 
CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES 
TOLL FREE WATTS LINE: 



Texa^ Residents Call Collect: 

214/271-0022 



c 



1- 



527-3460 



11,000 WIFO 

50WVDC 

Computffr Gracto Cap 

S3.W each 



THERMrSTORS 

MEPCO -NEW! 

1.5K0HM 

5/$1.00 



DISC CAP 
ASSORTMiMT 
P,C. Lend!. At luail 
10 diff«rflnl sraiuiBA. 
Includefl ,001 j .Of, .0& 
plm Oth^r itflridnrd 

60/$1.00 



3^ MFD 

IS Sf Mflllory 

ElecfraEyttc 

1&fotSV.0a 



FACTORY PRIME! 
21L02-1 

Hal aniy or* our RAM'S f^st^f rhan s spuBding hulfei btit thty 
ir» now vflrv low power. We are pTBa^qd l4j erffiT ^Time raw 
ZILOZ-t Low Ftivt^T and Sup^i Fast RAtA'%. Allovvi; ¥0« ta 
STRETCH v(JUf power ^ppEy farther and at thtsdmiB tima kBM 
fhfl wait Itght off I 

500ns 8/$12.95 
250ns 8/$15.95 



MK5G397-$B.95 

S D. S^in EnctirihraP Eli4M*d unm <C SfMCUrlty niodtliad ux digrt counttr orcuiiC 10 mn^ur* 
59 mm., &9 iK:.r99/1O0iwc, Nrfnti; for dwlt room iqnds* dws^ tinwi' or airv tinting Afwlicaliaru. 
Supfa^wdi wiA daia t>MMt Brtd ACIpifcai^iat*, 



MOS 6 Digit Up/Down Counter 

4iO PtN Dtp. £T*ryiriir»g yay «v*f Mrantad in m. counliBr idaqi. f^attms: Dirvct LED iapiHiM dm*, 
tutgl* po«r«t iupply E12 VDC TYP£L ux dftCaiito up/doqm, pre-toHMlIc counlir, lapirali 
IokUM* conifHrt f *» it w ifrilh co m pf* iMitipui. BCD snd uren iwneni outputi, inlanul 
meillvtof , CiHW conip4itibi«. Iiadinq U*0 bl«nkii1ie, 1liHZ_ eEium inpirl frvqi#eficy. 

$12.95 



TERMS: 



NO COD^S. TEXAS RESIDENTS 
ADD 5% SALES TAX. ADD 5% 
OF ORDER FOR POSTAGE & 
HANDLING. ORDERS UNDER 
SIOOO ADD 75c. FOREIGN 
ORDERS - U.S. FUNDS ONLY! 



Orders over $15. - Choose $1. FREE MERCHANDISE! 



210 




It's Toll Free... So Dial Away! 




• 



• 



for the famous 



HAM-KEYS 




Model HK-1 

• Duai-lever sau.ee£€ paddle 

• Use with HK-5 or any 
elecirpnic keyer 

• Heavy base with non-slip 

• Paddles reversible for widie- 



or cJose- 

Jinger 

spacing 



29 




Model HK-4 



Combinafpon of HK-1 and HK-3 
on sante base 



44 



Terminals, red or black. Z 75 each 



Base only 

with rubber teei $1 2.00 




lavy lype knob, only $2,75 



Model HK-2 

* Same as HK-1 less base for 
incorpor^ifon in ov^n key or 



19 




Model HK-3 

• DekJKe stratghJ key 

• Heavy base . no need to 

• Veivai i^mooih aciFon- 



Modes HK-3A 



Same as cibave 
less base S9.95 



16 




Model HK-5 
Electronic Keyer 

• Iambic Circuit for squeeze 
keying 

• Setf-compieimg dots and 
dashes 

• Dot rnemory 



Batrery operated wilh provision 
^or ej^iemai power 



• Built-in side-tone m on liar 

• Spe^^d, voliume. tone an<i weight controts 

• Grid block or direct keying 

• For use with external paddle 
such as HK-1 



69 



FOR NEWOR USED 
AMATEUR RADIO 

GEAK . , . we're specialists 
and carry i>t stock most of the 
famous-brand lines. Or, we will 
talk trade. 



FOR FAST, DOOR- 
STEP DELI VERY 

give us a call. You'll be amazed; 
for we guarantee we'll ship 
your equipment the same day. 
Plus, most shipments are PRE- 
PAID. 



TO SAVE MONEY 

. . . join thousands of our satis- 
fied customers who buy from 
us as easily as from their local 
supplier. So, remember your 
call is Toll Free. 




We welcome your Master Charge or Bank Americard 

HAM RADIO CENTER, INC 

8340-42 Olive Blvd. P.O. Box 28271 St. Louis, MO 63132 




H2 



211 



DIODES/ZENERS 




SOCKETS/BRIDGES 




TRANSISTORS, LEDS, etc. 




1N914 


lOOv 


lOmA 


.05 


8-pin pcb 


25 WW 


.45 


2N2222 NPN 


J 5 


IN 4004 


400v 


1A 


,08 


14-pin pcb 


25 WW 


,40 


2N2907 PNP 


.15 


IN 400 5 


600v 


lA 


,03 


16-pin pcb 


25 WW 


.40 


2N3740 PNP 1A 60 v 


.25 


1N4007 


tOOOv 


1A 


.15 


IB-pin pcb 


25 WW 


.75 


2N3906 PNP 


.10 


1N4148 


75v 


10mA 


.03 


22'pi n pcb 


45 WW 


1.25 


2N3054 NPN 


.35 


1N763A 


6.2v 


z 


.25 


24-pin pcb 


35 WW 


T25 


2N3055 NPN 15A 60v 


.50 


IN 758 A 


lOv 


z 


,25 


28'pin pcb 


35 WW 


1.45 


T1P125 PNP Darlington 


.35 


1N759A 


I2v 


z 


.25 


40"pin pcb 


50 WW 


1.95 


LED Gr&en, Red, Clear 


.15 


1 N4733 


5.1v 


z 


.25 


Mofex pins ,01 


To- 3 Sockets 


.25 


DX.747 7 seg 5/8" high corn-anode 


1.95 


IN 5243 


13v 


z 


,25 








XAN72 7 seg corn-anode 


1.50 


1N5244B 


14v 


z 


,25 


2 Amp Bridge 


100-prv 


1,20 


FND359 Red 7 seg com-cathode 


1.25 


1N5245B 


15v 


z 


.25 


25 Amp Bridge 

1 


200- prv 


1.95 


i 




C MOS 1 






— 


T T L - 




4000 


.15 


7400 


.15 


7473 .25 


74176 


1.25 


74H72 ,55 


74S133 


.45 


4001 


;2Q 


7401 


.15 


7474 .35 


74180 


.85 


74H101 ,75 


74S140 


J5 


4002 


.20 


7402 


.20 


7475 .35 


741 81 


2.75 


74H103 .75 


74S151 


.35 


4004 


3.95 


7403 


.20 


7476 .30 


74182 


,95 


74 HI 06 ,95 


74S153 


.35 


4006 


1.20 


7404 


.15 


7480 ,55 


74190 


1J5 




74S157 


,80 


4007 


35 


7405 


.25 


7481 .75 


74191 


1.35 




74S1 58 


.35 


4008 


1 ,20 


7406 


.35 


7483 .95 


74192 


1.65 


74 LOO .35 


74S194 


1.05 


4009 


.30 


7407 


.55 


7485 .95 


74193 


.85 


74L02 .35 


74S257JS123) 


.25 


4010 


.45 


7408 


- .25 


7486 ,30 


74194 


1.25 


74L03 .30 






401 1 


.20 


7409 


,15 


7489 1.3S 


74195 


,95 


74L04 .35 






4012 


.20 


7410 


.10 


7490 .55 


74196 


1,25 


74LT0 ,35 


74LS00 


,45 


4013 


,40 


7411 


.25 


7491 .95 


74 1 97 


1,25 


74L20 .35 


74LS01 


.45 


4014 


i.to 


7412 


.30 


7492 ,95 


74198 


2,35 


74L30 .45 


74 LS02 


.45 


4015 


.95 


7413 


.45 


7493 .40 ' 


74221 


1,00 


74L47 1.95 


74 LS04 


.45 


4016 


.35 


7414 


1J0 


7494 1.25 


74367 


.85 


74L51 ,45 


74 LS05 


.55 


4017 


1.10 


7416 


,25 


7495 .60 






74L55 ,65 


74LS08 


.45 


4018 


1.10 


7417 


.40 


7496 .80 






74L72 ,45 


74LS09 


.45 


4019 


.70 


7420 


.15 




75108A 


.35 


74L73 .40 


74LS10 


,45 


4020 


.85 


7426 


.30 




75110 


.35 


74L74 .45 


74LS11 


,45 


4021 


1.35 


7427 


.45 


74100 1.85 


75491 


.50 


74L75 ,55 


74 LS20 


.40 


4022 


.95 


7430 


.15 


74107 ,35 


75492 


.50 


74L93 .55 


74LS21 


.25 


4023 


.25 


7432 


.30 


74121 ,35 






74L123 .55 


74LS22 


.25 


4024 


.75 


7437 


.35 


74122 ,55 








74LS32 


.40 


4025 


.35 


7438 


,35 


74123 .55 


74H00 


.25 




74LS37 


.40 


4026 


1.95 


7440 


.25 


74125 .45 


74H01 




25 


74S00 ,55 


74 LS40 


.55 


4027 


.50 


7441 


1.15 


74126 ,35 


74H04 




25 


74S02 .55 


74LS42 


1.75 


4028 


,95 


7442 


.55 


74132 1,35 


74H05 




25 


74SD3 .40 


74LS51 


.65 


4030 


.35 


7443 


.85 


74141 1.00 


" 74H0S 




35 


74S04 .35 


74LS74 


.75 


4033 


1,95 


7444 


,45 


74150 1.00 


74H10 




35 


74S05 .35 


74LS86 


J5 


4034 


2,45 


7445 


.80 


74151 .76 


74H11 




.25 


74S08 .35 


74LS90 


1 30 


4035 


1.25 


7446 


.95 


74153 ,95 


74H15 




30 


74S10 .35 


74LS93 


1.00 


4040 


1.35 


7447 


.95 


74154 1.05 


74H20 




,30 


74S11 ,35 


74 LSI 07 


.95 


4041 


.69 


7448 


.95 


74156 1.15 


74H21 




,25 


74S20 .35 


74 LSI 23 


1.00 


4042 


.95 


7450 


,25 


74157 .65 


74H22 




.40 


74S40 .25 


74 LSI 51 


.75 


4043 


K25 ' 


7451 


.25 


74161 .85 


74H30 




,25 


74S50 .25 


74 LSI 53 


1,20 


4044 


.95 


7453 


.20 


74163 ,95 


74H40 




.25 


74S51 .45 


74LS157 


.85 


4046 


1.50 


7454 


.25 


74164 .60 


74H50 




.25 


74S54 .25 


74LS164 


1.90 


4049 


.80 


7460 


.40 


74165 1.50 


74H51 




.25 


74S74 ,40 


74LS3e7 


,85 


4050 


.60 


7470 


.45 ' 


74166 1.35 


74H52 




.15 


74S112 .90 


74LS3e8 


,70 


4066 


1.35 


7472 


,45 


74175 .80 


74 H 53 J 




.25 


74S114 1.30 






4069 


.40 








74H55 




.26 








4071 


.35 


















4082 


.45 


















9000 SERI 


ES 




LINEARS, 


REGULATORS, etc. 




9301 




.85 


8266 .35 


LIV 


1320K5 (7905) 1.65 


LM340T24 .95 


LM723 


,50 


9309 




.35 


BB36 ,95 


L^ 


1320K12 


1.65 


LM340K-12 2,15 


LM725 


1,75 


9322 




.85 


MCT2 ,95 


LIV 


1320T12 


1.25 


LM340K'I5 1.25 


LM739 


1.50 


95H03 




.55 


8038 3.95 


L^ 


1320T15 


1.65 


LM340K'r8 1.25 


LM741 8-1^ 


I .20 


' 9601 




.75 


LM201 .75 


LIV 


1339 


,95 


LM340K24 .95 


LM747 


1.10 


9602 




.50 


LM301 .25 


78 


05 [340T-5) 


.95 


LM373 2.95 


LM1307 


1.25 








LIV1308 (Mini} .75 

1 dii rt ^•% j^ iF^ ■ 1 «^ ^v 


L^ 

1 H 


1340T-12 


1.00 


LM380 .95 


LM1458 

1 il ■ r^#~k ^k^L 


.95 


MEMORV ri f 


3CKS 


LM309H .65 


L^ 


1340T-15 


1.00 


LM709(8;14 p\N] .25 


LJVI3900 


,50 


1 Tl ^— IT|%^ 


* *■ t \^ ^^ 


^\^ IVxJ 


LM309K(340K-5),85 


L^ 


1340T-1S 


1.00 


LIV1711 .45 


LM75451 


.65 


748188 (8223) 


3.00 


LM310 1,15 










NE655 


.50 


1702A 




7.95 


LM311D(Mim) .75 










NE556 


,95 


MM5314 
MM5316 




3,00 
3.50 


LIVi318 m\n\} .65 








NE565 
NE566 


.95 
1.75 








2102-1 
2102L-1 




1,75 
K95 


INTEGRATED 


CIRCUITS UNLIMITED 


NE567 
SN 72720 


1.35 
1,35 


TMS6011NC 


6.95 


7889 Clairemont Mesa B vd. 


San Diego, CA 92111 (714) 278-4394 


SN72820 


1.35 


8080 AD 




1 5.00 


A 1 orders shipped pr 


epaid 


No minimum (Calif, only) 






8T13 




1.50 


Open accounts invite^ 


d 


COD orders accepted 






8T23 




1.50 


Discounts i 


jvailab e at OEM Quantities 






8T24 




2,00 


Ca ifornia 1 


Residents edd 6% Sa es Tax '® 






2107B-4 

1 




4.95 


Free 24 Hour Phone SOO-SS- 


4-221 1 


Master Charge / BankAmericard 







Watch for our supermarket b^rg^ins each month! 




IK1@'0' K) iM 

FEATURING THE SARGAIMS OF THE MONTH!!!! 




POLY PSMS®«-"-' 

-' -- -i.r**_ LARGEST 

SUPERMARKET 



ELECTRONIC 

DISCOUNT 



OCTOBER - 1977 73 MAG. SPECIALS 



RCA.HI^h quality 

'POCKET"' VOM 

• loao ohms per voli 

1 ^-^5 pj-eclfiicun. movecneni:? 
dio-de protected (iitJ»in=M 
burnrsut, Wt^sv^urti.'s llC roltt 
r|-lS.15fl.l[tflOr AC VDEte 
n-Ifi-lCQ-inOOi lie curmnt 
0-1 aOmHireHkljinc'c^lOOO. 
R-etisiti vitv 10 DM ohma/Toit 
AC-DC. Vbs3 pcnUte ctrii, 

aVa X iVji". Wt. r> OBA,: - 



o»5.50 TV GAME 

^^; JOYSTICK 

Includes fOurlOOH pot^ 

f<n TV ^ computer Ejtr]?!!. 
and q Liaclron^honi e;: bnlanc^^ 
insr 1V2 J£ IVi i 1'^- With 
1'^ hsinill*. Wt. 5 OES, 
Cat. ND.10A3fi<l« 




NOISE'CANCELLIKG Cuts nol^sd of machTnery, 



CB-,HAM 




h^ifhw?)^ for Gl«iir tran*- 

mlttLiHil 
4 FitA virtually aH ri£«i 

QV«ryw|i*<-«l 
Lr>' i m p^^dii n l': £: , f rf: oc , re^u ! 
,'3i>0-5flflrt He. With C' 
ccii!i?d cord. Induct*'^ tn- 



10*PO5ITION BCD 
THUMBWHEEL SWITCH 

1-2-1-ri ltC]> i;ri[.n,i.dingJ 
PrHFiti^jju? iabeleil 0-T, F, L.'S 'or 
CF cfjded for B. L ended for 54, 
0). White numeruls on a, 
Ii.Lk;1i hi^f-:kgk-ir»uiid. Eeeo iSOO [_J 

C*t. No. 10A3M« 9 JI >4t7 




■n 



GE NI-GAD POWER PAKS 

AA jjen3it<? cells, Ranged In- 
ffv.rivi-t 1 .2.1V eaoJi c*H. Re-- 
dmrieif b]* ! Wl, 2 osr. I'nfcr 
cell. Nq. CdHi Valtft S«l* 

n 10A3G89 3. 3.7S 3.50 
□ I.OA:|690 4 5. 4.30 



QUAD AM-FM-MPXi;" 

Wl IMKVl A IflVl BUtLT-JN QUAD '-^'^' 
■ ■JraEIC /&!▼■■' STEREO TAPE PLAYER 



ft a o Q^ 



t'l^t^piifHth ,:■ \^ 




L 





MoniBRBOARD 
EDGE CONNECTORl 

10$ ri"i-i CGii t;;ti;:]] s[de). 
Use wEth IMSAS A ALTAJfi! 

fl.l^n'^ pin cLtA^ a:oldp]at«H.i 
'^^ wir-p ^Tou ItfiidsL Ojren 
eSdB. fit wtde PC buflrdE 



the '^Satellite' 



QCat. No. 10A39n 



This 
MoiiTlT 



69l95 

Keg. S79.^5 al Poly Pyk^l 

• 5 wMts per channel x 
4 RMS, 20Vy total. 

li^ Psychedelic panfil 
lighting effect. 

• Brushed aluminum 
Streamlined styling^ 



Tl«« tittm^i. unit w*'v« fliv^r gff«r«dh Th« "SYMPHOflV" 
plAya quad S-traeh tapes En full dimcnfiicjn t^LicLct. Msf> 
fiMHurrs Wjkt.rjx-Quad, derive* quad Boui^d from atererv 
rfi-eorda, Lfi|iu9 niirl FM.I.^G^ phciTio L"^pu.l cabTea anti hbs 
okitputB io)- 4 Bpeahera, jAi-ks for "Quad tap^^cuLput ". 
ami n?rmijiJ%L5 for e^lern-isl I-^IW artmnfln, Kiis easily 
into wall^ conjole, or f.SLbin^i zit ^iiuf ttwa. d«a[^n. 
PJH nlvrro Indientor. Pushbutton awKchea a«lect Bter«*j. 
ntatriK, 4D diact^Lfl, p(jwi>t- Oh/O^l Baan ami li-eblr 
slide central. AddiLianal THulLif unction awtt^!h a^lectf^ 
Ahl, P9d, FM^^PX, phono, tppe: 1:i9u« piLdrl I lights 
IndLcaLe fKe&s imnGlicms, MasttHr AUdfi vniluin^ control 
vilh individual bEilance ccintrala for «ach channel: 
Omput J4telis ir^t rtuijd hfydphnrn c », Tnp-p ri«f:k pnrvBl, 
lljcht Endt-CAtea when n auad liipt: La Lnfi«rt£d, Other 
lamps indiicule the track beinK pJnysd. llg VAC, 
Silt: as jt B Jt'fl'" daep/Wt. -9 Iba, 




115 VAC t»ll- 
cooted mdtnr 

> Slidea c^asHy 
Into modularr^ 
eabln«tr 



s- 



J. C. PEHHEY'S 

TAPE 
TRAItSPOeT 





fcjBtftilenL replacement *>r" 
il**!Kn your ftwn iiuality 
tape system] AuiomutSc or 
rrirtrtual tr^ttti ftKleijtSon T^ith 
pruj^t-ani Lndit^Htor lights. 
Ptaj'er ahtits off aulomilt' 
ieollj^ wldifn tap^r i::; if«- 
tiHiVed. Riiilt-in iow-^dlstOT- 
ttcm prenmn nnd ^ow Jr-pe 
rrnjmr. Wit]] in put ii- oull^ut 
nabl^R, Reiqulrea txternnl 
t'Ower *!ipp]y, WEth iinst ruc- 
tions, Slaft y X C 3t' iJi/.'^. 
Wt. 4 li)^,C*t« f^Q.lOASOlO 



TRW 900 MKx UHF 
POWER TRANSISTOR] 

2 Iftr J^^*^- f!li'(tT$, Han^.4 take| 

^^, nott^E Keplacc!3 many traAS- 
mitter driver aJad 
tscana iaeopt, TO- 1 3 i 
d EJt t wi th V2 ^ 

m& (beta) ao- 
1.25 F^^1r^H. 
'10A3942 



miLK 



Oti 1,13*31, 

crae.l 
l«nde- 
^v^enj 

■60, Ic 

$4.9S 






BUY 
10 

BUY 
100 



15% OFF 

2^% OFF 




Your c^hofce 



4#J 



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Kit 

ear 



REGULATED 
OWER SUPPLY 



New' Eiitty [o 4t^aen]bJe! 
U^ert LMff^OK iiosJiive -foW,- 
ajte reiEutjiiiitjr. ll*>v*rsv li'ads 
Cr?!' a. tLh^.ith'e £tupp3}% Buy 2 
for a ± powfir supply! With 
trsinsiFonii-er. rffeuijit^ir, Pt" 
board &. s\\ ntrnponenC^n 
Complete kit, nr^rdin^ pIs*? 
t.o hi,[r- Wl. 4 ]l>%. 

Ciitr Np. Volt* 
3 for 1^ 10A3S54 5 

D lOAiflsr la 
a lOAaasB IS 





$4.95 



DUAL 6- WATT 
STEREO AMP 

LM-;iTU ... for AM-J-.MS, 
[;i<hrtnoa. tape i-«cord<'r^, ^ 
UKjn^'r 5 Watts X 2 ftMB 
into S Hihnisj, 6 ^ TlJD. AVO 
00 db t>i-(ie, 7& <ib c.tnt«n*l 
strl^&rtition. Supplj' lrt-.^&- 
VDC. With snnc;^;, 2 for 

Cat. No. 10A^447 D »» 



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SNT403 

SN7404 

SN74QH 

&NT44C 

5^4707 

5^74-1 (J 

5K74il 

SN74ia 

SN7414 

$N74lfi 

SH741T 

5A[7420 

SN7423 

SIH7h427 

Sfll743D 

SN7432 

SW743T 

SN74:»e 

$N7440 

SN7441 

5N7447 

SHT443 

SN7444 

SN744S 

SN744t 

5M74 5P 

5N74Si 

SN74a3 

SN74S4 

SM74SS 



Sal« 

$Q. 14 
.14 
.14 
.IT 
.IB 
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.24 
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,39 
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.26 
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.24 
.24 
.14 
.79 
.49 

.61 

.14 
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.14 
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d SH7462 
H aH74a4 
~^ SN744S. 

a s>i747* 

H SN7471 
H ^N747iS 
H SN7473^ 
D SN7474 
n SM74TS 
$N747iB 
5N74?a 
SNT4eD 
SN74A2 
$N74B3 
SN74eS 

£r474ee 

SM74&8 

!SH74e6 

DSK7491 
H AN74S2 
SPI7493 
SH7494 
SN749S 
SK749P6 
Sl^r74^B 
SN74iD7 

SM741ia 
SN74).13 
$N74114 

eN74i;2i 

SN74iZ3 
&PI7413S 
SN74il6 
&N74132 
SN74140 



rby Cut, HaJlOAtaai 

^20 J^ Typ* Na 

.14 

,14 

.14 

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,26 

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.48 

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.39 
.19 
.19 
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.^1 
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.39 
,3.9 
,83 

l.QiO 



n 51*74141 

SN7414S 

SH74149 

SN741S3 

£N741B4 

SN741S& 

SN741BB 

5N74157 

SN74lfl0 

GSW74iei 

P 9N74163 

D tN741ti4 

D &N74ie* 

QSn741«« 

□ «N74l7J 

$N74174 

SH7417S 

5SM7417T 

SN7417* 

$N7 4J.ftO 

$N74181 

5^74102 

51^174190' 

SN74191 
$H74192 
Sf174t93 
SN74194 
SN7419& 
&N74197 
SN74199 
3N743flO 
51474291 
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.%,% 
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,87 

1.19 

1.19 

,93 

.BH 

77 

1.4* 

.«B 

1.93 

.-49 

l.ls 

.99 

.%% 
.83 
.7& 

l.«9 

1.39 

4.2s 

4,2 s 



BARRCL KJT J^a 

CALCULJ^TOR 

KEVBOARDS 

10 for $1.9 



TH^T 'FiAI YOURSI'lLF W SA VfJ 

EXCLUSp^gii;/ 

GUARANTEED \ ft" ^ 

50% YIELD ON / / Ot/y J 
UNTESTED / ^ ^ ' 







It 'a t-ruel 2&-l<*jr, ^ iurvo 
ticin Jt^yboiirJ^ at rJdicU- 
loua Klvc-Jiwciy, Wt. 12 OZS. 
C«t. N»« LaAl524 

MINI BLQCK 
^CAPACITORS 

SO for$1.9g 

(Jtihc)UTabler Wsrtb $tii}. 
IILirh fiirfecSsion Bubmini 
oapB for all ^pjali^atldTis. 
Wt. 3 rtSft, Ho. 10*3520 





aafiftEL KIT ;!/252 
tlNE CORDS 

8 for 
$1.98 

IflO'a o^ AC power Ma** 
Heavy- duty. 6 -It. Ions, 13 
£a^e. WhitT vLnyl insnita- 
lk>rt & molded ptujT, Wt. a 
Q^^ Cat. rifti 10A3S43 



BARREL KIT Jam 
$¥ INOrCATORS 
w/leads 

15 for $1.98 fj 

Tn(5l immp fniitnufACtitr^r 
duiiipe tnvealoryJ Wi'»rt]i 
C5{* sa. Li he ^raj n - (»- w bis 3l1 . 
Cat. No. 10AJ52e hgbhy 



BARREL KIT 

DIGIT REAHO 
MODULE^ 

5 for $1 

ItiiTTvi s Eind 

tlnrie La tv-.i^i, 

drivEr -qhJps 



Calculator and 
ft ^ji^3lOA3&15 



BARREL K^T t^tBH 
10 AMP TNLFNE 
BRIDGES 

20 for $1.98 

Faatiity dumped sn bnrrtla; 
W* can't t-aal '^m.^ but J'f.ar 
the prit-e ytm can't ho 
wrTjnir. iiohhy. Wt. P oi*. 
Cat. Wo. I0fl347S , 




^aAi?REL KIT J(fl44 
HOBBY 
1703A 
ROMS 

3 for $tM 

tlobby faJlotil* r>l tlifl fa 
mnua eraaeabJe proRmin^ 
mEil:]p? TtOM. 20 J S bit " 
Cat. rto. 10A3729 





BARREL KIT 
400 I^ARTS 

$1.9S 

cSicjiks. rC's. for PC 
hi\me nn FC bcwirds. Duinpfd 
Inio l>iiri"*»-)* by I;u^ti:?ried'. 
■inn% malenal. Wt . ISokj^. 
Cat. Hd. 10A3401 




fiARREL KIT ^244 

^PRE^euT'H'TINNED 

HOOKUP wrnE 
aooten^h$^$1.9a 

BreHdl.i<.iJ(rrt«r!4 npte. ji22 
Tur'iTv, prtfTut Into i'^ to S*' 
l^n^tha. Aast, color Ifil^stic 
jackets. Wt. 12 o?,*, *a00 
Et.- approx, ^*^', 1 PA 39819 



o:l 1 1 h: 
work- 



^BARREL KIT fl^A 
^Ji-WATT M£TAL FILM' 

ISO for 

l^<9% metHl film resi&- 
tox-a. Lonlf l^ad!^. 10A3413 




BARREL KIT J;23» 
SHIELDED CASLi 

,40Left. S1.98 



™1t4**<*^*^ 



For ixiLkes,. atereos] l-cond. 
plus shield, ^2 fa., vinyl 
jaeketn Wt. 1 Ih. 
Cst. MOt 10A3S77 



'barrel KtT jtfaii 

IC SOCKETS 

8 for 
$1.98 

Mfr unloads I 
four la-pin. 
lo^proAI-v.Hl^. 



?>J 



yiC 



fiDbl 

Four 14''pi[i, 



BARHEL KIT #13 5 /-^ 

SOUND TRJGGERSj^^/ 

3 for v'i-it"*,! iv^vj^ 



$1.98 







BARREL KIT i:l«3 
JUM^O REI3 LEDS 

15 for $^.98 

100% fciUUtrhtl, Uiter i^n 
c^tilE^tJcin iTotn faoloi-^' 

dumipc, 3V 1^ mils, Foi- 
irjO's ijf pTojeJ:!t:;, red lent. 
Cat. Na.lOA33«9 



"Hand cl«4>"' mnBitiEes crys- 
tal mike aarij;>3|.fier. trijiger» 
SCR. Uat for alarma, t^\^\ 
Wt, fl o;s. Wo. lQA3ifrZS 

BARREL KIT #163 
MINI TRIM POTS 

30 for 1 «t 
$1.98 

A!5*t. vnt««a too lo 1 (tiftSf 

Wh&t n Isuy. SiftfrLe turn. 
^/S jV. Wt. 6 <>a. jjtftj34s 



1«1 ^^ 



BARREL KIT ffl«l 
f^OP* PLASTIC 
TRANSISTORS 

25 for $1J 

2N3 [) ft -J 'S with ii ornti 
2N'3yO&'« of 1(10^ mate- 
tial. TOr-92, PreJormiid. 
Cat. r^D. 11IAI3343 




BARREL KIT ^t^O 
HOe&Y VOLTAGE 
REGULATORS 

10 for $1.98 

LM.30&K TO- a bnrrel^a, 

bot by thft j>i>[ind, lii.u whr> 
wants to check 'em? Your 
^^\ti, Wt, 2(3 ozA.il4t9iAl333a 



% 



BARREL HIT ;?109 
TERMINAL STFllPS 

100 for $1.98 

Wi-de Eieat. of Eermlnal strip 
ConaectDrs^' from 1 contact 
Up. -Strip niiHlufBcturers 
tftrs-«l iJurrip IK y\mT pEi-jn 
Wt. 1 lb„C«l.NolOA 






BARREL KIT t^l04 
SLIDE VOLUME 
CONTROLS 

10 for 
$1.98 




BARREL KIT ^«3 
LM-340T VOLTAGE 
REGULATORS 

IS for $1.98 

Pa-ctory rd^tjl-s. Itrtbcy, coa 
mstic rejectfl Mar ineluJ* 
«. 6. na. IS, 1¥ or 24 
volta Tf>-22fl powef tub. 
Wl. 'i OZ3. C«t.lOA2635 




PARRIEL KIT t^-k 

METALLIC firm^ 

RESISTORS HLP^* 

100 for $1.98 

JVSade laoatly by tcrrtijay, 
Lh-fi Aae^t n::tlut4;>!' m^de. 
Moally V3 
a 'To LoL 



w-atWr*. 1 % to, 
V^ga, Cat, tji, lOfl^ft&a 



BARREL KIT &t* 
PRECtSiOH 

ilESIST0R5 

200 for 
$1.98 

Marhfld hti4 tmiiipo-iud 
Vi^ 2 w&tts,NaiaA24 2fl 




v., 



BARREL KIT ^71 
APACITORSPECIAI 

100 pes 
$1.98 

micas, TnoldedsK pJiietici;-, 
fPC-BTni*--*, ^^iftica, etc. Nifty 
100 %giM3d Cat-No 10A;173B 



BARREL Krr jt^lSB 
PANEL SWITCHES 

30 for 

9tS 9 OZS. 

Did you hear of OAR? Am- 
ctlier tc|pt matter bjtrr<?llfld 

all tj-p^s rif ruhtiii'kea, liLec- 
tric, ijUctes^ ^tc. lOAiaaBJ 




BARREL KIT#ia:a 
MINI-DIP IC'S 



% 



100 fofSl.SS 

74 L 'a. LMJHs). loa, i^e^. 
BSi&, who know*? Fafitoty 
mixed, 7T>il ttat- Untested ^ 
and tiuhby. Wt. 1 Ib^ 
C«t Ho. 10 A3 245 



BAAREL KIT i}t27 
AXIAL ELECTROS 

40 for 
$1.98 

As fit- capSiC] t Li'h. 
voltftfcea. C*t. Ho1<^AS227 




4*rii. 



BARREL KtT^iae 
UPRIGHT ELECTROS 

40 for 
$1.98 

"Irrtf tih ftOOmf in misii'urc 
fif vtjMap^s. ^ f\0 % marked 
er>nd. lOAl22e 




iOO^'joFE^" 



ifOOC 



QARHCL KIT ^IIS 

MOLEX 

SOCKETS 

150 for CitMi, 
$1,98 i**^'!*^*" 

OftEeiutator Tn»l(Er (l^ittip! 
^al B ill lion uf V-in. 



TiVVf 



BARREL KIT j^lOi 
RESISTOR Sf>ECIAL 

200 for 
$1.98 





In:7ti]di::s: Vj,, y^, i/^, 1 
wiitUfi, cArbon. S 
l(itt% fficn-hd, 10A30&4 



2- 




BARtlEL KIT £3a 
PREFORMED 
RESISTORS m 

200 for $1.98 






■^Vf Jut bLirrul:^ l^f -4 
lOy-: V*. tflVl '■_-" 



■■■J urid 
pc UEie, 



No.lOA2eOA 1-Ot) ^ good 



BARREL KITj^T 
VOLUME 
CONTROL ^^ 

30 for 

$1»98 100^ tfoott 

SiT]Ki^.s, dual.'!-, s-ariety ot 
vafeue-3, ^tj-lpK, bis inisfi — 
.<iti!a]l on^s. i:;«t, 10A2421 




BARREL KIT 
2 WATTERS 

100 for 
$1.98 



1> v tt 



<v 







.Swiipiiuri throw 'em Jn tlit 
biwrr-cJ, It's a- li'E gold EHift*;, 
Atl □uijfl£edC4t.MiO-'lOA2735 



e^J 



BARREL NIT lint 
PREFORMED DISCS 

150 for 
$1.98 

JlL-fi nifr'a slifitf invciitorj- 
hul he dUJiipi^Lj "em in bar- 
rels. Preformed, tat PO ufii', 
M.\}t«A vjilues tUO-lDAJLgD4 

^ ^ 




BARREL KIT 6 
lN4148/9t4 
SWITCHING DIODES 

100 for $1.98 

ImnAinf ijiJiiinLii J-W|t.<"fti[i>( 

ditideE- at t}4»-se oi-ic^^! 
CaLMo. l<}A24ia Uate£ti;d. 



BARREL KIT #99 
PHOTO ELECTRIC 

10 for $1.98 

A3&t. GK typee;^ CiiS ty]"j+;5. 
Mij^ed hy lix^Wry. Big job 

for UE to separate, lOfl'C?- 
gModl. Cut. No. 10 A 1052 

BARREL KIT jfai 
POLYSTYRENE CAPS 

100 for 
S1.98 

F'lric.tt CiLpa made. As n e am- 
ble W^ bv-Liptlt 10 barr^lfi 
irom factory, mixftd viVliiufiE 
'i'.\ )r':''HL..C*t.'ho-.ldA2729> ■■ 



?9 3 



BARREL KIT 
HALF WJ^TTERS 

200 for $1^8 

^lesLstor factory tried to 

[i>il3l Ue3 bj: mljiltjjt I IfCS fy 

dOlor-coded reGl^tOi'a in 
harrv]. Jlxii vEi-Jue la thert. 
4 D£:10AJ044? l.'iitgstcci 




BARREL KIT ^^^ ^:i 
SLtOE SWITCHES^ 

30 for $1.98 

ALL L-; h 11 F»:': K . Ki£e^^ ^J.»fs1 . it^il^i 
mon",':nt ari^sj f «lt:, Trpm-pn- 
drjus shop pak for lOO'i; of 
isWsLchjriB jiro-jttts. 
Cat. W(j. 10 A:2726 1 ?t^ firjwd 




ARREL KIT ^97 
NAT. 10 ,SONANZA!j 

100 for $1,98 

Krjbby and :3pt«Mttd. factpcyj 
milled in hArrelE. Lin«iii'sJ 
TiOft's. ROMS, i>TL^R. i-eg- 
latera. clock and caiculatHHr 
chips aflrl mrire. V^'i. 1 2 oa.*i. 
Cat. No. IQAZSflO 



'Q' 




BARREL KJT If 2 A 



BARREL KIT Ii2& voiTArf^P 

Ft, A ST EC TRANSrSTORSSiS" *?'f-J**'^ 

100 for K / 200 for 



$1.0S 

Untcitcd and bobby tran^i^. 

tori). TO--&2 ifTO'lS) . aaet. 
KX numbern^ fvsst. nianufac;, 
tdrtjr^. We. -H ilJii^. 1AA2604 



AOE ^^ 



$1.98 

up ta iz.O'OO' voliji, 4 mhlb. 
*poKy, fluinl leanSs 
Cat. No. iOA2€02 





BARREL KIT j:I40 
iNOBBY PMP POW 
TRANSISTORS 

ISfoi- $1.98 

Populiir f^e^riFLanluin and alIl 
con TO'ff*, ftictory ^'oif- 
&\\v.f." and J&3(OL|,t9.. lOfl^ 
hobby, no npens, no ikhortsl 
Wt. Tfi- <i^>5.C a<. JJA2IS1& 



BARREL KIT ^30 
LONG LEAD DISCS 

100 for 
$1 .98 

' JtiJ4::l3ijn. kiiIe; 

til rt tiled fmly. 
Cat. 10A2^9a 




Pj"4me.| 



BARREL KIT 4^aS 
HOBBY LEDS 

40 for SI. 9^ 

W[>W! Toiv U-S A. mater 

dumps discretes in bari-el^.J 
Hobby and untested- "M^^- 
ahj»j >'iifld FfC ^ rtr bettttrl 
Wt. A oEs.CalL No.:iOA2&S9 

ARREL KIT i^3tt 
HOBBY NPN POWER' 
^TRANSISTORS 

15 for $1.98! 

Factor? iallouts and "olS 
spc-^;" TO-n jMiwei-.t. 100% 
hobby, rto openE:. no shorta. 
Wt 1. Ih.Cat, N*j.l€iA2G17 



BARREL KIT ^1 
SNT40a Dtp IC 

75 for $1.98 

Marked 14 ^nd 1C Liin dl^i.^, 

rn^iiV Lnolud^ g'atea, Hip- 
tSopa. rejrietera, countnr.'t^ 
who knowa? l3n,t«Btt)d. hob- 
l>y. Wt. 1+ osa.- 10A241S 



T«inm«: Add tPtratajce Rated t nst30 
Pfione ; Wakefidd, Maais. i€17^ 245^3^29 
R«tAfl: 16- 18 Del Cannme St.. WakftfieW. 

POLY PAKS 

P.O. BOX 942 A LYNNFIELP, MA, Q1940 



BARREL KIT #19^ 
DIPPED MYLAR^^ 

00 for $1.98 

Fineat capae^Hnr't: made, 

ahJiij ftiii.th. Iniaiflne facto-1 

r>- Jumijjnsr 'em in barj-ela.^ 

Cfl (. Kq,l A^ S^7 1 00 % ffood 



n Send for FREE 
faff-Winter CAT ALOQ\ 



BE FHONEDj 



MINIMUM ORDER — Sfi.OO 



213 



Armchair Copy 




Shortwave Listening 

Our ONLY occupation is 
supplying everything you 
need to tune the mediumwave 
and shortwave bands— and 
identify what you hear. Our 
NEW mini-catalog details 
Barlow Wadley, Drake and 
Yaesu receivers, WORLD 
RADIO TV HANDBOOK, logs, 
receiving antennas & tuners, 
calibrators, FM or TV guides, 
AM pattern maps, QSL 
albums, ITU publications, 
RTTY displays, CONFIDEN- 
TIAL FREQUENCY LIST, 
clocks and alt SWL books. 

CILFER ASSOCIATES, INC 

P.O. Box 2ag, Park Ridge, NJ 07656 

l..i.ii.l.r,.u....j|.iiU.LWii.nxi.l.>^UJi OS 



2 METER 
CRYSTALS 

MANY 
IN STOCK 



FOR THESE RADIOS ON 

STANDARD ARRL REPEATERI 

FREQUENCIES 



PROUD OF YOUR CALL? . 
WORRIED ABOUT THEFT? 

Identify your FM transceiver with 
automatic code on each trans- 



Clegg HT 146 

Drake TR -22 

Drake TR-33 {rec only J 

Drake TFl-72 

Genave 

Heatbkit HW-2021 

Ir9c onlv) 

Heathkit HW202 

Icom/VHF Eng 

Ken /Wilson 

Lafavette HA'14& 

Midland 13 505 

Plagency HI) -2 



Rflfuncy HR-212 

Regency HR'2B 

Regency HR 312 

Regency HR-2MS 

S.B.E. 

Sonar 1802-3-4,3601 

Standard 146/826 

Standard Horizon 

Swan FM 2X 

Tempo FMH 

Trio/ Ken wood 

Trio /Kenwood TR2200 

Trio /Kenwood TR7200 



mission 




$X95 EACH - IN QUANTITIES 
OF 10 OR MORE, $330 EACH 



Certified check or money order only 
NO CODs 



KOLIX DfSTRtBUTORS 
P.O. Box 436 
Dunelle NJ 08812 



B15 



SMALL: Tx 2 5/8'*x 5/16'' 
Installation: Only THREE wires 



WARRANTY 
Returnable for full refund within 
ten day trial period. One year for 
repair or replacement. 



PRICE $39,95 



Ppd + S2.40 
CA. SALES TAX 



Your call sign programmed at 
faciory, please be sure to state 
call sign when ordering. 

AUTOCODE 
8116 Glider Ave, Dept S 
Los Angeles, Ca. 90045 
(213)645-1892 A36 









\0 




^qg ° rtO«^* Ni*®*^^ oft 


















e<.o^v-^?^o.^^;> 



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214 



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less batteries 
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I Audio /scope output vjith earphone 

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Are YOU 
a computer 

hobbyist 



If you are like the re^ of m 
you've been reading atxjut microcom- 
puters . . . you're excited about them 
. . * but there h so much to under- 
stand and it all seems so complicated 
that thfirB h no wav to understand it. 

Hog wash. 

A brand new magazine is being 
publjshad for computer hobbyi^s . . . 
for people who are beginners . . , 
neophytes . . . novices , * . people 
who have no idea what a vectored 
tmerrupt is, hut just the same went 
to learn about computers and have 
fun. 

A home computer system can 
cost you a bundle tf vo»^<^on't know 
what you are doing. Kilobaud ccutd 
save you a lot of money . . . others 
have teamed the hard vvsy. Kilobaud 
is a sort of giant club newsletter for 
computer hobbyists , » « a place to 
tejl each other about the problems 
they 've had . . . and the solutions. It's 
a magazine filled with great articles 
, » , all vvritten so you'll be able to 
understand them tfor a change) , 

You want to kf»ow abom hard- 
vware? Read about ttie new MITS 
Z-80 CPU in Kilobaud, simply e>c- 
plained by the chap who designed the 
circuit. Or how about the best -selling 
TDL Z-80 CPU , . . the designer has 
written about it in Kilobaud too. 
You're wondering about what cas- 
sette system to use? You can go 
crazy on this one . . . but before 
flipping out, read the Hal Walker 
article in Kllotiaud and find out what 
the problems are ... and the jo^u- 
Tions. 



What do you do with the con- 
fotifided things after you've gotten 
them working? The progfams are in 
Kilobaud . . . Jot's of them. 

MAKE MONEY 

Perhaps you've be«n thinking of 
the computer hobby as a way to get 
into a small business. Why not? This 
is going to be an enormous field in a 
coupte of years and you can bet that 
those on the ground floor will have 
the bes^t chance at the gold ring. 
Kilobaud will help you learn how to 
get into manufacturing , . . to 
become a dealer . , , a manufacturer's 
representative ... a service bureau 
... a. writer. Never before has there 
been an opportunity like this ... so 
don't muff it . . . grab hold and start 
getting your feet wet. It'll not ofily 
pay off well in the long run^ you'li 
have a ball every minute of the way. 

KILOBAUD IS BRAND NEW 

The first issue was January 1977 
. , , and the magazine is the fastest 
growing and best accepted magazine 
in the hobby computer field already. 
You doubt that? Just stop in at any 
hobby computer store and ask any- 
one you see. Kilobaud is outselling alE 
other ma^zmes combined . , ^ which 
says something considering the cover 
price of $2. It's full of good articles 
and has a sense of humor. There are 
more articles in Kilobatid than you 
can read in a day . . * most readers 
comment that Kilobaud just has to 
be read from cover to cover and this 
takes several days. It's packed. 




CONTROVERSIAL? 

You bet! Kilobaud calls a spade a 
spade^ wfeth no pulled punches. 

DO YOU WANT TO LEARN COM- 
PUTERS? 

Some magazines emphasize OEM 
systems . » . some are written rnore 
for computer scientists . , . Kilobaud 
is written for and by its readers . . . 
the hobbyists. You'll find great 
articles in there by well known hob- 
byists such as Don Lancaster . . « Don 
Alexander . . . Pete Stark . . . Dennis 
Brown . . . Hal Walker * . * Art Oi-nds 
. . . Sheila Clark r . . and many more* 
The emphasis is fun. 



vet? 



TRY A SUBSCRIPTION 

The cover price is $2 (that's $24 a 

year), but the subscription rate ts 

only $1 5 for the year ... a saving of 

$9.00. You can pay for it with your 

credit card (Ban kAmeri card. Master 

Charge. Annerican Express) or you 

can even be billed directly. Send in 

the below coupon ... or call TOLL 

FREE 800 258-5473 (during office 

hours). Please have your credit card 

handy. 

Youf subscription will start with 
the next published issue, so allow 
about six weeks for any apparent 
action. If you would like to be filled 
in with the back issues they are $3 
each and at last count some were stJH 
available. 



□ Y&SI Start my one year Kilobaud subscn'ption for $75 with the n&Kt published 
i^ue. 



Name. 



Call^ 



Address 
City 



State 



.Zip 



$15.00 enclosed, □ Cash O Check D Money Order 

Bill; D Master Charge D BankAmertcard □ American Express 



Card # 



Interbank #. 



Exp. date 



Signature : 

Q BitI me direct. (I've signed above) 

*SLJbscriptton will start with next published issU6. Altow $ix weeks for processing. 

Toll Free Subscription Number (8009 258-5473 



kibbOLd 



pfTfRbQROuqk NhOM$S 73/1 0/77 



215 





YOU s^^Lis^sa)^ 



JUNI H. <^iptu« Hmtm OMQ-7 Q^KKon Tit ^rt 
270. in£4«wiiinp ARC 2 tr^nfecc^w «*l*et«vit> 
PES7A owf ujoDlv cam^nxkin^ &C 34d bailed' 

ir«. iHVirtnVf ti ucifig BC-d£3. rACwr moTirr 
tufijni, trBntitttr cw rnii«i<t0f , BC'442 ^nf r«i«)r 
cOAv*!^!^ rrititiil* lg>BfttrT9 cuilV 'nil ii — n ^| 
fvtiO m Mlactiirttv, TV mixh. The AHT-?6 4^, 
TttC » *m ofi 22*, AUC 5 *if m « |*» AflC 3 l« 
on29Ml 

AUG G>3. Bdttarv Dfi €M itn, dftod* noiM gvfi 
^TMiKl mDdu4Atk}>ft, nnagjc T-R switch, ant <g^iri. 
hB*B rfvetll. c;w tiP«|l|cT«, VEE iMftm tlcMvgn. COaw 
IIHiVI. RF WAtlfTiatflt, TX Tube Quicia. cJiQcN 

AiiOn, wwriol mnt info, tnlo on Wm^irt anr. 

OCT B3. WBPM trmnncmii^f rdeof, IHF pfac>«f^ 
Tlar*. nhvuij Ion* P^aich^ remoie lunoct Vngi 
cOfiiiructlDi hinit, ani cauplar. SS Vsrticat. 
f^larrwriT Htormct cDimiructiDn, IM nuvlitor 
CDnvarxtr, LalayettB HE -35 mpd$, Buvai'n 
Gwidffl 10 R« & Tx^ product cl«iector. novol 
HI'C WFD, rocjio niCTC^nomv, pariadaoiar "if" 

FEB 6rt. 2M iTiultichflnnal excttiBi, m dwBjgn 

idiot^ (r\aiiz tA twitch, iDUdsp^aknr anrJafurab. 
40M aw IK, loOK ol tesi eqtiipmsni, rjidln 
aroundl, 40^^ ZL laiitictal ant. neutralLziat i^nn. 

MAY 87, Qukd j»uB. 433 Quitd ejwBd huheJ, 
ttKp<# tidied HF qiiAcl. Two fli q^Jad, mimquad., 
4Q^^ fifuarl, 4juuil •fePVJa>tntt, half quad. ltir«i 
•I ClUad, 20M tiLiiad, 1ilTD>iPfrf quad, epi^vla-vrict 
quad, Qu«d fllibUoirBphv^. feT vfo, iu|tB 
trDtitii«thDaii')0. Hl^ ciummv locd. yrii^uv 
ttftndhng "cfO," MF SSe/cw r». yaomnric nr 
cuil dvftijn, 4^50201 Ttansf tiv*. F£T convBiiar 

JULY §7. VE i>um fAcho, VEO hflfnt, d«b 
«<^(ttOf. hi>rin« tjf^n tdwrfr, trarrlilsLCK dcfti<fii, 
'^3» VHoftd'l F^ir, 9r»d plane ani. G4ZU tHam, 
SSTV rn$nbt$r, UHF FET pH^mpi. IC '(f^ 
trtm. iwlK-Bl «nf. VHFr'UHF efirpp*. i^wNlt 
hmri, KCKM mofiLtoririQ, ppoTrirq i^^^ 3 Lirv 
ooMAiftift, tu-vchool ham ciu&. Hfl»m HA 10 

OCT 67. Hf ivhcl statB m. fusawl fottiw 

SSTV 641 fan. VHF log-fM''<Kl*'^' 4h3Tataf>i* 
diOcila. prnnrna imatch ^i(», dkt ti>m» fi>;'rtg, 
mocMf'n dKinQ. 

JUNE ^ Skiririui tvmm: TrMsfvmar trie hi, 
BC 1?OC rn, APS 13 ATV In. lOiw vqlUfB Oc 
nipfi^y, vurplMt veotHrt. FM r^g cOmj^i«r^r4a^ ;«[bI 
tv|3*t, WIICOs P 3 tv. r^di^ring old aqiiii|Hins»iTt, 
7SA1 «ii ma<ii, TAA 19 on 432, Freq count«f 
UIM. f r*nl£:«:tv«f pt^r lupply, Lrfc^ fof d^cap 
itpa FteardAri, Surfriut Canvarsidn Qibli^ 
l^tphv. Ft T 209 walkba on 2M, ARC 1 guard fi, 
UTT V ** Tir, 

JULY 68. WooHcttn nsMsmt con^tfUdtidn, iMtot'^r 
IQvu4iri, r\ • a titittphQwua pol«l; IC AF qK^ 

"BtP"«K|. :, ham nliita tips (Part U- 

SEPT &S. Mwbll* vnl, 432 FET [jre^imfj*, 
eqnyiffiina TV Tuneri, xtal □«: *tflbiiiiv, nur 
aJ|«|] Tud rftsaitin, moontwunce fhOfflbIc, €\t<fl 
hqilvr ^cof roctJant Jan 6^}, QM tr^nficnivw 
(corrDct^ani Jan ii], 21^ d«b amq, ham chib 

HOV 6B. SSB Rial nil em, valid state tfQUhl* 
I^OOtlina, IC ?faq qpMTitflT frrvflnv ftrrofi & 
omiiiiianmP, "cV tratlifarrnors, Epacs i:qmm 
<hJv«WV, pultar inliti. thtn-wir? adnf;., JIQM Ti^an- 
lirftDT CW 1K/ra, BC 34BIUt doutUa co^n-iiettiQU. 
mul t J hjni; I ion tailA, cppipter wira IpOCt. ttiar 
m^ifof antHJr.ati'om, hi voUage ttantiiim lii«. 
h*m cImI;i lipi, iPtti S). 

JAN 63. &fO|M^ihaC}r ^Dfnpces^or,. HW 12 on 
160, baam lunin^t, AC mi^ltagc control. 2M 
trai>»Jiio' I*. iC pch%ef re^jc«T. «i>Ktrvirrt 
antlYiH tnTo. Oli Uarvtitioa t^t. o,parating cof» 
«3(*. BTTY BuTQttart, a»c^uLitiing ok ■.tarHirtv. 
■otnw 40 cm IB, aBe|u«f!tiai retav iwifehift«. 
»|ptiU«ia OOvaliv'* bvMfgp, ham club iicvt iP^ri 
11. 

FEB BB. SSTV EAfTKTp mod. fp fan-tc^. 
iri tiantf linaar, Miactm af fittn, uniiuncTron 
1a'a««llfl>i itrrlQ, fVikola Tma biOQrapAv. moMla 
inttaHtation nrntt, viiTra ^as» ficama studi^ I Fare 
II. 

MAR 69. Siifplut iVKue TC? tx maeH. clMMip 
tumpriwi0j/amp, nXZ^ ^aJcuiaTtont, itahmt^ 
hair«f IMirar baJanced rn^^^uraTOr. TianfllOi' 
OKi^laiOtl. itti*^ bfPv^TX. haKMAVB feedlina 
infa. Suttf^i Cvf^tmupn Bittlioqf^phv^ a>fra 
licwifa nu^ f^ri 2). 

APR ^. Ijirhanrwl icQpe imp. rx praamp, 
Twfp «r l-Tt. variabia DC foad. SWB bridga, 1 IW 
h,Hf marker fih*, toit^a rrarii^iKir ^civc-i. SB-010 
m^nitoiKD^a rtiodt, portable &^^ AM i^., 3*A 
convai tm , a^tfa iii«ani« silhIv ^ Pari 3I, 

MAY 69, 2M Turn«i>l«, 2M Sfif^t, rw trtaroMtot. 
ganDrator flirar, thdf r VEE, quad funing, uilnfl 
antannailtDpa, maaturlng 4n| igaift, ph^cinfl patch 
ro9t, SVVR IttcJicfltqf, IGOM sh&rt yen leg fs, 1 &M 
Ahtanna, Hf^ pirspnyatichrt angles, PSK enchftr. 
KW ■ummV tc?Ad, hi pciwar linaar, extra llcenaEt 
ituilv Inart i\. all hqrid cui'tHin array. 

JUN£ 69, MlcrOiMfttfa pwr noncratinn, BM %%U 
tM. 43S' «r Tx/fji. 6M conyerter, 3M 6/S Wli^f* 
whip, UNF tv lunari, ATV widito nnodulaiof. 
UHf FEt fOraaiTip*.. RTT V rnDrrilDricapa, ojntifl 
hceiit* ifudv (pan SI, building tjt^l cavines 
m\mVBB Igw 10 20HdT, vM vfo. 



JULY 69. AM »Tiiodi*laf(?r^ SSTV »Jfl gen. &M hM 
lin««r. 447 KW amp. 432 cr iw.fn GM iC 
riat. radio conifO'tivd moct^is RrTr JC 



The back issues of 73 are a gold mine of interesting 
art ides , . . just take a look at what's been covered . . , every 
possible interest. This is the most important library you can 
have for hamming. 

The supply of these back Issues is very limited . . , and 
when these are gone, that wilt be it. Don't miss out by 
procrastinating. 

Single issues $1 .50 each {before 1976) 

Ten back issues (your choice) $12 postpaid in US, 

Twenty-five back issues (your choice) $20 postpaid in US. 
Twenty-five back issues (our choice} $10 postpaid in US. 



I Lj liiitdlo rrptL'^h Filter, VRC-19 cpRvai'iiuri. 
UiPD luNHtutiOJU 2M iranajstor AClter^ aKira 
Hcama 4iudv ^i^^rt BK ^^ f^^T ^^a. 



AUG 69. FET regen far 3.B (VtH? wp, FM 
et^Btal tKwitchirbg, B/B vuaw» %;»nJc*l. inttOtiUG 
tipn to IC£, RTTV idti^ ^n, gt^Dd/tie-ci Uan 
thitof cKackat, 2M Ah^ tx, maafui'a tr4n^itlO} 
Fi, l€OM propagation, triac ap^lJAaii^irifi, 
Mni^la (F iwaep gen, tr^fniftor Jeavaf. S6 1 00 
dn $M. if^ai lf«i mnwiuffsmieni . KH',t% Ucmntm 
tludv I part 7}^ FM deviatiDci rrvater, qip am AM 
la, CMCulai quadi. FM oaiie ttgura'. traniatOf 
piramatar Haear. 

SEFT 60. Tunr>B3 diadta th^arf, ma|lc iva, 
ihOtoat'Tg lachnjauat. wtw trawal ttw«rv. cabla 
■#iwJiidw*g, trtfmiftoir fh^iQiry. AM nei**a hmiiaf, 
AFSK ian, VmtiAhfla* arnp tttrbO^tn^^ m*|kjra 
matv rtaftftancs. di^o^Ja stack pim* mjtfptv. tran 
»itl<H tasling, 3^W fiM tx, HX 10" nciJTr^N^inqi, 
Capacitcsr uaa*^, rv^Sto (iFopai^rtion, AM mod 
pmcmntm^. aatra claiB ti caw a midv tsairt 81, 
3 4<}0iZ linaaf. ATV itii£^ofi camara. ^ Irarrtif tpf 
cauata. F ET c m t m*mas M . rt latzta cJi«iia. 



lirrlitqr. 



— crrarsll, tMnb^tmr |i.>. t^iH'uiU 



OPT 66- SutKto g»tn 4<iiyi a«t, FET chirps, 
ial4Ption* Jnfo. Kop* calibraior. thvracrcF 
ttjH'a* Pf^iaetpr^ itewier lunintg rafai, idantity 
cailJiHaiiiii harmen^st. FjM adaptpr far AM r>. 
C9 vatt OO CM, proporticii>al cqntrot Mial oiran, 
UTal Uhm inftrallarian, Q-muiiipiiier. itamcai^v^ 
pvm lupp^v, EjEtra damt^idv tpaf i 91 

NOV 69^ NCX 3 Oft 6M. IF notch hltar%, dial 
caMbrHiiOn, HW^l^ZA Bxisnal VFO, &M COn 
vartar, Fa«dliin« mfo, rf Ehridga, t^n <mobita 
hlntf, u^TibiallA an^h 432 at f* (p»l th pwv? 
luturply tricht wiih diodei. irant^ttor kavvr. 
(raniiiraf biiaf d^aSgir, xral vht tlgh 8»h, ah' 
trance vjinai;, S933 modi. «xtra i^lawB iruuy 
JFinrf 10). &&34l|incer Improvamefiti 

DEC 69^ TFon*irtor-dlodfr checker, dummy 

Load/nitanuator, turviQd flltur l: holt at, liahd 
iwilcihint Switn 2S0 a TV-2, SBmh ioloctivitv, 
match dXaridlEB^,. rtl Ktai c&libraior, IrankJilpr pa 
dUiidii, hv mniille p,^,, 110 qHt Crnqniolar. CB 
ri-g on Qhfl, OKttd licenca study (part 11^. \910 
puyar'f fuida. 

JAfVl 70. tfartf^Biver acceiiorv umJi, banch 
P0viimt tufiplv. SSTV c^lcur Ttteittad, baui tunod 
coniar 1oad«4l ant^ GM bahdpdii flllat, q^mU* 
licanw tludv (part 12. ractrfiair dtoda uicmqb. 
fnctimdv inro. 

FEB 70. tB^hazh ISM difiola. GM ccmvariar, 
hlfift dankllv Pc board. c3TTipar-niQbilv hmu, 21^ 
(taq lvnth«ifE, aniiiiding/clacmdiTHl for f* 
i:>iiatafi DX 3& fnodt. pianoramic *rt»t m, ¥«■ 
laWa Z HF molHla rrKiurlt, eniira- ll^ianaii utiidV 
(pari 111. Iinnr IC tnfOi, qjp 40U i